Tag Archives: obstetrician

New year – new you?

New year, new you? Ummm maybe but shouldn’t we be more focused on continuity?

I know that most New Years resolutions are to ‘loose weight’ ‘get fit’ ‘tone up’ etc. however I prefer to try and not follow ‘dad’ diets but continue to eat and live healthy throughout the year.

Yes I know it’s easier said than done, but rest assured if you don’t give yourself a time limit or try to convince yourself it’s a ‘new resolution’ you will generally be able to stick to it.

Now I had my second baby 7 months ago and have recently started to ‘work out’ again. Not because I’m trying to loose baby weight as such. I’m not as I’m fortunate enough that my baby weight was easily shifted. With what I believe helped was breast feeding and generally eating healthy throughout my pregnancy.

I did however still gain 17kg but I managed to loose it all within the first 3 months. My body shape had however changed. I’m more curvy now and my hips are defiantly wider. I’m back to my pre pregnancy weight and in most of my pre pregnancy clothing but I will admit they do fit differently and my jeans are tighter in the hips and bottom and yup – I have muffin top! But I haven’t been too stressed about it. I’m more concerned with keeping my milk supply for my baby girl and also being healthy for my own well being.

So having recently joined the gym to gain some fitness back I’m doing low impact exercises. Things such as body balance class, Pilates on a mat and yoga. I’ve also started with a personal trainer once per week focusing on more core and inner strength training.

Since exercising again I find that I have more energy and feel better as a mother, wife and person.

I used to train a lot, right up until I fell pregnant with my little man who recently turned 3. I trained every day – 7 days per week for about 2 hours per day mainly weight with about 30 minutes cardio and 15 minutes stretching.

It was hard for me to fall pregnant and I had complications with both my pregnancies so with my first my obstetrician suggested I do light exercise only which I basically quit the gym and only did light walking. I found that if I went too quickly I would get cramping and a ‘stitch’ like feeling in my tummy and groin area so I didn’t want to push my body.

Every one is different though and most can continue to exercise without any issues however listen to your body and also seek medical advice if your concerned.

Whilst on holiday I came across this article with some very good exercises which can be done anywhere any time.

I’m big on using your own body weight as your resistance and I’m also a big believer in listening to your body and only doing what your comfortable with.

Check out this link. Great exercises. Easy to do. You can do them anywhere, and perhaps like me, after the little ones go to bed and you have a spare 30-45 minutes to yourself.

I know it may not seem appealing to exercise at the end of the day as your possibly tired from looking after your little ones, or perhaps just a long day at work. BUT trust me when I say the endorphins will kick in and after a few days of exercising. Your body will feel great and your energy levels will be higher.

Go on, give it a go!

Good luck!

http://www.self.com/fitness/workouts/2016/01/bodyweight-moves-get-in-shape/?mbid=social_facebook_selffitness

She is here!

For all my loyal readers I want to apologies for my lack of posts lately.

I’ve been a little pre occupied of and I hope that you understand why, my little princess arrived 3 weeks early!

It has been a whirlwind of emotion and I am yet again besotted.

I thought I knew what love was when approx 2.5years ago I welcomed my gorgeous lil man into this world.

Today I feel absolutely besotted, proud, fulfilled and over joyed with love and happiness all over again.

My lil family is now complete.
Two precious little cherubs to love, adore, enjoy, watch grow and protect for forever more.

Let me take you through my journey.

I had been on weekly ultrasounds and checkups with my midwife as my little miss was measuring small. On the lower 10th percentile on the growth chart which had our midwife and obstetric is slightly concerned.

Now hubby not myself are big units however our amazing little man was born 3.53kg and 53cm long. Our lil miss was measuring approx 2.3kg. Quite a big difference.

After my ECG – where they turned my little princess successfully she engaged straight away, I was displayed though however at that time, I could have dilated easily as my cervix was apparently ‘ripe’ and ‘soft’.

Going back to those past 2 weeks, I had my regular weekly ultrasound on the Tuesday followed by my midwife appointment on the Thursday. After the appointment I had a CTG which is a monitor that listens to the baby’s heart. My little miss had a strong healthy and regular heart beat which was reassuring.

She was still measuring small so I then went onto daily check ups. So with my little man, packed up for a few hours we were in the hospital room. Mummy hooked up to these monitoring machines to check little miss and my little man – who was so well behaved, watching a DVD and snacking.

After being monitored for 6 days straight we were advised that our little miss hadn’t grown within 2 weeks, not gained any weight nor had her head or stomach circumference had changed and that the best and safest option would be an induction.

The induction was set for 3pm on Wednesday. I had my bag packed my little miss’s bag packed and my mother had came to stay with my little man.

I was filled with various emotion as id never left my little man before for any longer than 10 hours. So leaving him over night I was heart broken. I was however exited that the time has come to meet my little girl.

After getting the brief on how I was going to be induced I was feeling very nervous.

The obstetrician decided that cervadil was going to be the better option as its a slow release. Releasing 2mg of the induction drug every 6 hours over a 12 hour period. A long process but as my lil miss was small they didn’t want complications and wanted it to be as stress free as possible. Well that didn’t really happen….

After the cervadil was inserted approx 2 hours later my contractions started.

They were quite intense and were lasting a few minutes each time and approx 15 minutes apart. With this I got cramps down my right leg and in my right bottox cheek – very painful. The contractions were coming on closer and closer then at 10pm after 5 hours of fast intense contractions my little miss was distressed and her heart was beating irregular.

They had to stop the labor and calm her. They took the cervadil out and I was put on a drip and given morphine to stop the contractions as I was also still not dilating. I was told to rest over night and they would try again in the morning.

I was quite exhausted and tried my best to sleep but was being constantly monitored and slept with the CTG machine on me which also limited my comfort level but that was nothing as I wanted what was best for my little girl.

The next morning the midwife and obstetrician decided that perhaps the best thing to do would be to break my waters and see how my body reacts and if I dilate that way.

Well at 9:25am my waters were broken and within 15 minutes I was in full on contractions again.

The contractions were lasting over 3 minutes and were only 2 minutes apart. Very fast and very intense. They became faster and longer and closer together. The whole labor only lasted 2 hours as my little miss was born at 11:25am.

As the contractions were so intense I had no time for pain relief. I had gas only. Which helped a little but as the contractions were so intense I struggled to breath and catch my breath so was also ‘blacking out’ due to the pain. Within the 2hours that I was in labour, my husband recalls me blanking out 4 times.

I also hemoraghed and lost a great amount of blood that required me to have 6 bags of fluid administered via a drip followed by a iron infusion that took over 6 hours via a drip. They considered a blood transfusion but we’re hoping that the fluids would work, which they did.

My little miss was born at 1.88kg and 44.5cm long. Teeny tiny but healthy! Yay!

I was exhausted and felt completely out of it, my little miss was also exhausted as she was so small she was tube fed for the first 3 days. I expressed my breast milk and it was syringed into a tube that went down her nose.

I felt relived that she was ok and born strong and healthy however also was upset that she was tube fed. It was for the best though and did only last 3 days.

After 5 nights in the hospital we were discharged and allowed home. Back with my little man and husband. Back into my comfort zone and able to settle into my family of 4.

I feel so complete and in love. I have these 2 amazing children whom I love more than imaginable. No words to describe the happiness or fulfilment that I have for these 2 little people.

Since being home my baby girl has had continual weight gain and is now 2.14kg her 00000 clothing is too big but she is going to grow into them.

Stay tuned and I promise to write again soon.

Ovarian cysts!

Ovarian cysts

My husband and I have been trying for a new baby. Very exciting news. I’ve always wanted 2 children and having a gorgeous little boy who is my world and whom I totally adore has been the best gift ever to me.

As most know, I had various issues with falling pregnant with my little guy and since trying for another I’m experiencing similar issues.

A few weeks ago I went in clomid to assist with ovulating. No luck 🙁 I went to have a blood test to just make sure things are ok.

Unfortunately they are not. I have high levels of testosterone and am not ovulating. I was then sent for an ultrasound. This came back with more horrible news. I have am ovarian cyst the size of an egg on my right ovary. Along with the continual blows, I inly have 14 follicles on my left Fallopian tube and 7 on my right. Most women have hundreds.

So here we go again with fertility issues.

Since finding out all this information I’ve been doing research on both ovarian cysts and follicles. Below is what I’ve found.
Ovarian Cysts and Tumors

The ovaries are two small organs located on either side of the uterus in a woman’s body. They make hormones, including estrogen, which trigger menstruation. Every month, the ovaries release a tiny egg. The egg makes its way down the fallopian tube to potentially be fertilized. This cycle of egg release is called ovulation.

What causes ovarian cysts?
Cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can form in the ovaries. They are very common. They are particularly common during the childbearing years.

There are several different types of ovarian cysts. The most common is a functional cyst. It forms during ovulation. That formation happens when either the egg is not released or the sac — follicle — in which the egg forms does not dissolve after the egg is released.

Nearly 60 Percent of Uterine Cancer Cases Preventable: Report
Other types of cysts include:

Polycystic ovaries. In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the follicles in which the eggs normally mature fail to open and cysts form.

Endometriomas. In women with endometriosis, tissue from the lining of the uterus grows in other areas of the body. This includes the ovaries. It can be very painful and can affect fertility.
Cystadenomas. These cysts form out of cells on the surface of the ovary. They are often fluid-filled.

Dermoid cysts. This type of cyst contains tissue similar to that in other parts of the body. That includes skin, hair, and teeth.

What causes ovarian tumors?
Tumors can form in the ovaries, just as they form in other parts of the body. If tumors are non-cancerous, they are said to be benign. If they are cancerous, they are called malignant. The three types of ovarian tumors are:

Epithelial cell tumors start from the cells on the surface of the ovaries. These are the most common type of ovarian tumors.

Germ cell tumors start in the cells that produce the eggs. They can either be benign or cancerous. Most are benign.
Stromal tumors originate in the cells that produce female hormones.
Doctors aren’t sure what causes ovarian cancer. They have identified, though, several risk factors, including:

Age — specifically women who have gone through menopause
Smoking
Obesity
Not having children or not breastfeeding (however, using birth control pills seems to lower the risk)
Taking fertility drugs (such as Clomid)
Hormone replacement therapy
Family or personal history of ovarian, breast, or colorectal cancer (having the BRCA gene can increase the risk)

What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts and tumors?

Often, ovarian cysts don’t cause any symptoms. You may not realize you have one until you visit your health care provider for a routine pelvic exam. Ovarian cysts can, however, cause problems if they twist, bleed, or rupture.

If you have any of the symptoms below, it’s important to have them checked out. That’s because they can also be symptoms of ovarian tumors. Ovarian cancer often spreads before it is detected.

Symptoms of ovarian cysts and tumors include:

Pain or bloating in the abdomen
Difficulty urinating, or frequent need to urinate
Dull ache in the lower back
Pain during sexual intercourse
Painful menstruation and abnormal bleeding
Weight gain
Nausea or vomiting
Loss of appetite, feeling full quickly
How do doctors diagnose ovarian cysts and tumors?

The obstetrician/gynecologist or your regular doctor may feel a lump while doing a routine pelvic exam. Most ovarian growths are benign. But a small number can be cancerous. That’s why it’s important to have any growths checked. Postmenopausal women in particular should get examined. That’s because they face a higher risk of ovarian cancer.

How do doctors diagnose ovarian cysts and tumors? continued…
Tests that look for ovarian cysts or tumors include:

Ultrasound. This test uses sound waves to create an image of the ovaries. The image helps the doctor determine the size and location of the cyst or tumor.

Other imaging tests. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) are highly detailed imaging scans. The doctor can use them to find ovarian tumors and see whether and how far they have spread.

Hormone levels. The doctor may take a blood test to check levels of several hormones. These include luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol, and testosterone.

Laparoscopy. This is a surgical procedure used to treat ovarian cysts. It uses a thin, light-tipped device inserted into your abdomen. During this surgery, the surgeon can find cysts or tumors and may remove a small piece of tissue (biopsy) to test for cancer.
CA-125. If the doctor thinks the growth may be cancerous, he might take a blood test to look for a protein called CA-125. Levels of this protein tend to be higher in some — but not all — women with ovarian cancer. This test is mainly used in women over age 35, who are at slightly higher risk for ovarian cancer.

If the diagnosis is ovarian cancer, the doctor will use the diagnostic test results to determine whether the cancer has spread outside of the ovaries. If it has, the doctor will also use the results to determine how far it has spread. This diagnostic procedure is called staging. This helps the doctor plan your treatment.

How are ovarian cysts and tumors treated?

Most ovarian cysts will go away on their own. If you don’t have any bothersome symptoms, especially if you haven’t yet gone through menopause, your doctor may advocate ”watchful waiting.” The doctor won’t treat you. But the doctor will check you every one to three months to see if there has been any change in the cyst.

Birth control pills may relieve the pain from ovarian cysts. They prevent ovulation, which reduces the odds that new cysts will form.

Surgery is an option if the cyst doesn’t go away, grows, or causes you pain. There are two types of surgery:

Laparoscopy uses a very small incision and a tiny, lighted telescope-like instrument. The instrument is inserted into the abdomen to remove the cyst. This technique works for smaller cysts.

Laparotomy involves a bigger incision in the stomach. Doctors prefer this technique for larger cysts and ovarian tumors. If the growth is cancerous, the surgeon will remove as much of the tumor as possible. This is called debulking. Depending on how far the cancer has spread, the surgeon may also remove the ovaries, uterus, fallopian tubes, omentum — fatty tissue covering the intestines — and nearby lymph nodes.

Other treatments for cancerous ovarian tumors include:

Chemotherapy — drugs given through a vein (IV), by mouth, or directly into the abdomen to kill cancer cells. Because they kill normal cells as well as cancerous ones, chemotherapy medications can have side effects, including nausea and vomiting, hair loss, kidney damage, and increased risk of infection. These side effects should go away after the treatment is done.

Radiation — high-energy X-rays that kill or shrink cancer cells. Radiation is either delivered from outside the body, or placed inside the body near the site of the tumor. This treatment also can cause side effects, including red skin, nausea, diarrhea, and fatigue. Radiation is not often used for ovarian cancer.

Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation may be given individually or together. It is possible for cancerous ovarian tumors to return. If that happens, you will need to have more surgery, sometimes combined with chemotherapy or radiation.

The ovaries contain eggs (which formed in the ovary during childhood) and these are matured by the ovary (usually one at a time) in follicles which then come to the surface of the ovary and burst to release the egg into the top of the fallopian tube.

Thus if multiple follicles have been detected in an ovary, that ovary is developing more than one egg at a time – this can result non identical twins.

Usually only one follicle is developed to maturity at a time but it is possible to stimulate the ovary to produce more (using hormones) as part of interventions relating to infertility treatments.

Antral follicles are small follicles (about 2-8 mm in diameter) that we can see – and measure and count – with ultrasound. Antral follicles are also referred to as resting follicles. Vaginal ultrasound is the best way to accurately assess and count these small structures.

Many fertility specialists believe that the antral follicle counts (in conjunction with female age) are the best tool that we currently have for estimating a woman’s remaining fertility potential (or ovarian reserve). Ovarian volume measurements (also done by ultrasound), and day 3 FSH and AMH levels (blood tests) are additional studies that can help.

Presumably, the number of antral follicles visible on ultrasound is indicative of the relative number of microscopic (and sound asleep) primordial follicles remaining in the ovary. Each primordial follicle contains an immature egg that can potentially develop in the future.

In other words, when there are only a few antral follicles visible, there are far less eggs remaining as compared to when there are many more antral follicles visible. As women age, they have less eggs (primordial follicles) remaining – and they have less antral follicles visible on ultrasound. Therefor lower chances of falling pregnant.