Tag Archives: learning

Let them play!

This is a great read on letting kids just be kids. I think some of us get caught up in wanting our children to be ‘smart’ or ‘intelligent’ or being ‘ahead’ with their lateral thinking ability.

I think that what we do forget, is that they are only little. Let them play.

I’m not saying that education doesn’t matter, I’m just saying that perhaps we should not be so focused on education over free play. There is no harm in starting our children’s education early, but there are ways it can be done without ‘loosing’ their childhood.

I’m a huge believer in interactive play.

Don’t Let Your Preschoolers Forget How To Play

Helping your child deal with frustrations.

Such a great read!

My little guy can become frustrated and angry, he is only 3, and as a result he ‘flips out’.

This is a result of many things.

– The fact that he cannot articulate his feelings at this stage. He doesn’t really know what he is feeling except happy or angry or sad. ‘Feelings’ are generally acknowledged around age 5/6.

– He cannot control his emotions properly. This is something that is generally learnt around 4/5 years old.

– He could be feeling overwhelmed.

– He may be overtired. I don’t always know if he is waking through the night. A disruptive sleep can make anyone short tempered.

– Hunger. He could be having a ‘growth spurt’ and may very well be hungry. Or he could be too busy playing or doing something that he doesn’t eat enough. We can only monitor so much so if he isn’t eating properly he may not be able to deal with various situations. I know I’m I’m hungry. I can get angry and not even realise!

A great tip that I’ve learnt from this article to help children deal with anger and frustration is creating a ‘Mad List’. I’ve copied the paragraph from this article explaining ‘Mad List’. Very easy to do and I think, would be useful.

Mad list – When my son was younger, a mad list was the secret to helping him vent his frustration. Young children need to vent (just like adults), but they don’t yet know how to do that. Screaming and flailing feels good in the moment, so they go with what works.

Ask your child to name all of the things that make him mad. Write down his list on a piece of paper while he vents his emotions. Provide empathy and understanding while you do this. Kids need to feel understood, and a simple, “Ooh, that makes me mad, too!” shows that you get it. Once the list is complete, ask your child to tear it into tiny pieces (this provides a much needed physical release of emotion) and throw them in the air. Then collect the pieces together and throw them out for good.

Go on. Do yourself a favour, click on this link and have a read.
You may already use these strategies.
You may have already heard of them.
If you haven’t, perhaps try them?
If you already use them, how have they worked for you?

Id love to hear your experiences and thoughts on these.

http://www.pbs.org/parents/expert-tips-advice/2016/02/teach-frustration-tolerance-kids/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=pbsparents&utm_campaign=parents_expert

My life as a mummy of two!

My life as a mummy of two!

So settling into being a mummy of two has been challenging. Loving it, but challenging.

Experiencing the love all over again, smelling and absorbing my new born and still being everything I can be for my 2 year old.

My 2 year old has been a little jealous and understandably. He has had his mummy all to himself for the past 2.5years, now all of a sudden he has to share his mummy and it hasn’t been an easy adjustment for him.

Throughout my pregnancy I was trying to help him adjust, I bought books about becoming a big brother, books about expecting a baby and we would chat about how he is getting a little sister and that it’s very special for both him and her.

I thought he would be a little jealous but I guess I wasn’t prepared for the huge change in him.

Firstly my little man used to be a fairly good sleeper. After night nurses and reward charts I had managed to get him to go down approx 6pm in his own bed, we would read 3 books then it was lights off. My little man would then sleep through in his own big boy bed until approx 6am the next morning.

Since I was in hospital for over a week my husband and mother were looking after my little man. His routine wasn’t really followed and for a few weeks he didn’t like to go to bed and wasn’t sleeping through, waking multiple times per night and insisting on sleeping with me and leaving his bedside lamp on.

The first few nights I was really strict and walked him back to his room, comforted him and helped him to go back to sleep but after 5 nights of the same behaviour I began to feel bad and allowed him to come into my bed and sleep with me.

Mainly because it’s a huge adjustment and in between feeding my little girl every 2.5 hours I have been pretty tired. Also secretly I love snuggling with him and he is my little man, my first born and always will be.

This phase only lasted approx 3 weeks though and now he is happy to go to his own bed, he isn’t sleeping through every night, however most nights he does, and if he doesn’t he is only waking once or twice and I carry him back to his room and he goes back to sleep.

He is really sweet with his sister and is quite protective and loving towards her. If he hears her cry he will come straight to me and tell me she is upset and he also runs to her room and says in the sweetest little voice ‘you ok Mila?’

He also loves to help me change her nappy and I allow him to choose her outfits. I want him to feel involved and part of her life. Although he is only 2.5years old I think that by allowing him to be a big part in the decisions around her will help him to adjust and accept her more easily and not have him be as jealous or feel left out or pushed aside.

My little girl though is a different story, she sleeps very well and I actually wake her to feed. During the day I’m feeding every 3 hours however of a night I let her sleep and she wakes me. She is only 3 weeks old though and I anticipate that this may change.

The dynamic in the house has also changed, it feels complete now. I feel like I’m whole. My little man and my little princess have completed me, of course with my husband. 🙂 I was once told that to have one child of each sex is a ‘gentleman’s family’ or a ‘pigeon pair’ which is apparently quite well looked upon in the eyes of some. I feel blessed that I have been able to create this little family with my husband and also be able to give him a child of each sex.

Being a parent is a constant lesson, I’m always learning more about myself but also about my children. I’m feeling very blessed at this stage in my life.

I’m sure with each step and change in growth patterns with my 2 children things within our home will change also with dynamics and learning. I look forward to sharing these moments with you.

Inexpensive games for babies & toddlers!

Fun inexpensive games for babies and toddlers.

Baby Games Idea #1: Peekaboo

Peekaboo is an easy and inexpensive game that will provide hours of fun for your baby. With younger babies, try hiding your face behind your hands, that way they she still knows you’re there. You can use fabrics and materials to cover your face too. In time, your baby will learn to pull back the fabric to find you. As they get older and begin to understand object permanence, you’ll be able to leave the room and jump back in shouting “Peekaboo!”. Funny faces and voices add extra layers of enjoyment to this game. My little guy loves this and plays it around corners in our home and out in the garden hiding behind plants etc. it’s a great game for all ages.
Baby Games Idea #2: Where Has Toy Gone?

This game can be played with any toy, it doesn’t have to be big nor small, perhaps your little ones favorite toy. Take the toy and display it for your baby, then take some material and cover up the toy. Then try and find it again. This game teaches your baby about object permanence. As your baby grows older, they will begin to understand that objects still exist, even if she can’t see them. When they have worked this out, they will start to pull back the material to find the missing toy. They may even hide the toy for you to find too.

Baby Games Idea #3: Sensory Time

This game can be altered and repeated as many times as you like. All you need is a muffin baking tray, and a handful of objects to put in it. Be careful not to choose anything small that could be a choking hazard. You don’t need to buy any fancy objects for this game, just everyday items from around your house will do. Empty toilet rolls, dried pasta, frozen peas, large beads, leaves from the garden, washing up sponges, ping pong balls and plastic spoons would all make great items for this game. Simply divide your chosen items amongst the muffin tray, and let your baby explore. Your baby will enjoy mouthing, touching and moving the items about.

This is all about taste, sight, touch and smell. They will also learn about putting things inside other things and size difference etc.

Baby Games Idea #4: Splash Time

This game is suitable once your baby can sit up unaided, or you can play it earlier with the assistance of a bath seat. Firstly you need to set up a splash pool. I have one of those half shell pools from bunnings. Make sure the water is the correct temperature for your baby. You don’t want it too cold not too hot. This Gould also be a great game for a warm day. Provide a selection of pouring containers and water toys. You may have some bath toys already, or you could use empty plastic containers and bottles. Teach your baby how to fill and empty the containers, how to splash and how to enjoy the water. Make sure the water stays warm so that your baby doesn’t end up miserable because the water has turned cold. If using a paddling pool, make sure your little one is adequately protected from the sun (preferably by being shaded).

Baby Games Idea #5: Feel This

This game is great for younger babies, and can be adapted for older babies who might like to hold the objects themselves. Babies love exploring new things, and this game focuses on their sense of touch. You’ll need a selection of different textures for them to feel. Feathers, silk scarves, sponge and bubble wrap are all suitable suggestions. For younger babies, gently drag the fabrics across her body and talk to her about what you’re doing. Explain that things feel soft or squishy, so she can start to understand the meaning of different words. For an older baby, explore the objects yourself and let your little one copy. We started this at gymbaroo and although my little guy is almost 2 he still loves exploring new feelings.

Huff post – great read – toddlers who try!

I just read this article and felt the need to share it.

Its such a great read and also throws in some helpful information on getting your toddler to try more or I believe help with independence.

There is no harm in helping your child and doing things for them however I’m a big believer teaching self independence and with teaching comes knowledge and hopefully self respect and good self esteem levels.

Have a read and tell me what you think.

noordinarymummy@gmail.com
Copyright © 2014 TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc. | “The Huffington Post” is a registered trademark of TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc. All rights reserved
THE BLOG
Why Some Kids Try Harder and Some Kids Give Up
Tracy Cutchlow 09/16/14 07:05 PM ET
My toddler struggled to buckle the straps on her high chair. “Almost,” she muttered as she tried again and again. “Almost,” I agreed, trying not to hover. When she got it, I exclaimed, “You did it! It was hard, but you kept trying, and you did it. I’m so proud of you.

The way I praised her effort took a little effort on my part. If I hadn’t known better, I might have just said, “Clever girl!” (Or even “Here, let me help you with that.”) What’s so bad about that? Read on.

Stanford researcher Carol Dweck has been studying motivation and perseverance since the 1960s. And she found that children fall into one of two categories:

Those with a fixed mindset, who believe their successes are a result of their innate talent or smarts
Those with a growth mindset, who believe their successes are a result of their hard work
Fixed mindset: ‘If you have to work hard, you don’t have ability.’

Kids with a fixed mindset believe that you are stuck with however much intelligence you’re born with. They would agree with this statement: “If you have to work hard, you don’t have ability. If you have ability, things come naturally to you.” When they fail, these kids feel trapped. They start thinking they must not be as talented or smart as everyone’s been telling them. They avoid challenges, fearful that they won’t look smart.

Growth mindset: ‘The more you challenge yourself, the smarter you become’

Kids with a growth mindset believe that intelligence can be cultivated: the more learning you do, the smarter you become. These kids understand that even geniuses must work hard. When they suffer a setback, they believe they can improve by putting in more time and effort. They value learning over looking smart. They persevere through difficult tasks.

What creates these beliefs in our kids? The type of praise we give them — even starting at age 1.

The research

In one study, Dweck gathered up fifth graders, randomly divided them in two groups, and had them work on problems from an IQ test. She then praised the first group for their intelligence:

“Wow, that’s a really good score. You must be smart at this.”

She praised the second group for their effort:

“Wow, that’s a really good score. You must have tried really hard.”

She continued to test the kids, including presenting them with a choice between a harder or easier task.

Kids praised for their effort tended to take the challenging task, knowing they could learn more. They were more likely to continue feeling motivated to learn and to retain their confidence as problems got harder.

Kids praised for their intelligence requested the easier task, knowing there was a higher chance of success. They lost their confidence as problems got harder, and they were much more likely to inflate their test scores when recounting them.

Later, Dweck and her colleagues took the study out of the lab and into the home. Every four months for two years, Stanford and University of Chicago researchers visited fifty-three families and recorded them for ninety minutes as they went about their usual routines. The children were 14 months old at the start of the study.

Researchers then calculated how often parents used each type of praise: praising effort; praising character traits; and “other praise” that has a neutral effect, like “Good!” and “Wow!”

They waited five years.

Then the researchers surveyed the children, now 7 to 8 years old, on their attitudes toward challenges and learning. Children with a growth mindset tended to be more interested in challenges. Which kids had a growth mindset? Those who had heard more process praise as toddlers.

Can you unfix a fixed mindset?

I got an email from an inner-city high school teacher. “Is it too late to learn algebra, or third-person singular conjugation, or rocket science if you didn’t [develop a growth mindset] when you were 4 years old?” she asked.

Dweck had the same question. So she took middle-schoolers and college students who had fixed mindsets. She found that the students were able to improve their grades when they were taught that the brain is like a muscle: intelligence is not fixed.

It’s not too late — not for your kids, and not for you. Salman Khan of Khan Academy is on a mission to let you know it. He created an inspiring video, based on Dweck’s work, titled “You Can Learn Anything”:
The message: The brain is like a muscle. The more you use it, the stronger it gets. The way you exercise your brain is by embracing challenges, practicing skills, learning new things. As Khan puts it, “the brain grows most by getting questions wrong, not right.”

Which is why, when my toddler was trying to snap her own buckle, I needed to encourage her to take on the challenge by saying, “Almost!” and “Try again” instead of “Here, let me do that for you.”

Pass it on

Sharing is caring, as they say. “If society as a whole begins to embrace the struggle of learning, there is no end to what that could mean for global human potential,” Khan writes.

So pass it on!

Through thick and through thin!

Through thick and through thin.

So the saying goes, you will stick by your partner through thick and through thin. Why is it that this saying doesn’t always ring true?

Marriage is supposed to made upon love, respect, trust and understanding. Why are something’s simply left misunderstood or unsaid?

One would assume that when standing face to face with your loved one, saying those special life combining vows, that your happily ever after will remain.

No one ever wants to hear the three little words ‘this isn’t working’ we all wish to hear ‘I love you’ or ‘we can work through this’.

Why is it so hard to always be on the same page?

Yes relationships are hard and they most always will certainly need work at some point. Weather you have been together 10 years or 10 days, no relationship is perfect and there will always be hardship right?

I think that having hardship and working together makes you stronger as a couple. For every battle there will be a make up and I think that every relationship needs some tough times, this shows the love and respect that you have for each other as a couple to get through the hard times.

No relationship is perfect 100% of the time and I personally believe that if your putting on a facade that your relationship is perfect, what are you really hiding?

Truth is and studies show that to have a 100% non fight and totally agreeable relationship one person will need to ‘bow down’ either hold their thoughts and options to themselves in order to keep the other person happy.

If this is in fact true, why are why changing our options for our partners and why shouldn’t we speak up and have our own thoughts and opinions? Why are we trying to please everyone? Are we scared of failure or scared to voice our opinion in fear of offending or hurting someone’s feelings?

Arguing can be seen as communicating and voicing or sharing issues. In a relationship where there is not even a heated conversation, it could be that one or both parties don’t feel safe enough to express themselves. They doubt whether they can be honest about their feelings and be heard, respected, and still loved.

A lack of argument can also signal a lack of commitment to each other or the relationship. If you just don’t care about the longevity of your relationship with someone, you might just keep your head down and ignore anything that comes up because, ultimately, it won’t matter in the end.

I know in my marriage vows I said ‘through good times and through bad’. Yes I occasionally don’t see eye to eye with my hubby and we do argue. I think this keeps our relationship real and I know he respects my opinions and likes that fact that if we don’t agree on a topic that I challenge him.

I’m not a shrinking person and I won’t agree in order to please or keep the peace.

We all have our own opinions and we are all very much entitled to have them. Any partner who scrutinises their significant other, for having opinion should have a look at themselves.
What are they hiding?
Are they controlling?
Do they feel insecure?
Is this why they don’t like you to speak up?
Or are they simply embarrassed or afraid that you may in fact challenge their thoughts?

If you’re arguing over small, petty day to day insignificant things just to get interaction, or to be validated, or in fact if your trying to push someone away out of fear or rejection it’s unhealthy for both you and your relationship. What you really need to do is take a good hard look at what you really want from the confrontations and find healthier ways to have your needs met.

Fact is that when blending your life with another person’s it isn’t always going to go smoothly. It takes work and there will be times when various differences come between you weather you think they are important or not.

The important thing is to learn to navigate these ‘arguments’ so that you can come out the other side feeling more secure, intimate and respected in the relationship.

No one gets taught how to argue with our significant other. There’s usually no standard instruction manual on how to deal with the possible arguments of day to day life that we might get into with someone whom we love, but knowing how to ‘argue’ well is one of the best tools for a long term relationship. It can close the divide between a love that is slowly disintegrating, and a love that is true, strong and more intimate with years gone by.

It’s very natural that you’re going to fight once in awhile. However, being frustrated or angry with your partner doesn’t have to be destructive and it doesn’t have to ‘end in tears’.

Working through issues teaches you about each other and by learning you can appreciate each other more and the love and respect can and will grow.

Talk to each other in a calm manner and never go to bed on an argument. All that will do is brew overnight and possibly neither person will sleep well. Therefore being overtired will only cause more destruction within the argument.

A great therapist once said;
“You can’t control anyone else’s behaviour. The only one in your charge is you.”

A great article on relationships and arguments is in the link below.

http://www.rachaellay.com/arguing-can-make-your-relationship-healthier/

First aid and your family.

First aid in your family.

It was recently bought to my attention by a reader of my blog just how important first aid is to know.

So I’ve decided to write about why first aid is really important and shy we should ‘at least’ know the basics.

Many accidents happen in and around the home so knowing the simple things could save a life.

Whether it’s a minor or major situation, first aid knowledge will give you the confidence to act quickly and smartly. This could be the difference between life and death.

First aid teaches you how to deal with every day cuts and scrapes and nosebleeds.

You will also learn advice on treating asthma, fractures, sunburn, poisons, low blood sugar and much more.

Heart and circulatory disease is one of our biggest killer’s during your first aid course you will learn how to recognise and treat heart attacks and shock.

Simply learning the basic DR ABC

ABC – airway, breathing and
CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation).

DRSABCD stands for:

D= Danger – always check the danger to you, any bystanders and then the injured or ill person. Make sure you do not put yourself in danger when going to the assistance of another person.

R = Response – is the person conscious? Do they respond when you talk to them, touch their hands or squeeze their shoulder?

Send for help – call triple zero (000). Don’t forget to answer the questions asked by the operator.

A= Airway – Is the person’s airway clear? Is the person breathing?

If the person is responding, they are conscious and their airway is clear, assess how you can help them with any injury.

If the person is not responding and they are unconscious, you need to check their airway by opening their mouth and having a look inside. If their mouth is clear, tilt their head gently back (by lifting their chin) and check for breathing. If the mouth is not clear, place the person on their side, open their mouth and clear the contents, then tilt the head back and check for breathing.

B = Breathing – check for breathing by looking for chest movements (up and down). Listen by putting your ear near to their mouth and nose. Feel for breathing by putting your hand on the lower part of their chest. If the person is unconscious but breathing, turn them onto their side, carefully ensuring that you keep their head, neck and spine in alignment. Monitor their breathing until you hand over to the ambulance officers.

C = CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation)
– if an adult is unconscious and not breathing, make sure they are flat on their back and then place the heel of one hand in the centre of their chest and your other hand on top. Press down firmly and smoothly (compressing to one third of their chest depth) 30 times. Give two breaths. To get the breath in, tilt their head back gently by lifting their chin.

Pinch their nostrils closed, place your open mouth firmly over their open mouth and blow firmly into their mouth. Keep going with the 30 compressions and two breaths at the speed of approximately five repeats in two minutes until you hand over to the ambulance officers or another trained person, or until the person you are resuscitating responds.

The method for CPR for children under eight and babies is very similar and you can learn these skills in a CPR course.

D = Defibrillator – for unconscious adults who are not breathing, apply an automated external defibrillator (AED) if one is available. They are available in many public places, clubs and organisations.

An AED is a machine that delivers an electrical shock to cancel any irregular heart beat (arrhythmia), in an effort get the normal heart beating to re-establish itself.

The devices are very simple to operate. Just follow the instructions and pictures on the machine, and on the package of the pads, as well as the voice prompts. If the person responds to defibrillation, turn them onto their side and tilt their head to maintain their airway. Some AEDs may not be suitable for children.

I’ve also included a few links on where you can do your first aid certificate (if your in Australia) otherwise google first aid within your suburb, town, state or country and I’m sure you will find a the relevant information.

Hopefully this will encourage everyone to learn first aid. It could save your loved ones life!
http://m.redcross.org.au/content/first-aid?m=1
http://www.firstaidtrainingsydneycbd.com.au/?gclid=CIrV-52mt78CFYQIvAodGK4ACw
http://www.cprfirstaid.com.au/hltaid003-provide-first-aid/?gclid=CPmjhaemt78CFRUDvAodrlAAuQ

 

http://stjohn.org.au

 

 

Teaching your child to read.

Teaching children to read – school ready!

Preparing your child for school begins at an early age, which is why it’s important to learn fun ways to teach your child to read. With the ever changing challenges your children will automatically face in school, you shouldn’t wait until kindergarten for your child to start and learn this essential skill.

Learning doesn’t have to be hard and let’s face it, it should be fun!

Here are done of my tips on getting started and helping your little ones to learn and expand their minds, knowledge and vocabulary.

1. FLASH CARDS

Back when I was at school – yes a while ago now, flash cards were the basics when it came to ways to learn to read. I remember playing snap and memory with my parents and siblings. Simple and easy to make your own bit most of all effective!

2. ROAD SIGNS

The road sign game is a lot of fun with your little ones. Granted, some names are difficult for little ones to pronounce in the beginning; however, it’s a fun and effective way for them to also learn colours on stop and give-way signs, also shapes of these signs, being hexagonal and triangle.

3. CHILDREN’S SHOWS

Children’s shows, such as Thomas the Tank Engine, Play School, Sesame Street, Dora the Explorer, and many more, offer some reading and word recognition skills. You can decide on your own which is the best option for your child, as some children’s TV shows are purely for entertainment purposes only.

4. COMPUTER-BASED LEARNING

Products like LeapFrog and Jumpstart offer computer-based learning, including reading skills. You can also download inexpensive and sometimes free apps for your iPad to help expand these skills. With so many options if you choose the right ones you can help your little one learn numbers, abc and much more!

5. MENUS

When dining out, you can use the menus to help your little one learn new words. In some restaurants you can also work on their foreign language skills and of course the cost of the meal. You can also get them interested in a healthy diet. Menus today, especially in fast-food restaurants, are required to show the calories for each option. This can help with not only learning and pronunciation of words but also numbers.
6. COMIC BOOKS

For children who love super-heroes, you can use comic books to help them learn to read. They are colorful, entertaining, and interest them as it highlights and showcases their favourite characters like Batman, Spider-Man, and more.
7. READ WITH THEM

Reading at least one story to your children before bedtime is a great way to encourage them to read. Books allow you to escape into a new world for both you and your child. Books inspire the imagination, also try having them read to you. They may miss words but it will excite them to turn pages and make up their own shorties. This will help your children wanting to learn more, just so they can discover what the happens next in the books.

Entertaining little ones.

Keeping your little one entertained.

Let’s be honest here, we sometimes wonder ‘what next?’ What can we do now? How can I occupy my little one?

Well I have also often have these thoughts, so here are a few of my favorite things to do with my little man.

1. Outdoor exploring – my little one loves the outdoors so we often go exploring in the gardens. Showing him flowers and various plants, insects, trees etc not only keeps him busy but also teaches him about his environment. Get involved and smell flowers, walk on grass, sit and play with dirt, lay on the ground and make picture out if the clouds in the sky!

2. Drawing with chalk – again outdoors. Get some giant chalk sticks and let your children’s explore on the drive way or pavement. Chalk is not permeant so easily washed away with a bucket of water or with the hose. Unleash your creative side and your little ones also! Draw animals, write words, create shapes – anything is possible – explain as you go and your little will will absorb all your knowledge, remember they are sponges!

3. Singing and dancing – every night when little man is in the bath we sing songs. This is a little special time for us and it keeps him in the bath a little longer than 2 seconds. Which is his usual. So if your little one is too busy to bath – get singing. Lots of nursery rhymes have hand actions and clapping and stomping are great for motor skills communicating. Our favorite is ‘eyes,ears,mouth and nose’ – ‘gloop gloop went the little green frog’ and ‘Open shut them.’ These are super easy and fun. Keeps both occupied and promotes language skills. Of course you don’t need to do this in the bath you can do this in the lounge room or anywhere.

4. Cooking – I know this sounds dangerous but I never give him sharp objects or anything that he can be harmed with. When I am preparing any meal I pop my toddler in his high chair and let him watch me. I give him a bowl, spoon, whisk and other plastic non shape utensils and allow him to imitate. This really helps with their development and learning abilities.

5. Sensory games – cheap and cheerful. Get some small containers from your Tupperware cupboard. Go to your pantry and pull out some rice and pasta, then head to your driveway and collect some pebbles approx 20mm in diameter then a small jug of water. Put the rice in one container, pasta in another, pebbles in another and finally the water in another. Allow your little one to sit and play with these. Not only is this another form of exploring but it’s teaching them different texture, shape, size and materials.

6. Reading books – my little guy loves to read! So every day we sit down and read at least 2 books. Not only is this quiet time, it also helps him to learn words, objects, images, colors and turning pages. He also sits by himself and turns the pages in his books chatting away to himself.

7. Chases – this can be indoors or out. Play catchies! You chase them then allow them to chase you. Also allow them to catch you and when you catch them. Make it special – give a little tickle or kiss. Guaranteed this will be fun for all involved!

If these don’t keep you and your toddler busy I’m not sure what will. 🙂

Remember they are only little for a short time so embrace their ability to learn and allow them to crate and learn to their full potential.