Tag Archives: Energy

Tough days.

I will be honest, today was tough…

I cried on numerous occasions out of frustration and the feeling of defeat.

My very robust and super active 4 year old has been waking about 5am every morning for the past 2 weeks. I am tired.

Throughout the day he is busy, although he can play solo, he has been craving my attention and begging me to play with him. It’s not quiet play though. He wants to play superheroes or Jiu Jitsu. Both of which involve wrestling or jumping around ‘chasing bad guys’. It’s exhausting.

I try to tell myself that he is only 4 and I should relish in his want to play with me, as soon he may not want to, but – and I know there should not be a but, but there is. I’m tired.

I stay up late waiting for my husband to get home which is generally about 9:30pm. He works late most nights. By the time we chat, reconnect and have some time together, it’s about 11pm. Only to be woken at 5am if not earlier.

Running on empty and then having busy days it can get the better of me, and today it did.

I’m usually quite strong and can handle a lot. I take it in my stride, but I’m also human.

Today my little guy pushed all kinds of boundaries. As did my 18mo. They fed of each other’s energy and both were full on.

Whilst we were out at Jiu Jitsu this afternoon my little guy was just being silly and another mother passed a comment, a negative comment that hurt my feelings. I chose to ignore it but eventually it got to me and my eyes welled up. Yep in public, I was so embarrassed I tried to hold it together but the tears streamed down my face.

I had to go outside and get ‘fresh air’. It was hard.

I know he is still only 4. I also know he is pushing boundaries and I need to set some really firm ones.

Today I just wanted to ‘give in’. I had a burn inside me where I wanted to pack both my kids back into the car and drive home. Drive to my safe place where there is no one to judge me. No one to tell me how to reprimand my child. No one to snarl at me. No one to pass negative comments at me. No judging eyes. No looking down your nose at me and No looks of disgust.

I then got this post hit my mail box.

It clicked.

I needed it.

I know I shouldn’t feel embarrassed or threatened by my children’s behaviour, but today I did.

Tomorrow is a new day.

Stop Feeling Threatened By Your Child’s Behavior

New year – new you?

New year, new you? Ummm maybe but shouldn’t we be more focused on continuity?

I know that most New Years resolutions are to ‘loose weight’ ‘get fit’ ‘tone up’ etc. however I prefer to try and not follow ‘dad’ diets but continue to eat and live healthy throughout the year.

Yes I know it’s easier said than done, but rest assured if you don’t give yourself a time limit or try to convince yourself it’s a ‘new resolution’ you will generally be able to stick to it.

Now I had my second baby 7 months ago and have recently started to ‘work out’ again. Not because I’m trying to loose baby weight as such. I’m not as I’m fortunate enough that my baby weight was easily shifted. With what I believe helped was breast feeding and generally eating healthy throughout my pregnancy.

I did however still gain 17kg but I managed to loose it all within the first 3 months. My body shape had however changed. I’m more curvy now and my hips are defiantly wider. I’m back to my pre pregnancy weight and in most of my pre pregnancy clothing but I will admit they do fit differently and my jeans are tighter in the hips and bottom and yup – I have muffin top! But I haven’t been too stressed about it. I’m more concerned with keeping my milk supply for my baby girl and also being healthy for my own well being.

So having recently joined the gym to gain some fitness back I’m doing low impact exercises. Things such as body balance class, Pilates on a mat and yoga. I’ve also started with a personal trainer once per week focusing on more core and inner strength training.

Since exercising again I find that I have more energy and feel better as a mother, wife and person.

I used to train a lot, right up until I fell pregnant with my little man who recently turned 3. I trained every day – 7 days per week for about 2 hours per day mainly weight with about 30 minutes cardio and 15 minutes stretching.

It was hard for me to fall pregnant and I had complications with both my pregnancies so with my first my obstetrician suggested I do light exercise only which I basically quit the gym and only did light walking. I found that if I went too quickly I would get cramping and a ‘stitch’ like feeling in my tummy and groin area so I didn’t want to push my body.

Every one is different though and most can continue to exercise without any issues however listen to your body and also seek medical advice if your concerned.

Whilst on holiday I came across this article with some very good exercises which can be done anywhere any time.

I’m big on using your own body weight as your resistance and I’m also a big believer in listening to your body and only doing what your comfortable with.

Check out this link. Great exercises. Easy to do. You can do them anywhere, and perhaps like me, after the little ones go to bed and you have a spare 30-45 minutes to yourself.

I know it may not seem appealing to exercise at the end of the day as your possibly tired from looking after your little ones, or perhaps just a long day at work. BUT trust me when I say the endorphins will kick in and after a few days of exercising. Your body will feel great and your energy levels will be higher.

Go on, give it a go!

Good luck!

http://www.self.com/fitness/workouts/2016/01/bodyweight-moves-get-in-shape/?mbid=social_facebook_selffitness

Summer tips!

So with summer just around the corner, a lot of friends are starting to work towards their summer body.

Or if your like me, your trying to shift those last couple of baby kilos.

I know I’ve posted some foods calorie counts previously to help with weight loss goals.

Below I’ve listed a few easy ‘switches’ that can help you achieve these goals sooner!

Always remember to achieve your weight loss goals, eat healthy and your still allowed ‘cheat meals’ or snacks on occasion. With all weight loss, it is recommended that some exercise is included. Be it a walk or a class of some sort or simply running around with your children.

You can loose weight with a strict diet and without exercise however exercise will speed up the process and you will get results sooner!

Not to mention feel better as exercise releases endorphins and will give you more energy and a heather mind.

🙂

Switch a full cream milk in your flat white (123 calories) to skim milk flat white (68 calories)

Switch 100g of roast duck (313 calories) for 100g of roast chicken (152 calories)

Switch a can of lemonade (124 calories) for a diet lemonade (2 calories) – or even better sparkling water (0 calories)

Switch a pita bread pocket (190 calories) for a slice of Mountain Bread (75 calories)

Switch a glass of tonic water (135 calories) for a glass of soda water (0 calories)

Switch a 100ml scoop of Connoisseur
Vanilla ice cream (224 calories) for the same size scoop of Peter’s Light and Creamy Vanilla (75 calories)

Switch a tablespoon of regular cottage cheese (45 calories) for a tablespoon of low fat cottage cheese (26 calories)

Switch 80g of mashed potato (85 calories) for 80g of mashed cauliflower (19 calories)

Switch a tablespoon of sour cream (70 calories) for a tablespoon of fat free Greek yoghurt (13 calories)

Switch a cup of regular soy milk (185 calories) for a cup of light soy milk (95 calories)

Another tip – always read the labels of food as sometimes when something is low or no fat, it has a higher sugar count.

And what happens if we don’t burn the sugar ??? It turns to fat!

Ovarian cysts!

Ovarian cysts

My husband and I have been trying for a new baby. Very exciting news. I’ve always wanted 2 children and having a gorgeous little boy who is my world and whom I totally adore has been the best gift ever to me.

As most know, I had various issues with falling pregnant with my little guy and since trying for another I’m experiencing similar issues.

A few weeks ago I went in clomid to assist with ovulating. No luck 🙁 I went to have a blood test to just make sure things are ok.

Unfortunately they are not. I have high levels of testosterone and am not ovulating. I was then sent for an ultrasound. This came back with more horrible news. I have am ovarian cyst the size of an egg on my right ovary. Along with the continual blows, I inly have 14 follicles on my left Fallopian tube and 7 on my right. Most women have hundreds.

So here we go again with fertility issues.

Since finding out all this information I’ve been doing research on both ovarian cysts and follicles. Below is what I’ve found.
Ovarian Cysts and Tumors

The ovaries are two small organs located on either side of the uterus in a woman’s body. They make hormones, including estrogen, which trigger menstruation. Every month, the ovaries release a tiny egg. The egg makes its way down the fallopian tube to potentially be fertilized. This cycle of egg release is called ovulation.

What causes ovarian cysts?
Cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can form in the ovaries. They are very common. They are particularly common during the childbearing years.

There are several different types of ovarian cysts. The most common is a functional cyst. It forms during ovulation. That formation happens when either the egg is not released or the sac — follicle — in which the egg forms does not dissolve after the egg is released.

Nearly 60 Percent of Uterine Cancer Cases Preventable: Report
Other types of cysts include:

Polycystic ovaries. In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the follicles in which the eggs normally mature fail to open and cysts form.

Endometriomas. In women with endometriosis, tissue from the lining of the uterus grows in other areas of the body. This includes the ovaries. It can be very painful and can affect fertility.
Cystadenomas. These cysts form out of cells on the surface of the ovary. They are often fluid-filled.

Dermoid cysts. This type of cyst contains tissue similar to that in other parts of the body. That includes skin, hair, and teeth.

What causes ovarian tumors?
Tumors can form in the ovaries, just as they form in other parts of the body. If tumors are non-cancerous, they are said to be benign. If they are cancerous, they are called malignant. The three types of ovarian tumors are:

Epithelial cell tumors start from the cells on the surface of the ovaries. These are the most common type of ovarian tumors.

Germ cell tumors start in the cells that produce the eggs. They can either be benign or cancerous. Most are benign.
Stromal tumors originate in the cells that produce female hormones.
Doctors aren’t sure what causes ovarian cancer. They have identified, though, several risk factors, including:

Age — specifically women who have gone through menopause
Smoking
Obesity
Not having children or not breastfeeding (however, using birth control pills seems to lower the risk)
Taking fertility drugs (such as Clomid)
Hormone replacement therapy
Family or personal history of ovarian, breast, or colorectal cancer (having the BRCA gene can increase the risk)

What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts and tumors?

Often, ovarian cysts don’t cause any symptoms. You may not realize you have one until you visit your health care provider for a routine pelvic exam. Ovarian cysts can, however, cause problems if they twist, bleed, or rupture.

If you have any of the symptoms below, it’s important to have them checked out. That’s because they can also be symptoms of ovarian tumors. Ovarian cancer often spreads before it is detected.

Symptoms of ovarian cysts and tumors include:

Pain or bloating in the abdomen
Difficulty urinating, or frequent need to urinate
Dull ache in the lower back
Pain during sexual intercourse
Painful menstruation and abnormal bleeding
Weight gain
Nausea or vomiting
Loss of appetite, feeling full quickly
How do doctors diagnose ovarian cysts and tumors?

The obstetrician/gynecologist or your regular doctor may feel a lump while doing a routine pelvic exam. Most ovarian growths are benign. But a small number can be cancerous. That’s why it’s important to have any growths checked. Postmenopausal women in particular should get examined. That’s because they face a higher risk of ovarian cancer.

How do doctors diagnose ovarian cysts and tumors? continued…
Tests that look for ovarian cysts or tumors include:

Ultrasound. This test uses sound waves to create an image of the ovaries. The image helps the doctor determine the size and location of the cyst or tumor.

Other imaging tests. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) are highly detailed imaging scans. The doctor can use them to find ovarian tumors and see whether and how far they have spread.

Hormone levels. The doctor may take a blood test to check levels of several hormones. These include luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol, and testosterone.

Laparoscopy. This is a surgical procedure used to treat ovarian cysts. It uses a thin, light-tipped device inserted into your abdomen. During this surgery, the surgeon can find cysts or tumors and may remove a small piece of tissue (biopsy) to test for cancer.
CA-125. If the doctor thinks the growth may be cancerous, he might take a blood test to look for a protein called CA-125. Levels of this protein tend to be higher in some — but not all — women with ovarian cancer. This test is mainly used in women over age 35, who are at slightly higher risk for ovarian cancer.

If the diagnosis is ovarian cancer, the doctor will use the diagnostic test results to determine whether the cancer has spread outside of the ovaries. If it has, the doctor will also use the results to determine how far it has spread. This diagnostic procedure is called staging. This helps the doctor plan your treatment.

How are ovarian cysts and tumors treated?

Most ovarian cysts will go away on their own. If you don’t have any bothersome symptoms, especially if you haven’t yet gone through menopause, your doctor may advocate ”watchful waiting.” The doctor won’t treat you. But the doctor will check you every one to three months to see if there has been any change in the cyst.

Birth control pills may relieve the pain from ovarian cysts. They prevent ovulation, which reduces the odds that new cysts will form.

Surgery is an option if the cyst doesn’t go away, grows, or causes you pain. There are two types of surgery:

Laparoscopy uses a very small incision and a tiny, lighted telescope-like instrument. The instrument is inserted into the abdomen to remove the cyst. This technique works for smaller cysts.

Laparotomy involves a bigger incision in the stomach. Doctors prefer this technique for larger cysts and ovarian tumors. If the growth is cancerous, the surgeon will remove as much of the tumor as possible. This is called debulking. Depending on how far the cancer has spread, the surgeon may also remove the ovaries, uterus, fallopian tubes, omentum — fatty tissue covering the intestines — and nearby lymph nodes.

Other treatments for cancerous ovarian tumors include:

Chemotherapy — drugs given through a vein (IV), by mouth, or directly into the abdomen to kill cancer cells. Because they kill normal cells as well as cancerous ones, chemotherapy medications can have side effects, including nausea and vomiting, hair loss, kidney damage, and increased risk of infection. These side effects should go away after the treatment is done.

Radiation — high-energy X-rays that kill or shrink cancer cells. Radiation is either delivered from outside the body, or placed inside the body near the site of the tumor. This treatment also can cause side effects, including red skin, nausea, diarrhea, and fatigue. Radiation is not often used for ovarian cancer.

Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation may be given individually or together. It is possible for cancerous ovarian tumors to return. If that happens, you will need to have more surgery, sometimes combined with chemotherapy or radiation.

The ovaries contain eggs (which formed in the ovary during childhood) and these are matured by the ovary (usually one at a time) in follicles which then come to the surface of the ovary and burst to release the egg into the top of the fallopian tube.

Thus if multiple follicles have been detected in an ovary, that ovary is developing more than one egg at a time – this can result non identical twins.

Usually only one follicle is developed to maturity at a time but it is possible to stimulate the ovary to produce more (using hormones) as part of interventions relating to infertility treatments.

Antral follicles are small follicles (about 2-8 mm in diameter) that we can see – and measure and count – with ultrasound. Antral follicles are also referred to as resting follicles. Vaginal ultrasound is the best way to accurately assess and count these small structures.

Many fertility specialists believe that the antral follicle counts (in conjunction with female age) are the best tool that we currently have for estimating a woman’s remaining fertility potential (or ovarian reserve). Ovarian volume measurements (also done by ultrasound), and day 3 FSH and AMH levels (blood tests) are additional studies that can help.

Presumably, the number of antral follicles visible on ultrasound is indicative of the relative number of microscopic (and sound asleep) primordial follicles remaining in the ovary. Each primordial follicle contains an immature egg that can potentially develop in the future.

In other words, when there are only a few antral follicles visible, there are far less eggs remaining as compared to when there are many more antral follicles visible. As women age, they have less eggs (primordial follicles) remaining – and they have less antral follicles visible on ultrasound. Therefor lower chances of falling pregnant.

 

Breakfast!

Breakfast.

For as long as I can remember breakfast has been promoted as the most important meal of the day. I also am a big believer in this.

Breakfast is the first meal that you eat after sleeping for most of us 7 hours. Yes some lucky people get more sleep, some get less however the average person gets 7 hours. Anyway, it’s seen as the most important meal as it kick starts your day. Fuels you for what’s ahead and can also play a major part in the energy levels and amount of food that you may consume for the rest if your day.

I know many people that have a ‘liquid’ breakfast. For the most part I agree that this can be a great start to your day, providing it’s nutritious and wholesome. A think a smoothie packed full of fruit, yoghurt and or some type of fibre and protein is great however what I don’t agree with is those package sugar filled products.

We all know that by starting our day with sugar only kick starts the sugar craving for the day. Your taste buds enjoy the sugar therefor have you wanting more. They are not filling and lack protein and fibre therefore you will be hungry not too long after you have eaten and this can also cause you to reach for the ‘not so healthy’ snack.

By eating a good breakfast you are recharging the brain and body, you’ll be more efficient in just about everything you do.

Some people skip breakfast in an effort to lose weight, but that’s not a good idea — it can backfire.

Skipping meals, especially breakfast, can actually make weight control more difficult. Breakfast skippers tend to consume more food than usual at their next meal, or go for high-calorie and or high sugar snacks to stave off hunger.

Several studies suggest that people tend to add more body fat when they eat fewer, larger meals than when they eat the same number of calories in smaller, more frequent meals. It’s been proven that by eating small meals on a regular basis you keep your metabolism consistent and therefore your GI (glycemic index) low and you will find you feel more satisfied for a longer period of time.

While adults need to eat breakfast each day to function and perform, kids need it even more. Their growing bodies and developing brains need regular refuelling from food. When kids skip breakfast, they get distracted easily as they are hungry and skipping meals can also have adverse affects.

According to Australian Food News, in 2012 alone, Sanitarium sold over 34 million litres through supermarkets. Up&Go to me it’s clearly a marketing success and appeals to those that are either time poor, lack the knowledge to eat better, can’t be bother to eat better or are happy to just have convenience?

I know many people who simply reach for Up&Go as it is convenient and easy for them.

I personally would never consume it nor allow my child to have it. I’d rather get out of bed 15 minutes earlier to prepare something more wholesome and delicious for him. Especially after doing readers h in it. I’m shocked that’s it’s allowed to be marketed as a “nutritious start” for busy people when they need to “get up and go”.

With Up&Go claiming that it has the protein, energy and fibre of 3 Weet-Bix and milk, it has somehow slipped into the breakfast landscape without much comment or opposition. Yet many taste-test reveals, it is a highly processed product that actually contains NO Weet-Bix which will come as a shock to many.

Up&Go have been given a Nutrition value of 13 out of 20 from food watch which is a website that provides information in various foods. It is written by Catherine Saxelby who is an accredited nutritionist and dietitian and is qualified to answer questions on food, diets, fads/trends and weight problems as they relate to health and wellbeing.

She is an accomplished author, freelance writer and speaker who helps busy people eat well at home and on the go. She can ‘translate’ complex scientific detail into interesting and easy-to-understand language.

Up&Go Ingredients (Chocolate flavour)
Filtered water, skim milk powder, cane sugar (4%), wheat maltodextrin, soy protein, vegetable oils (1.5%) (sunflower, canola), Hi-maize™ starch, corn syrup solids, inulin, fructose, cocoa (0.5%), cereals (oat flour, barley beta glucan), minerals (calcium, phosphorus), food acid (332), flavour, vegetable gums (460,466,407) vitamins (C, A, niacin, B12, B2, B6, B1, folate), salt.

332 = Potassium Citrate – related to citric acid, a natural food acid in lemons and citrus
460 = Cellulose microcrystalline – this is a fibre – don’t know why it’s listed here as a gum
466 = Sodium carboxymethylcellulose – ditto
407 = Carrageenan – a seaweed extract that thickens

Maltodextrin
Maltodextrin is an oligosaccharide (glucose polymers) which is absorbed very rapidly into the body. It is produced from wheat starch by partial hydrolysis and looks like a white spray-dried powder. It is used as a thickener or texture modifying agent in foods such as flavoured milk drinks (like Up&Go), pasta sauces, puddings and cake mixes.

In terms of glycemic index, maltodextrin can be considered to be metabolically equivalent to pure glucose (dextrose). In other words it has a very high GI and but has little or no sweetness. It equates to 3 per cent which also has me wonder why Up&Go has to have three vegetable gums as well as this thickener?

Sugars
Up&Go has THREE different sweeteners – cane sugar, corn syrup solids (think high-fructose corn syrup) as well as fructose. Why on earth would a flavoured milk drink need all these three? Surely just sugar would be enough to sweeten? We all know sugar is not great for our health especially our teeth.

Nutrition Information

Per Serve (350ml) Per 100ml
Kilojoules 1150 329
Calories 277 79
Protein,g 11.6 3.3
Total fat,g 5.3 1.5
Saturated fat, g 0.7 0.2
Carbohydrate, g 42.4 12.1
Sugars, g 26.6 7.6
Dietary fibre, g 5.3 1.5
Sodium, mg 228 65

Looking over the ingredient list, it’s easily seen there are actually NO Weet-bix present.

There is 11.6g protein, 1150kJ and 5.3g fibre which is more than in 3 Weet-bix with 125ml whole milk if you go by the pack.

Water is the first ingredient followed by skim milk powder so the drink is mixed up from dry ingredients – it’s not made from whole fresh milk.

Up&Go is highly fortified with 8 vitamins (C, A, niacin, B12, B2, B6, B1, folate) and two minerals (calcium and phosphorous).

Some of the vitamins in a Up&Go are in substantial quantities eg

Vitamin A: supplies 24% of your RDI
Vitamin B12: 50% of your RDI – B12 is often short in the diet of vegans
Calcium: 400mg which is 40% of your RDI

Where does that protein come from?
Protein is derived from skim milk powder followed by soy protein and a small bit of oat flour? This is not ideal protein and I can think of many other easy and convenient foods that is rather reach for, for my protien intake.

Where does the fibre come from?
Not from whole wheat as in Weet-Bix but a mix of Hi-Maize starch (Hi-Maize starch is a special commercial strain of maize or corn that high in resistant starch), inulin (a commercial fibre derived from chicory) and beta-glucan from barley (a soluble fibre that’s also found in oats and can help sweep cholesterol out of the body).

These are vastly different forms of fibre than in Weet-Bix. These are all highly processed forms of what is to be claiming to be nutritious and good for you.

They are attractive to manufacturers as they are soluble in liquids so stay nicely mixed in a drink such as this.

In contrast wheat bran or oat bran tends to settle at the bottom of any drink and would form a thick sludge in a drink like this. Ever blended up an oat bran smoothie? You’ll soon see the bran settle to the bottom! It’s just its nature.

If you simply struggle to eat or can’t make time for a proper breakfast, perhaps look at a better option of Oats Express.

Oats express is made from milk and positions itself away from soy milk. It has a much simpler list of 9 ingredients which are:
Low fat milk, milk solids, sugar, oat fibre (min 1.25%), tapioca maltodextrin, cocoa powder (min 0.7%), malt extract, natural flavour, vegetable gums (460,466,407).

Read more: http://foodwatch.com.au/reviews/item/product-review-upgo-liquid-breakfast.html#ixzz3CFFBX07F
Read more: http://foodwatch.com.au/reviews/item/product-review-upgo-liquid-breakfast.html#ixzz3CFDN7HSm

Keeping your energy levels up!

Everyone is familiar with all-out feeling or that exhausted day (or night) when no matter how enticing something can be, we just can’t psych ourselves up to go.

What can be harder to recognize is a low-grade energy drain. In this case, you may not necessarily feel the classic signs of exhaustion. Much like achy muscles or that all-over tired feeling. What you do experience is an increasing lack of get-up-and-go for many of the activities you used to love.

You may also find it harder to concentrate on normal every day tasks, and, eventually, you can also find your patience grows short and your level of frustration rises, even when confronted with seemingly simple every day things.

Top 10 Energy Boosters
1. Increase Your Magnesium Intake

Eating a balanced diet can help ensure your vitamin and mineral needs are met. But if you still find yourself too to tired you could have a slight magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium is a mineral that is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in your body, including breaking down glucose into energy, So when levels are even a little low, energy can drop.

It’s known that women with magnesium deficiencies have higher heart rates and required more oxygen to do physical tasks than they did after their magnesium levels were restored. That means their bodies were working harder which, over time, can leave you feeling even more tired and depleted.

The recommended daily intake of magnesium is around 300 milligrams for women and 350 milligrams for men. To make sure you’re getting enough try Adding a handful of almonds, hazelnuts or cashews to your daily diet. This will also Increase your intake of whole grains, particularly bran cereal. Eat more fish, especially halibut.

2. Walk Around the Block

While it may seem as if moving about when you feel exhausted is the quickest route to feeling more exhausted, the opposite is true. Experts say that increasing physical activity, particularly walking, increases energy, you will also be surprised what fresh air will do for your brain function.

I personally like walking because it’s free, easily accessible, easy to do, doesn’t need training or equipment and you can do it anywhere.

By taking a brisk 10-minute walk it will not only increase your energy, but the effects lasted up to two hours. And when the daily 10-minute walks continued for three weeks, overall energy levels and mood were lifted.

3. Take a Power Nap

Research has shown that both information overload and pushing our brains too hard can zap energy. But studies by the National Institutes of Mental Health found that a 60-minute “power nap” can not only reverse the mind-numbing effects of information overload, it may also help us to better retain what we have learned.

4. Don’t Skip Breakfast or Any Other Meal actually.

People who eat breakfast are almost always certain to being in a better mood, and have more energy throughout the day. By breaking the fast soon after rising supplies your body with a jolt of fuel that sets the tone for the whole day. Also by eating breakfast you are also kick starting your metabolism. This will also help you to burn fats throughout the rest of the day.

5. Reduce your Stress and Deal With Anger levels.

Stress is the result of anxiety, and anxiety uses up a whole lot of our energy and causes negativity within our lives that is also draining of our energy levels.
6. Drink More Water and Less Alcohol

You may already know that it’s easy to confuse signals of hunger with thirst we think we need food when we really need water. But did you know that thirst can also masquerade as fatigue. A quick glass of water not only satisfy’s hunger but will help keep your brain alert longer.

7. Eat More Whole Grains and Less Sugar

The key here is keeping blood sugar balanced so energy is constant.

We all know that When you’re eating a sweet food, you get a quick spike in blood sugar, which gives you an initial burst of energy or rush. However that’s also followed by a just as fast drop in blood sugar, which in turn can leave you feeling even more tired that in the beginning.

8. Have a Snack

snacking is more than just eating between meals. Have something healthy that combines protein, a little fat and some fiber, like peanut butter on a whole-wheat cracker, or some yogurt with a handful of nuts.

The carbohydrate offer a quick pick-me-up, the protein keeps your energy up, and the fat makes the energy last.

9. Make It a Latte

Pair a quick caffeine hit with the sustaining power of protein by having a low-fat latte instead of just a cup of coffee.

The milk turns your java into a protein drink, which provides not only extra energy, but extra calcium, which is good for your bones. Combine it with a handful of almonds, the healthy fat should also satisfy your hunger.

10. Check Your Thyroid Function and Complete Blood Cell Count

It certainly won’t provide an instant boost. But if you’re constantly low on energy especially if you feel sluggish and still tired even after a good night’s rest.

You can also to your doctor about a blood test for thyroid dysfunction as well as anemia if you are concerned.

Thyroid can be a particular problem for women it often develops after childbirth and frequently during the perimenopause but a simple blood test can verify if this is your problem. If you’re diagnosed with low thyroid function, medication can bring your body back up to speed.

In anemia a reduction in red blood cells can mean your body isn’t getting the level of oxygen necessary to sustain energy. So, you tire more easily.

This can sometimes occur during a woman’s reproductive years, particularly if she has a very heavy menstrual cycle.

Again with any health issues. Always consult your doctor first.