Tag Archives: sickness

Being pregnant.

Being pregnant!

So I’m 31 weeks pregnant with my little princess and the count down is on!

I’m extremely excited to meet her and give my little man a sister and my hubby a daughter. The latter is possibly not the most appealing as hubby is worried about having a little girl, mainly her teenage years and how he can contain boyfriends, cosmetics, mood swings etc….. The best is yet to come!

This pregnancy has been similar but also very different to my first. I know they say no two are the same but I thought that possibly they could be, same mum – same dad, how different can it be?

Well to start with, my first notably is a boy and I’m expecting a girl.

Secondly even though I had morning / mourning sickness with my little man it was controllable. This time round I’ve felt terrible most days as have literally vomited every day and at no particular time.

Thirdly I have grown an enormous bottom! I carried my little man mostly in the tummy, yes I was big but at least I was still wearing my normal size pants. Ok no skinny jeans but tights and pants still fitted. This time, no chance! My hips feel double the size and yes they look it also, although my tummy isn’t very big? So I guess it’s true when they say you carry boys in front and girls in the back? (Old wives tale)

Fourth is the weight gain. First time around, I put on 17.5kgs….. This pregnancy I have only gained 9kg. I get that I still have approx 8-9 weeks to go but I can’t really see my self adding another 9kgs in that time frame? Well Id be shocked if I did.

Fifth is the sleep, or lack there of. It seems I get really tired especially as I am a stay at home mummy looking after my beautiful 2 year old boy who is super active and has recently decided to reject his day sleep, so from 6:30am until 6:30pm he is a little firecracker! An absolute ball of energy! However when I try to sleep or rest I seem to get energised.

Sixth, being uncomfortable. With everything! I can’t sit comfortably as my tummy seems to be right up under my nose and literally sits on my lap. Laying down I feel like I have an anchor pulling me to the side and let’s not forget the calf muscle aches and lower back pain. Again nothing like I experienced in my first pregnancy. This one has been tough. Especially the body aches.

Seventh, food and cravings. Mmmm well I don’t really feel like eating and the slightest aroma makes me want to vomit. No particular cravings this time around but first time was all about chocolate flavoured milk and chicken sandwiches on white bread.

Eighth would be the wriggles and movement. Gosh my little guy would wriggle and move all the time, however my little miss only at night. Day time she is quite still, well at least I don’t feel her as much but rest assured, as soon as I’m resting it laying trying to sleep, she wriggles and kicks and moves. Perhaps this is the beginning of her sleeping pattern? Is she going to be a restless or sleepless child? Only time will tell.

Ninth is the funny tastes I get in my mouth, sometimes it’s a metal taste almost like I have pieces of metal in my mouth? Or it can sometimes be the taste of acid, perhaps from the vomiting. Mostly it’s a thick non hungry taste almost like ice eastern too much? Bizzar I know but hard to explain.

I know this probably isn’t painting the best picture of pregnancy but I can guarantee that I will defiantly miss being pregnant. I do love and enjoy my tummy and the movement. The bonding where only I can feel her move. The special bond that only a mother can feel as the baby is in her tummy growing. I missed it with my little man and am sure that I will miss it again.

Although it hasn’t been easy I certainly don’t regret any moment of it. I love being pregnant and knowing that I am growing a human who is so innocent inside me makes me feel blessed.

I’m very much looking forward to the next chapter in my life of being a mummy to my two beautiful children. My little man whom is my prince, my darling, my solider, my best friend, my first child, my only boy, my everything and my little princess awaiting arrival.

She will no doubt be my gorgeous little girl, my darling princess, my best friend, my youngest child, my only daughter, my everything.

One child of each sex is all I need to complete my little family. I feel blessed and fulfilled with absolute happiness and excitement.

How have your pregnancy experiences differed to either mine or with each of your children? Id love to hear your stories. Email me noordinarymummy@gmail.com

Morning sickness!

Morning sickness!

For anyone that has suffered, I feel for you. With my first pregnancy I thought I had it bad. Vomiting, headaches, constantly tired, achy limbs, swollen ankles and that’s just what I remember.

This time around it’s worse! How could it possibly be worse you ask? Well it is. I’m vomiting all day, mostly bile and being graphic it also helps itself out my nose! Still all the body aches and headaches and super tired but hey, I’m growing a baby inside!

So yes, there is my announcement, we are pregnant and although I’m feeling absolutely rotten, I’m blessed and exited and extremely happy that I am having another child. Extending my family and giving my little guy a sibling.

So throughout all my morning sickness I’ve tried multiple remedies and let me say, not much has worked for me.

I’ve tried the dry crackers beside the bed first thing of a morning.

I’ve tried sipping sparkling water.

I’ve tried ginger tablets.

I’ve tried sea sick and travel sick tablets.

I’ve tried sucking ginger.

I’ve tried taking the morning sickness tables.

I’ve even tried maxalon!

Over tried dry toast.

I’ve tried black tea.

Nothing as worked for me.

So what causes morning sickness?

Below is an article by Victorian health that explains why we experience morning sickness and how we can try combat it!

I found it an interesting read, as most of you already know and understand, Morning sickness is caused by the hormones in your body adjusting and growing another little person inside you and with all the change it causes havoc in some women.

I’d love to hear your remedies or morning sickness stories.

Email me – noordinarymummy@gmail.com
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For most women, morning sickness begins around the fourth week of pregnancy and generally goes away around the 12th to 14th week. However, bear in mind one in five pregnant women will suffer morning sickness into their second trimester, and an unfortunate few will also experience nausea and vomiting for the entire duration of their 9 month pregnancy.

In most cases, morning sickness doesn’t harm the woman or the unborn child. However, severe morning sickness that includes weight loss and dehydration needs prompt medical attention. This may also require a drip or even hospitalisation.
Some Symptoms of morning sickness can include:
Nausea
Loss of appetite
Vomiting
Psychological effects, such as depression and anxiety.

The myth of hysteria and morning sickness

Unrelenting morning sickness can have a profound effect on your quality of life, preventing you from working, socialising and looking after your other children.

Pregnant women enduring morning sickness report higher levels of psychological stress, including anxiety and depression. This prompted the false belief that morning sickness is purely psychosomatic, which means that the woman’s fears and anxieties trigger her physical discomfort. However, there is no research to support these claims.

Possible causes of morning sickness

The cause of morning sickness remains a mystery, but it is thought a combination of physical and metabolic factors play a significant role, including:
High levels of hormones, including oestrogen
Fluctuations in blood pressure, particularly lowered blood pressure
Altered metabolism of carbohydrates
The enormous physical and chemical changes that pregnancy triggers.

Morning sickness and your baby

Some women are concerned that the action of vomiting may threaten their unborn baby. Vomiting and retching may strain the abdominal muscles and cause localised aching and soreness, but the physical mechanics of vomiting won’t harm the baby. The fetus is perfectly cushioned inside its sac of amniotic fluid.

Numerous studies have discovered that moderate morning sickness is associated with a reduced risk of miscarriage. However, prolonged vomiting (that leads to dehydration and weight loss) can deprive your child of proper nutrition and increase the risk of your baby being underweight at birth.

If you have nausea and vomiting that will not stop, contact your doctor or midwife.

Severe morning sickness (hyperemesis gravidarum)

Severe morning sickness is known as hyperemesis gravidarum (HG), and can affect around one in 1,000 pregnant women. The symptoms of HG include repeated vomiting, weight loss and dehydration. Treatment usually involves hospitalisation, and the administering of intravenous liquids and nutrition.

The possible complications of untreated hyperemesis gravidarum include:
Electrolyte imbalances
Extreme depression and anxiety
Malnourishment of the fetus
Excessive strain on vital organs, including the liver, heart, kidneys and brain.

Managing morning sickness

Suggestions for coping with morning sickness include:
Don’t take drugs of any kind, unless your doctor knows you are pregnant and has prescribed specific medications.
Eat a few dry crackers or plain sweet biscuits before getting out of bed in the morning.
Don’t eat anything that you suspect will make you nauseous. In general high-carbohydrate meals are well tolerated.
Eat small meals regularly, as an empty stomach tends to trigger nausea.
It may help to avoid cooking or preparing foods.
Drink as much as you can manage. Sometimes sips of flat lemonade, diluted fruit juice, cordial, weak tea, ginger tea, clear soup or beef extract drinks are helpful. If none of these are bearable, try sucking on ice cubes.
Vitamin B6 supplements can be useful, but doses above 200 mg per day can actually be harmful. Follow your doctor’s advice.
Consider acupressure or acupuncture on the wrist.
Wear loose clothes that don’t constrict your abdomen.
Moving around may aggravate morning sickness. Rest whenever possible.

Seeing your doctor about morning sickness

Always seek medical advice if your morning sickness is severe, if you have lost a lot of weight quickly, or if you feel depressed or anxious. Treatment options can include drugs that won’t harm your developing baby.

Where to get help
Your doctor
Maternal and child health nurse

Things to remember
Around half to two-thirds of all pregnant women will experience morning sickness.
Possible causes include high levels of hormones, blood pressure fluctuations and changes in carbohydrate metabolism.
Severe morning sickness, called hyperemesis gravidarum, may require hospitalisation.
Symptoms of morning sickness may be relieved by eating a few dry crackers before you get up in the morning, avoiding foods and smells that make you nauseous, drinking plenty of fluids and choosing high-carbohydrate and high-protein foods.
Better Health Channel

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