Tag Archives: Fussy

Dinner battles.

And like so many parents / mothers, I have had many concerns about my children’s eating habits. Mainly my 3 year old who doesn’t seem to want to eat?

After reading this, now I know how much children should be eating, and my expectations for my 3 year old have adjusted. I think I was trying to ‘over feed’ assuming he needed more than he actually does?

I was once told as a new mother, children will eat when they are hungry and not to force them? Don’t make it a ‘big thing’ especially if they refuse as it will only create a negative affect. Possibly have them refuse all meals and create unhappy meal times.

Anyway, good perspective in the below post by ‘The military wife and mom’.
http://www.themilitarywifeandmom.com/the-day-i-quit-dinner-time-battles/

Lunch box ideas?

School lunch box ideas.

With the school term fast approaching I’ve been thinking of different foods that I can use in my little mans lunch box that are nutritious and yummy.

He is a very fussy eater so coming up with different food ideas that he won’t get ‘bored’ of but foods that will also sustain his hunger, give him energy, are healthy options and are a nice variety.

He is only 3 but is very picky. He used to be a great eater and ate everything I have him, right up until he was about 2.5 years old. Then, like a switch, he ‘didn’t like anything’.

I try many options in his lunch box but the majority of the time, the lunch box comes back with the prepared food still not touched. Such a waste of good, wholesome healthy food.

I’ve tried asking him what he would like to eat. He still won’t eat it. I end up packing things that I know he will eat. Not always the healthiest options but he will eat it.

It makes me question, is it better to feed them what they like and want knowing it will get eaten?

Or pack him what I think is a better and healthier option knowing that it may possibly come back home untouched and know, my little guy went hungry as he didn’t like what was prepared for him?

He isn’t one of those children that sees other children eat and decided he wants to eat the same. He isn’t swayed by peer pressure. He is very head strong and is very confident.

So below are some options that I pack for my little guys preschool lunch box. I’d love to hear what you pack in your little ones lunch boxes.

Vegetable pancakes –
Yes I purée vegetables and put it in a pancake mix then make ‘regular’ pancakes. Great way to hide vegetables as my little man loves pancakes but ‘doesn’t like vegetables’.

Cereal –
I pack either Nutri grain or mini wheats. Yes I know they have sugar, but not as much as Cheerios or fruit loops and many other cereals. My little man will eat both and it’s a good easy way to get him to eat whole grains.

Crackers –
I make home made ones with my ThermoMix, they are quite healthy and really tasty. He eats them plain. If I have made a batch I will pack brown rice crackers or vita wheats. Again he eats them plain. Another easy way to have him eat while grains.

Cheese sticks –
A good source of dairy and protien and they keep well. If I have no cheese sticks I will cut up cubes of cheese. Full day of course.

Yogurt squirts –
I pop these in the freezer the night before school to ensure they stay cold for his lunch box. He will only eat vanilla and that’s fine. It’s another way to get dairy in his lunch box and brewing a squeeze pack, no mess and no need to pack a spoon.

Fruit squeeze pack / jelly squeeze pack –
I know some of you will think SUGAR but, I go for the lowest with no added sugar. He refuses to eat solid fruit even if I cut it up, so this way he is still getting fruit, some fibre and it’s a ‘sweet treat’.
I have tried making my own and using the refillable squeeze packs but he won’t touch them. I’m happy to buy them as its something I know he will eat.

Left over cold meats –
Example of i make mini meatballs for dinner, I will cook extra and pop those into his lunch box. He happily eats them cold. Or an extra sausage. Again if u cut it up he will eat it cold. Or even chicken tenders or home made chicken nuggets. So easy to make, good source or protein and iron and he will eat them cold.

Cold pasta –
Befor you think I’m nuts, it’s easy. I cook either shells or spirals, let them cool and put some in his lunch box. He likes cold pasta. I usually do while grain pasta or spinach. He won’t eat the ‘red’ but I find he doesn’t mind the ‘green’ or ‘brown’. Good carbohydrates and being low GI keeps his energy levels up.

Banana bread fingers –
He thinks it’s cake 😉 occasionally he will eat it. Plain though, no butter and it must be cut in rectangles. I again make my own in my ThermoMix so has almost no sugar and I again make it on half kamut and half wholemeal flour rather than plain white. Kamut flour is high in protein. You could also use chickpea flour.

An alternate in the banana bread fingers could be mini fruit muffins? If you make them yourself you can cut down in the sugar. I know some may question why cutting down on sugar in children.

Well 1 it rots teeth, 2 it can cause health issues and 3 if sugar is not burnt within the body from activity or exercise its stored as fat and our nation is already overweight. I don’t see I big issue in using either natural sugar sources such as fruit over refined sugar and I also think so much food has hidden added sugar that by cutting down on some can not hurt.

I don’t send my little man to school with muesli bars as its a nut free environment. I also don’t like the idea of roll up as its loaded with refined sugar.

I’d love to hear your ideas for fussy eaters that won’t eat a sandwich or cut fruit and vegetables.

Email me :
Noordinarymummy@gmail.com

The butterfly foundation.

This week is body image awareness week and as must of you know, this us something close to my heart.

Having suffered an eating disorder through my teenage years and having friends suffer terribly and a couple die from anorexia it’s an important week for anyone out there going through any firm of eating problems.

My toddler started eating issues at 21 months. Being picky with what he will and won’t eat. Bare in mind he is only 22 months d do it’s been about a month of him saying everything is ‘yucky’ or ‘no mummy’ when presented with good.

Many children all over the world have issues like this and their parents do nothing about it. Some are unaware of these issues, some are too busy to deal with them and others just give up.

With my little one becoming fussy. I wanted to take action early in and get as much information as I can to help him.

I don’t believe he has an eating disorder in any way. After speaking with our paediatrician he assures me that all toddlers go through a phase like this and it’s up to the parents to keep being consistent with introducing new foods to help them overcome thus phase and also to ensure that it doesn’t continue on in later years.

I understand this can be time consuming and frustrating but trust me, although some people may think they the toddler or child doesn’t understand what they are doing and it won’t affect later years, it does and it can.

It can start with not wanting to eat then their stomach shrinks, after the stomach has shrunk it’s hard to stretch again. This is why it’s extremely important to feed your toddler child size meals that are not ‘scary’ looking or so huge that they are overwhelmed. It is important though for them to eat regularly and not skip meals.

You don’t want children ‘scared’ of food.

Food is important to not only nourish your child but for brain development also. You need to feed your body and brain to learn and grow.

I’ve pasted some info below from the Butterfly Foundation website.

The Butterfly Foundation is support for those suffering from any type of eating phobia or disorder.
Body Image and Eating Disorder Awareness Week
#loveyourbody

Body Image and Eating Disorder Awareness Week September 1-7 aims to raise awareness of eating disorders and poor body image in Australia. This year, the theme is Love Your Body and we are encouraging all Australians to take a pledge to making a commitment to learning how to love their bodies.

Eating disorders and body image concerns present a huge problem for both males and females across Australia and it is an issue that is often kept a closely guarded secret by sufferers.

Body Image and Eating Disorder Awareness Week aims to raise awareness of these life threatening conditions and help reduce the stigma associated with eating disorders.

Eating disorders and body image concerns present a huge problem for both males and females across Australia and it is an issue that is often kept a closely guarded secret by sufferers.

Body Image and Eating Disorder Awareness Week aims to raise awareness of these life threatening conditions and help reduce the stigma associated with eating disorders.

There is an enormous lack of knowledge in Australia surrounding negative body image and eating disorders. The reality is that they are extremely common, affecting an increasing number of people each year. In fact, almost 1 in 20 Australians are thought to have an eating disorder. They are not a lifestyle choice, they are not about food and you cannot tell just by looking at someone if they are suffering.

So join us, take the pledge and let’s learn about and celebrate our bodies – unique, diverse, strong and beautiful!

TAKE THE PLEDGE NOW

For more information on fundraising throughout this week, contact info@thebutterflyfoundation.org.au. We would also love to hear back from you on how you will be celebrating Body Image and Eating Disorder Awareness Week! All donations can be made through our website by clicking DONATE NOW.

For information on dealing with poor self-esteem, negative body image and self-harm, click HERE to download Butterfly’s fact sheet which also lists where you can seek help.

Support Line
1800 ED HOPE / 1800 33 4673 Monday–Friday 8am to 9pm AEST or

For more information on the Butterfly Foundation.

http://thebutterflyfoundation.org.au/body-image-and-eating-disorder-awareness-week/

Dealing with a fussy toddler.

So my 17 month old little man has just decided that everything I put in front of him is ‘yuk’ – his words not mine. I’ve tried many recipes that I think he would like but unless he is feeding himself, and let’s face it, messy and takes double the time. It’s all a little bit frustrating. For us both.

I’ve signed up for many newsletters that help with such toddler issues.

A great one that I recently receivEd was from Baby Bliss.

This website has sooo much helpful information on EVERYTHING to do with being a mummy.

The most recent article that I have read from Baby Bliss I’ve pasted below. I hope it’s as informative for you as it has been for me.

Toddlers: Eating, sleeping and Dealing with the NOs

by  on April 15, 2014 in Parenting SeminarsSiblingsToddlers
By nature toddlers are inquisitive, active and designed to push back. They are exploring their world and this can be exciting and frightening to them. We need to support and guide them through this time with effective methods of setting boundaries and discipline while allowing them to develop a sense of themselves.Sleeping

Toddlers can become tricky at bedtime as they can have some increased separation anxiety. They may ask for you to stay with them when falling asleep and then when they wake overnight. Things you can do to change this (if you want to!):

  • Ensure you have a ritual around bedtime
  • Toddlers need lots of good deep sleep so they need to be asleep by 7/7.30pm at the latest.
  • Rather than sit with them till they are asleep go in and out reassuring them that you will be back.
  • Use a night light.
  • Give your toddler a comforter and include that in the bedtime ritual.
  • Use a clock for those toddlers who rise early.
  • Use a reward chart (for 3 year olds and above) to change behaviour but you must be consistent with it.

Eating

Meal times can become a battle ground with toddlers as they start to decide what they do and don’t like. Try not to fight or turn it into a huge production. Remember toddlers are on the go, go, go all the time and so they can eat on the run. They also can eat non-stop one day and then nothing the next. That is normal. Trust that they will know what they need.

  • Keep mealtimes to 30 minutes
  • Don’t offer too much choice as your child will be confused.
  • Ensure they know that this is all there is once the meal is served.
  • Don’t make dessert a reward; it should just be part of the meal.
  • Vegetables should be on the plate every day.
  • Ask that they taste new foods, just once.
  • Try and make mealtimes before your child gets too tired.

Managing Toddler Behaviour

Toddlers can be tricky. It can be the age of tantrums and telling you, “NO!” Try not to take this behaviour personally – you child is discovering themselves as little individuals and testing out ways of being independent from you.

A few little tips can help you navigate through this phase but remember it is okay to say NO to them and it is okay for them to not like you, for that moment!

  • Always use positive language when you’re asking them not to do something this puts the focus on what you DO want them to do and takes the focus off the thing that you don’t want them to do.
  • ‘No’ is an overused word that doesn’t give the child much information. It’s better to tell them what you do want to do, or if there is immediate danger, a better word is “stop” because it gives them information about what you want them to do.
  • Always speak calmly to your child when correcting them or asking them to do something. This shows them you are in-charge and confidant.
  • Try not to lecture – you child will switch-off after the first minute. Be matter-of-fact: “I won’t let you do that. If you throw that again I will take it away”
  • Natural consequences: A toddler learns discipline best when he experiences natural consequences for his behaviour, rather than a disconnected punishment like time-out. If a child throws food, mealtime is over. If a child refuses to get dressed, we don’t go to the park today. These parental responses appeal to your child’s sense of fairness.
  • Personally, I think that smacking is counterproductive because it teaches children that hitting is ok, particularly if you’re angry, and that if you’re bigger and stronger, then you can use force to solve a problem. At the end of the day, we want our kids to use alternative strategies when they have a problem and so we need to model this for them.

 Your children will become who you are, so be who you want them to be.

for other articles like this head to www.babybliss.com.au