Tag Archives: play

Let them play!

This is a great read on letting kids just be kids. I think some of us get caught up in wanting our children to be ‘smart’ or ‘intelligent’ or being ‘ahead’ with their lateral thinking ability.

I think that what we do forget, is that they are only little. Let them play.

I’m not saying that education doesn’t matter, I’m just saying that perhaps we should not be so focused on education over free play. There is no harm in starting our children’s education early, but there are ways it can be done without ‘loosing’ their childhood.

I’m a huge believer in interactive play.

Don’t Let Your Preschoolers Forget How To Play

Playground correctness

I just read this blog on how parents are worried about the perception from their peers about their parenting.

Fear of judgement in what they believe is good or bad parenting.

It got me thinking. So many parents mostly mothers are so worried about being judged for their parenting style or in some cases ‘lack there off’.

Some parents are helicopter parents and don’t allow their children the opportunity to make mishaps. Constantly hovering to correct the child prior to making a mishap. How can they learn if they don’t experience?

This story speaks about mothers who correct the way their children play. Not allowing them to play in dirt or throw sand or even get dirty.

I agree with the writer here. What happened to allowing our children to play and interact with others at playgrounds and parks without interfering?

Yes I believe a parent should step up and observe their child’s play tactics / antics however I also think that children should be allowed to be children and find their own boundaries. Of course to an extent without harming another.

I’m not a believer of taking your child to the park to play so that you can sit with your phone and get on social media. I think it’s very important to play and interact with your child / children however allow them to grow an be children. Remember they are only children for a short time. Let them enjoy their childhood.

I have been the mother that people snarl at or look down upon. I have a 2.5 year old boy who can be quite boisterous. He plays with dirt and uses sticks as swords and can be a little rough at times but i absolutely step in and discipline him if he decides to get too rough or if I see him beginning to get ‘too much’.

I get judged constantly but I’m used to it.

I’m also the mother who apologies to children and their parents if my child hurts or is mean to another and I do also make my child apologise. Perhaps this could be looked at from many perspectives, I could be seen as the ‘don’t care mother’ who allows their child to play freely and use their imagination and interact with the possibility of rough play or I could be seen as the mother of the ‘naughty child’.

Either way, people will always judge, they will always stare and most people will have something to say about another child be it good or bad.

I allow my children to play freely and be active and imaginative. I’m not going to ‘helicopter’ over them and correct them before they do something (unless I know it’s going to be bad) and I want my children to learn their own boundaries (within reason).

This is a great read. Well written and got me nodding whilst I read it. Go ahead – have a read.

http://blog.kinstantly.com/mommy-correctness-on-the-playground/

Sibling arrival.

Sibling arrival.

So how do we cope when number 2 arrives?

My first born is my only boy and is amazing. I never thought I could love another the way that I love him. I think the first born always has you feeling like you make never have enough love to share.

For the first 2.5 years it was he and I. We did everything together and perhaps I doted on him and spoilt him. He was my first born and the love of my life. I was and still am totally besotted by him.

Then number 2 came along. My little princess. I now have 1 of each and feel so blessed. Besotted by both. Amazing how much love you can feel for your children.

However, my little guy now seems so rough and boisterous. How do I deal with this when I have a newborn to protect?

My little man doesn’t understand that newborns require mummy’s attention whilst they are awake including breast feeding. I solely breast feed.

I’ve found these first few months were hard work trying to juggle my little mans needs and feelings while I sat to breastfeed, and my newborn needed the majority of my attention. Just as she would latched on, my little guy would ask to play, and I would find myself snapping, “can you please wait!” I feel so guilty over this but she needs to feed and she certainly doesn’t understand.

He is only 2.5 years old so how does he understand?

For the most part he is amazing. I can put a movie on and he will watch whilst I feed but the past few weeks he has became very demanding of my attention and will climb all over me whilst I’m trying to breastfeed the baby.

I’ve tried a special treat of food or a box of special toys that he is only allowed to play with whilst I breastfeed but neither of these seem to work. He simply wants my attention.

I have sat him down and asked him why he does it. His response was ‘I need my mummy’. It almost broke my heart. I know he needs me and I need him but I can’t help but find myself feeling frustrated with the situation.

I’ve read various blogs and books in dealing with sibling jealousy but am finding nothing seems to work for us.

I don’t like to snap at him and I feel terrible when I do. I can’t lock myself away to feed and when the baby is asleep, he has my undecided attention. We play anything that he wants – which is mostly pirates. I’m feeling a bit lost. What else can I do?

He is only in preschool one day per week and my husband thinks he needs to go more often but again I feel guilty as I’m a stay at home mum. I feel almost like I’m palming him off when he could be home with me?

I’m also a big holder of ‘mummy guilt’ he is the last to be dropped to preschool and the first to be picked up each week, I simply miss my buddy when he is there. I do know he has a great time whilst he is there and that it’s good for him to be social with other children and in a learning environment but I do miss him.

So how do we deal with the arrival of a new sibling?

How do we teach the older child that we still love them as much as ever?

How do we manage the jealousy?

How do we protect the newborn?

How do we time manage?

I thought I had it all under control. Seemingly not. My little man is spoilt, I will and can admit that I have and do spoil him. Perhaps it’s my fault he is lashing out and misbehaving?

Is his behaviour a jealousy thing?

When the baby is asleep he has my undivided attention. We play, we read, we watch movies, we garden, we do everything together.

Why does he feel he needs to misbehave when I’m holding the baby or showing her attention?

Because he was my only child for 2.5years and I allowed him to be the centre of my universe. Perhaps this is my reward? A child who doesn’t understand ‘sharing’ as such yet?

However at 2 years old they don’t yet understand ‘sharing’. They still play side by side at school rather than interact together or shall I say ‘play together’. They are still thinking ‘singular’ and perhaps that to some extent that they are still ‘attached’ to their mother?

All these theories but which one is correct?

It’s interesting as so many people are so quick to pass comment and judge your parenting skills and or techniques.

My thoughts to those who pass comment, especially when they are strangers who don’t know you or your situation – but then does this actually matter? Is who do you think you are to pass comment and or judgment? Are your children the most well behaved in the world?

How do we feel confident in raising our children to be well adjusted, happy, caring, considerate, loving, giving, fair, successful people if we are constantly being judged in our every move?

Children’s Rooms

Setting up a child’s bedroom.

Creating a haven for your little ones to sleep, relax and play can be a challenge at the best of times, however throwing in colour pallets, superhero themes and toy areas can put your head into a spin!

It can be really difficult finding the right balance between the functional and the fun, and evolving the space as your children grow and change.

While sleeping space needs to be calm and quiet, the room should also be fun and have areas that inspire your little a ones creativity and imagination with plenty of storage and space for books, craft and toys.

I often change both my little princess’s nursery and my little mans room around. I personally get board of looking at it the same way each and every day so assume that perhaps so do they?

Why shouldn’t our children have a fun bedroom that they actually enjoy being in that it’s only about ‘sleep time’.

Below I’ve listed a few things to consider when trying to put together the perfect kids room for your little ones:

Get the kids involved – use their favourite colours, gather some of their favourite artworks to display, and make them really feel part of the decision making. That way they are more likely to want to spend time in this space.

Space it out – especially if you are only working with a small space, try to use the space wisely so there are specific areas for both sleep and play. Keep the sleeping space clutter free and away from toys and other distractions is a good idea. Wall shelving can also be a good way to keep ‘special’ items away from harms way.

Create a reading corner – kids who love books will hopefully grow into adults that love books. By creating a little reading corner in one area of the room your essentially creating a space where you can display favourite books, and a dedicated area for quiet time. Tee-pees are great to house the kids treasured items.

Light – while bright or natural lighting is important during the day for play time and homework softer lighting is much more soothing for night time. A night light or lamp is a good idea to have next to or close to the bed for bedtime stories.

Let the imagination run wild – if you keep the basics like the bed or cot neutral, then experiment with bold colours and textures in your artwork, wall decals (removable ones) bed linen, furnishings and toys, make the room fun and easy to excite and delight your children at every age and stage of their lives.

Fathers

Fathers

There are many types of fathers, ones that adore and love their children others that would rather be at the gym or out with their mates having a few drinks or socialising.

I guess I always thought I would be with a man who idolises their children. My father wasn’t always around, he was often never home on a weekend choosing to go play bowls and after work on any given weekday he would come home, shower, change and go to the local RSL and be with his mates to drink and play snooker. He also played snooker in competition a few nights per week which meant he often had quite late nights resulting in us not seeing him as he left for work at approx 6am weekdays as he worked in the local sawmill.

My parents broke up when I was 11 so for me to remember my dad never being around, not only breaks my heart but shows me that from a young age he wasn’t ‘present’ in our lives.

I get that he worked to financially support the family however I don’t believe he ‘needed’ to go out socialising every afternoon after work nor every weekend. I don’t actually remember doing anything as a family with both parents and my older sister and younger brother. I think the only memory I have of a family unit is going camping with a few other family’s one year when I was about 5 or 6 years old, sleeping in tents, bathing in the river and having to use a ‘pit toilet’ which was basically a hole in the ground. Mind you I still enjoy camping but have not used a ‘pit toilet’ since that camping trip when I was only 5 or 6 years old.

Throughout my childhood I always thought and wanted a family that was a ‘unit’ don’t to speak. I saw many of my friends with their family’s and wanted to feel included and I guess was a little jealous that their dads were around and spending quality time with them and doing things as a family.

I know that some men find it hard to bond with children and I certainly understand that some men are just too selfish to spend time with their children that they believe it’s the mothers role to raise the children and run the house whilst the support financially. I also understand that majority of fathers are the main financial supporters therefore work longer hours. No disrespect to working mothers here, just making reference to my upbringing.

My dad was the kind of dad that as children, we were scared of. He was the disciplinary of the house although he wasn’t around much he was all too happy to raise both his voice and his hand at us for even the smallest things like not washing the dishes properly or being a few minutes late home from school. I guess he got this trait from his parents as I remember distinctively his mother chasing my sister and I with an electric jug cord threatening to ‘belt’ us with it as we were 5 minutes late home from School. Both our parents worked and majority of the time we were home alone after school until our father got home at approx 5pm or we had to go to his parents house if either of our parents were going to be late.

These days most fathers are still the main financial income however I also believe that most fathers still want to be part of their children’s lives. Many of my friends have wonderful husbands and partners who are actively involved in their children’s lives. This may include helping with dinner time, bath time, bed and also play.

I also have a handful of friends who’s partners / husbands dont do much with their children. They work late – by choice or go to the gym after work to avoid having to help with the children at dinner or bed time. Some fathers even choose to be out late and only come home after the children are asleep in bed.

These kind of fathers break my heart.

Why do they not want to spend this special time with their little ones?

I understand that children can be hard work but they are also so rewarding
and Children are so young and innocent for such a short period of time why not relish in any time that you can have with them?

Do they not cherish these little things? Or do they just not want part of it?

I once had a male friend say to me ‘I’m not a hands on dad nor will I ever be’ he then Proceeded to say that he and 2 of his other mates are the same and that their wives knew this prior to marrying them and their wives should not expect them to help out with the children. Quote ‘it’s just not in our DNA’.

I was taken aback and quite disgusted that he would say such a thing. Who says this, that isn’t a complete prick?

I would have loved my father to be around more and spend more time with me. Perhaps this is why I do my everything for my little guy and love and cherish every moment with him. I would never ever want him to think that I was a non existent parent. I will also make sure that I’m also very hands on with my daughter who is due in approx 3 months.

This then makes me think, why do men go either way with their parenting style?

Did they have terrible fathers which is why they feel they can behave this way also or that they think being non existent in their children’s lives is normal?

Or perhaps their fathers were that non existent that they are over compensating and being such hands on wonderful fathers to ensure that their children will not think of them in such a way?

There was once an article I read in a newspaper about fathers that suggested there are 4 types.

Enforcer Dad, this is the old-fashioned disciplinarian who is not involved with the day-to-day care of children, but sets clear rules and reprimands.

Entertainer Dad one who sees himself as the joker within the family, and chooses to be the friend rather than a parent.

Useful Dad, willing to help out with day-to-day childcare and household tasks, but still taking his lead from his wife.

Fully Involved Dads, these dads are equally involved with the daily running of the home and family, with the mother and father roles interchangeable.

Can you be both a parent and a friend to your children?

I know a few dads that don’t spend a lot of time with their children but spend a lot of money on them. This isn’t something I agree with as I don’t think gifts equal love. I understand it’s an expression of love however I don’t think anything can compare to your father actually spending quality time with you. Time doesn’t cost a thing but it’s so valuable.

I think yes you can. Children need direction, discipline and love but I think that they will respect you more for being a disciplinary rather than a friend when they are mature enough to understand.

I know that I’m the disciplinary with my little guy. His father works late most nights so I do all the dinner, bath and bed every night. Even on a weekend. I therefore am with him 90% of the time alone and have to be the disciplinary. It can be tiring as they are long days but I actually enjoy doing these things for and with my little guy. I get that this is a sacrifice that my husband makes, missing out on time with our little guy and it saddens me but I am trying my best to raise him the best I can. To raise him to become a gentleman and also a kind, loving, respectful person. He calls me his best friend but I also know that with his tears from the time out and being disciplined he still loves me and hopefully will respect me.

My little guy is 2 and is still learning and asserting himself but I believe in leading by example and if I can be a good parent, I’m hoping I raise good children.

 

2nd wife?

The second wife.

So as with most mums whilst my little one is playing and running around at the park I generally chat to other mummies whilst watching him.

I had this very interesting conversation with the other day with another mummy who like mine, her husband was married before her. She called herself the 2nd wife, which I found an interesting label.

So after swapping stories that my hubby was previously married and that we have 1 child together with another on the way, she also had 1 child with her hubby and they were trying for another we got talking about the strangest label of being ‘the 2nd wife’.

When I asked her why she called herself the 2nd wife her answer was simple and true, because she is the second wife.

Her hubby was married previously. She continued to tell me that it’s not a bad thing and that in fact she see’s it as a positive. She said that lots of men have baggage these days and instead of seeing all the negatives, she focuses on the positives.

So after sharing a few laughs and chatting for about an hour I asked ‘so tell me some of these positives, of being the second wife?’.

Her list began –

He made his mistake with the first one and now knows not to do it again.

He now appreciates it takes 2 to make a marriage work and effort on both sides is required.

He now knows what he wants from a marriage and is willing to work for it.

He know’s what he will and won’t put up with from his wife, yet also understand what is acceptable. No frequent big boozy nights and she isn’t the live in help.

So I thought I’d do some further research.

Now this is no disrespect to those on their first marriage, it may be the only marriage that you have. I myself am in my first marriage. However with divorce rates so high, almost 50% of all marriages end in divorce if both parties are on their first marriage. If one or both are on a second marriage, it drops by almost half. Hmmm interesting statistics, so I needed to look into this further for myself. This is what I found in an article written in the UK Daily Mail.

Couples in second marriages are ‘less likely to get divorced’ because they benefit from the experience of the first.

This study found those on their second union benefit from age and experience, and are more ready to commit. Rather than sliding into a marriage without much thought they will have carefully weighed the pros and cons.

Couples on their second marriage are more likely to stay together as they benefit from the experiences and lessons of the past.

‘One possibility is that higher age is a proxy for higher income. Higher income acts as a buffer against some of the everyday difficulties faced by most couples.

‘Another possibility is that higher age means there are fewer young children from prior relationships. ‘And fewer second marriages for men are subject to the social and family pressures that lead into some first marriages. Hence men tend to do better second time round.’

Relationship expert Dr Pam Spurr said that while previous statistics have shown that second marriages break down more quickly, maturity may well aid to save a second marriage.

She added the second marriages can be particularly problematic when there are children from both previous marriages.

And Relate counsellor Paula Hall pointed out that money can be tighter in a second marriage due to divorce settlements and child support payments etc so their is more strain on finances within the second marriage however knowing the respect for each other and working together maturely, issues like these can be resolved. It’s been days that second marriages are less expectant on materialistic things and focus more on inner love and happiness.

But she added: ‘People in second marriages seem to have more insight and self-awareness. Having gone through divorce and separation, there can be more motivation to work through problems and save the marriage.’

Are you on your second marriage?

Do you have any insight on marriage?

I’d love to hear your stories.

Noordinarymummy@gmail.com

School Holiday Fun!

Fun for your little ones.

Which school holidays here, I often find parents, friends and children wondering what to do.

Weather they are looking for at home fun or fun away on holidays everyone seems to want to do something.

Not just school holiday periods either, I’m often asked for tips on ideas for occupying children of all ages. So here are my top few.

If you have some ideas you would like to share, please email me, I’d love to hear from you. Noordinarymummy@gmail.com

If you live in Sydney – as I do, are are happy to spend some cash.

Taronga Zoo
SEA LIFE Sydney Aquarium
Sydney Olympic Park
Powerhouse Museum
Luna Park Sydney
I fly down under

For those wanting to save cash or simply wanting to stay home but still have fun. Yes this can be done!

Go to the library – stay for story time

Bake something, anything a cake, cookies, whatever is in your pantry

Construct something with blocks or Lego’s

Read a book

Paint with water, get old brushes and paint on either the ground or on old newspapers

Draw/Color together

Host a play date with their favorite friend

Dress Up together

Build a go kart

Go swimming (indoor or outdoor, river, beach or pool)

Have a picnic (outside or on the living room floor!)

Listen to new music together

Do karaoke, you can ever use a hair brush as your microphone

Visit a museum

Visit a Zoo

Visit a pet store

Write and mail a letter to someone special

Play a card or board game

Take a walk

Get out baby photos and talk about them

Sing Songs

Take a class together at local art center

Go roller or ice skating together

Tell stories about when your child was a baby

Hug/hold your child

Build a blanket fort over yoir lounge or dining room

Tell your child what makes them special ( to you and others)

Teach/tell your child about your job – take them to work for a day if you can

Have a scavenger hunt (indoor or outdoor)

Go to a movie together

Visit your child at school

Dig out your year book and share about your experiences

Visit a nursing home or hospital

Finger Paint

Take pictures

Visit and learn about places in your neighborhood (fire station, police station, post office, dairy, etc.)

Clean out a room together (basement, attic, garage)

Work a puzzle together

Plan a vacation together – then GO!

Build a bird house

Play a sport together

Rake leaves and play/jump in them

Visit an apple orchard / pumpkin patch or any orchard and offer your help

Plant something

Have a water fight

Play hide and seek

Collect different leaves, rocks or sticks from around your home

Have a block party – invite your neighbours over for afternoon tea or a play or a BBQ

Take a hike, go for a walk, explore your community

Make puppets and put on a show for each other – these can be made from old socks with buttons for yes and simple wool thread as a mouth

Tell stories about your childhood

Attend a local athletic event

Learn about different cultures – get on the internet or read books

Take flowers to a friend

Go for a train ride

Go horseback riding

Climb a tree

Go camping

Have a family talent show

Draw a map and have a treasure hunt

Walk/play in the rain

Talk about feelings/emotions

Paint a picture by numbers together

Go to a theater performance

Complete a DIY project together

Wash the car

Play Frisbee

Pick up litter in your community

Fly a homemade kite

Jump rope

Exercise together

Have running races around your backyard or in a local park

Discuss your child’s favourite foods and then chat about nutrition and the 4 basic food groups

Start a savings account – talk about budgeting and saving money – very beneficial for their later years

Write a story (draw illustrations together too!)

Go fishing

Visit a relative

Visit the neighbors

Go bowling

Have an at home dance party!

Play Simon Says

Have letter or color of the week and look for them together – ie green grass

Play “I Spy”

Act out a favorite story together

Play charades

Listen to music and play homemade instruments together – this can be as wild as your imagination will allow. Use old cling wrap tubes for the base of a guitar, an old tissue box for the base of guitar then draw on the strings. Don’t forget to use cotton tips or cotton balls for the tuning 😉

Start a gratitude journal with your child – they can draw what they are thankful for

Let your child pick out the menu for a meal then get them involved in helping to prepare and cook the meal

Start a collection – stamps, rocks or buttons, what is of interest

Practice/teach something (reading, tying shoes, zipping zipper, sports, rhyming, sorting, telling time)

Draw with chalk on your driveway or footpath – it washes away with either a hose down it bucket of water

Go for a bike ride

Play pretend

Make a collage out of photos and/or clippings of their favorite things

Tell jokes

Spend time simply LISTENING to them.

Make a list of things you want to do together in the future!

Other fun craft ideas can be found at-
http://www.tinyme.com/blog/10-crafty-cardboard-ideas/?utm_campaign=blog-10-cardboard-crafts&utm_medium=social&utm_source=Facebook&utm_content=photo-wall&utm_term=2014-7-10
For more ideas on what to do in Sydney, click the link below.
http://www.sydney.com/things-to-do/family-holidays/top-attractions-for-kids

Parenting whilst distracted.

Parenting whilst distracted.

I’ve previously written an article on a similar subject but I feel very strongly about it and recently read a very informative article by an extremely reputable paediatric specialist. This was also on SBS recently so I felt I needed to share this information from someone who does know what they are talking about.

Their words are easy to understand and this makes absolute sense to me.

I’m not saying there is no place for technology, we live in a very technologically advanced world, however what I am saying, is that there is a time and place for it.

Our children are only young once. Enjoy the time.

Have a read and let me know your thoughts.

Parenting while distracted.
I’ve been a pediatrician for 20 years, and I thought I’d seen it all. But not long ago, when a father brought his 2-year-old into my clinic, something happened that has me deeply concerned.
Written By Jane Scott
Source The Washington Post
11 AUG 2014 –

I’ve been a pediatrician for 20 years, and I thought I’d seen it all. But not long ago, when a father brought his 2-year-old into my clinic, something happened that has me deeply concerned.

Upon entering my examining room, I found father and son sitting together, eyes downcast, each silently scrolling and tapping on smartphones. During my initial exam, the father directed most of my questions to his frowning toddler, who indicated that his ears hurt, and I quickly discovered that both eardrums were red and inflamed.

“Guess what?” I said to my small patient. “Your ears hurt because you have an ear infection. But we can give you medicine and make you better.” I smiled at the little boy and his father. Immediately, the child picked up his phone and pushed a button. “Siri,” he asked carefully. “What ear ‘fection?”

At age 2, a few minutes on a smartphone isn’t a big deal; screen time is a part of growing up today, and most parents try to set appropriate limits. But when a child so young turned to a machine for information instead of to his father, it made me wonder: Just how limited was his parents’ screen time? What I saw was modeled behavior — a child who has learned that when he has a question, Siri, and not Dad, is most readily available with an answer.

It’s hard to say for sure based on this one moment, but there can be no doubt about the larger trend: Parents today are probably the most informed and involved generation in history. And, yet, in the company of their children, they often act as though they’d rather be someplace else. That’s what they’re saying when they break eye contact to glance at their push notifications or check Facebook when they think their child’s distracted. The parents are present, their attention is not.

In my practice, I see evidence every day of how such inattention affects kids. It’s expressed in temper tantrums and separation anxiety, and older children who resist discipline. Most parents are taught that this is all normal, that children are biologically wired this way. Not exactly. Yes, all of this is normal attention-getting behavior, but it often is preventable.

Consider the results of a March study by researchers from Boston Medical Center who carefully observed caregivers and children at fast-food restaurants. Out of 55 caregivers, 40 used their mobile devices, and their absorption was such that their “primary engagement was with the device, rather than the child.” In many cases, the caregivers expressed irritation when the children tried to get their attention. One observer watched a woman push a small boy away as he took her face in his hands in an attempt to get her to look up from her tablet.

It’s possible all those adults were following an urgent work email thread. More likely, they were on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest. A 2011 Nielsen poll found that people with children use social media more than those without. Maybe these adults were reading an article shared by another parent. Maybe they were making plans with friends and family. But they were definitely communicating to their children that they were less important than whatever was on those devices.

This might seem absurd to today’s parents, who feel like they give themselves to their children in ways previous generations never imagined. But the undivided attention that children need from us is in jeopardy. Most people just don’t realize how much time they’re spending online; what feels like a few minutes is often a half hour or more. When we are with our children, we need to be with our children — not with them except for the part of us that’s reading emails, tweeting and checking Facebook.

Another reason for parents to put down their phones: Though Facebook may provide community, it can also promote competition and unreachable standards of perfection. Through Facebook, we read an endless litany of our friends’ boasts about their children. It’s enough to make a person wonder what she’s doing wrong because her child prefers plain pasta over the curry special or “Old MacDonald” to Chopin. Though most parents would say they’re not competitive in this way, many worry privately that they might be short-changing their kids.

Social media has a place and a purpose, but too many parents are creating unnecessary stress by trying to be in two places at once, while modeling to their children that online relationships take precedence over real ones. In an era of constant distraction, we must decide what’s more important: heeding the constant ping of our devices or telling our children, in word and deed, “I am listening. I am here. And there’s nowhere else I’d rather be.”

Mums in the east.

Mums in the east!

For those who follow my blog you will know I live in Sydney. There are always so many things to do to prohibit boredom in this wonderful city but sometimes it can be overwhelming choosing just what to do.

Here is an amazing website that helps you to choose what best suits you and your families needs.

Very easy to navigate and comprehensive with lots of helpful tips on where to play, where to eat, what is kiddie friendly, where to shop and most important for me, where to get the best morning coffee! 🙂

Written for mums (and dads) by a mummy herself!

http://www.mumsintheeast.com.au/about.html#.U9LZa4wwH-Y.facebook

 

Easy peasy play doh!

No Cook Play Dough

2 cups plain flour
1 cup salt
1 tablespoon cooking oil
½-1 cup cold water
2 drops food colouring

Method

Combine plain flour and salt
Add water and oil.
Mix until ingredients are combined.
Knead well.
If consistency is too wet add a little plain flour.
If too dry add dribbles of water until you gain the desired consistency.

Divide the play dough into 4 large balls and make each ball a different colour using the food colour. Remember adding more colour will deepen the colour of your dough.
This is a quick and easy recipe that kids can help make as well as play with.

This can be stored wrapped in cling wrap or in an air tight container.

Play dough can dry very easily and quickly so if it does simply throw away and make some more 🙂

If you like you can also use cookie cutters and make shapes to use as trinkets or decorations.

Just remember if these are hanging decorations to add a hole at the top prior to baking so that a string or ribbon can be tied through once cooled.

To make dried decorations place your dough cut in shapes on a baking try and place in a hot oven approx 200 degrees for 20 minutes.

Have fun!