Tag Archives: Children

6 STYLING TIPS:

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As a qualified interior designer myself, I’m often looking at other designers work. I find inspiration and ideas that I may not have seen or thought of myself.

Design is constantly changing and evolving.

One thing I always tell clients is that your space reflects your personality and the way you live. Your space should be comfortable and suit your needs.

Sometimes we all get a bit lost in wanting our homes to look like something from a magazine shoot, however what we need to consider is the variables that are in our lives. Do we have children that we need to cater for? I mean, my kids are allowed to lay on the lounge, no shoes of course, they often throw the pillows at each other and I don’t mind.

I want them to be comfortable in their own home and enjoy being children. I don’t want the picture perfect home where they can’t touch anything. After all, I believe childhood is about experience, exploration, learning and growing.

I also want my visitors to feel welcome and comfortable, there is nothing g worse than going somewhere and panicking that your children will break or put something out of place in another’s home. I don’t want my visitors to feel that.

A home to me, should emit happy and welcoming feelings.

The below article is a great write up on how we can design our homes in simple and effective yet liveable spaces. I’ve also added the images for sone Wednesday inspiration. 💕🏠

Bungalow5

6 STYLING TIPS: GET YOUR HOME TO LOOK LIKE THE HOME OF AN INTERIOR BLOGGER

Posted on June 22, 2017

You like when I do lists and you also like it when I show gorgeous stylish homes, so today I am going to combine the two. So if you are looking to give your home a quick makeover – and make it look just like the interior blogger’s home, then just follow these easy tips for great impact.

Group Your Picture Frames
You do not always need to hang your pictures for optimal exposure. Group on the floor or on a sideboard, and do as Norwegian blogger Katerina from Only Deco Love, add a few empty frames for a more delicate arrangement. Do not overdo it though, add just one or two, as it quickly can look over styled.

Simple Book & Art Display
Displaying books and favorite pics can be tricky, often the books just collects dust in the bookshelf, while some might end in a pile on the coffee table. With simple ledges from Ikea, which can be painted in any color to match the wall color, you can easily make any corner into a gallery, which would make any gallery owner envious. Norwegian blogger Nina from Stylizimo is the one to copy.

Keep It Simple
Danish blogger Caroline from September Edit do simple like no other. Simple doesn’t need to be dool and boring, far from it. Choose a few colors that you like and stick with them. Do not deviate for any means, unless you change the entire color palatte of course.

Style That Couch
A super easy and cheap way to update your living room is to change the pillows on you couch with the season. Choose different sizes and freshen up the style with different prints and textures. And by all means, do not just fold the throw over the side of the couch … NO! Learn from The Design Chaser Michelle and make it look like you just threw it there recklessly.

Show Them Your Chairs
Stools and chairs are the new status symbols, rather you spend some serious cash on them or not, there is no reason to hide them under the table. Showing them all the way in tends to look to neat. Pull them out like Norwegian blogger Elisabeth Heier just a few inches to underline their beauty.

Style The Bookshelves
Make it into a habit of rearranging your bookshelves at least once a month. You don’t have to go all in taking everything out and then replace everything. Simply remove all your accessories and find a new spot for them. Take note from Kasia from My Full House, she knows how to style a set of shelves like a pro.

Happy Anniversary

3 years.

Yes, it’s been 3 years since I started this blog. Gosh how quickly time flys!

I started it as something for ‘me’ somewhere I can ‘vent’, share experiences and thoughts, it has changed my life and brought me much satisfaction. It has changed me and the way I live my life. Interesting how when you put pen to paper, thoughts and feelings stream along with the after thought of, hey should I post this? Is this too honest? Am I being too open?

Writing a blog requires your time, devotion, commitment, and discipline. Blogging is considered similar to that of a personal journal. It has helped me to be observant of my life, who I allow close to me and gives purpose to my personal growth. It has trained my mind to track life and articulate the changes I’ve been experiencing.

When writing a personal blog, your blog becomes a digital record of your life that is saved “in the cloud.” As a result, it can never be lost, stolen, or destroyed in a fire. Almost consider it a ‘time capsule’.

When I started this blog I had many new things and changes in my life. I’d not long had my first child, I’d recently left my job and we moved our family into the suburbs where I knew no one. It was a huge life change, and so far for the better. Hard at first as I’d left all my ‘familiar’. I had no friends where we moved too, I was putting my little man into a preschool where I knew no one, it was s while new chapter. At first I felt lost and lonely but then I was connecting with other bloggers and readers of my blog. I know some may feel this is a ‘fake’ or ‘questionable’ communication, but it was communicating and to me, it helped me to feel connected with the outside world, in what was unfamiliar territory.

My blog is allowing me to communicate with others, maybe not face to face, but I now have over 6000 followers across my webpage, Facebook and twitter accounts. An achievement that I’m proud of as I don’t self promote nor do I pay for any advertising, oh and I don’t have advertisements on my blog.

To me my blog is about recording thoughts and feelings on paper and opening up and sharing my experience with others, allowing readers to either agree or disagree with me and my writing. Everyone has their own opinion and you may find blogging requires a filter. It’s simply not possible to write about every event, every thought, and every happening in your life. It’s ok to be open and personal, I just think for me especially, I like to hold a little back. Keep some things private.

I’ve found since starting writing my blog about my life and the thoughts that shape it, I’m more inclined to think more intentionally about who I am, who I am becoming, and whether you like what you see or not. Only you can change your thought process and only you can change the way that you live.

Whether it be through comments, e-mails, or social media, you may be surprised at how quickly you meet people on-line. And by meet people, I mean legitimately form relationships that seek to serve one another, a common ground and shared experiences. I’ve found that the blogging community is friendly, encouraging, and most people genuinely are wanting for you to succeed.

Blogging not only changes your life, it also changes the life of the reader, because blogs are free for the audience and open to the public, on many levels, it is an act of giving. It is a selfless act of service to invest your time, energy, and worldview into a piece of writing and then offer it free to anybody who wants to read it. Others may find inspiration in your writing… and that’s a wonderful feeling. There will always be negativity but I try not to allow those negative comments to overtake me. It’s hard yes, but I also know that what I write is the truth and how I feel or what I’ve experienced.

I’ve tried to write about many of my life events. I try not to be to open but still give enough to be relatable.

I’m not a regular blogger, but I do write when I feel inspired.

In my past 3 years of blogging, I’ve perhaps had 2 blogs that have had mean, nasty or negative responses and reactions. I don’t purposely try and create these responses, I simply write about my or someone close to me, life events and sometimes others can relate a little too well and take offence.

If your considering to start a personal blog, I’d say go for it. Give it a go and if you find it’s not for you, nothing lost, but if you love it! Yippee!

So on that note, happy anniversary No Ordinary Mummy! đź’•

Should we make boys tough? Or should we be more gentle with them?

Psychology Today posted this very interesting article earlier this month. It’s very much worth the read. My husband is a bit ‘old school’ with the belief that boys need ‘tough love’ in order to make them ‘good men’. He often says I’m too soft on our 4 yo.

As a qualified Juvenille counsellor, Ive learned many things but this was one that I believe is really important. I’m glad I found this article and could share it with you. đź’™

Be Worried About Boys, Especially Baby Boys.

Allan Schore discusses the harmful effects of stressing baby boys.

Posted Jan 08, 2017

We often hear that boys need to be toughened up so as not to be sissies. Parent toughness toward babies is celebrated as “not spoiling the baby.” Wrong! These ideas are based on a misunderstanding of how babies develop. Instead, babies rely on tender, responsive care to grow well—with self-control, social skills and concern for others.

A review of empirical research just came out by Allan N. Schore, called “All our sons: The developmental neurobiology and neuroendocrinology of boys at risk.”

This thorough review shows why we should be worried about how we treat boys early in their lives. Here are a few highlights:

Why does early life experience influence boys significantly more than girls?

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Boys mature slower physically, socially and linguistically.
Stress-regulating brain circuitries mature slower in boys prenatally, perinatally and postnatally.
Boys are affected more negatively by early environmental stress, inside and outside the womb, than are girls. Girls have more built-in mechanisms that foster resiliency against stress.
How are boys affected more than girls?

Boys are more vulnerable to maternal stress and depression in the womb, birth trauma (e.g., separation from mother), and unresponsive caregiving (caregiving that leaves them in distress). These comprise attachment trauma and significantly impact right brain hemisphere development—which develops more rapidly in early life than the left brain hemisphere. The right hemisphere normally establishes self-regulatory brain circuitry related to self control and sociality.
Normal term newborn boys react differently to neonatal behavior assessment, showing higher cortisol levels (a mobilizing hormone indicating stress) afterward than girls.
At six months, boys show more frustration than girls do. At 12 months boys show a greater reaction to negative stimuli.
Schore cites the research of Tronick, who concluded that “Boys . . . are more demanding social partners, have more difficult times regulating their affective states, and may need more of their mothers support to help them regulate affect. This increased demandingness would affect the infant boys’ interactive partner” (p. 4).
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What can we conclude from the data?

Boys are more vulnerable to neuropsychiatric disorders that appear developmentally (girls more vulnerable to disorders that appear later). These include autism, early onset schizophrenia, ADHD, and conduct disorders. These have been increasing in recent decades (interestingly, as more babies have been put into daycare settings, nearly all of which provide inadequate care for babies).

Schore states, “in light of the male infant’s slower brain maturation, the secure mother’s attachment-regulating function as a sensitively responsive, interactive affect regulator of his immature right brain in the first year is essential to optimal male socioemotional development.” (p. 14)

“In total, the preceding pages of this work suggest that differences between the sexes in brain wiring patterns that account for gender differences in social and emotional functions are established at the very beginning of life; that the developmental programming of these differences is more than genetically coded, but epigenetically shaped by the early social and physical environment; and that the adult male and female brains represent an adaptive complementarity for optimal human function.” (p. 26)

What does inappropriate care look like in the first years of life?

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“In marked contrast to this growth-facilitating attachment scenario, in a relational growth-inhibiting postnatal environment, less than optimal maternal sensitivity, responsiveness, and regulation are associated with insecure attachments. In the most detrimental growth-inhibiting relational context of maltreatment and attachment trauma (abuse and/or neglect), the primary caregiver of an insecure disorganized–disoriented infant induces traumatic states of enduring negative affect in the child (A.N. Schore, 2001b, 2003b). As a result, dysregulated allostatic processes produce excessive wear and tear on the developing brain, severe apoptotic parcellation of subcortical–cortical stress circuits, and long-term detrimental health consequences (McEwen & Gianaros, 2011). Relational trauma in early critical periods of brain development thus imprints a permanent physiological reactivity of the right brain, alters the corticolimbic connectivity into the HPA, and generates a susceptibility to later disorders of affect regulation expressed in a deficit in coping with future socioemotional stressors. Earlier, I described that slow-maturing male brains are particularly vulnerable to this most dysregulated attachment typology, which is expressed in severe deficits in social and emotional functions.” (p. 13)

What does appropriate care look like in the brain?

“In an optimal developmental scenario, the evolutionary attachment mechanism, maturing during a period of right-brain growth, thus allows epigenetic factors in the social environment to impact genomic and hormonal mechanisms at both the subcortical and then cortical brain levels. By the end of the first year and into the second, higher centers in the right orbitofrontal and ventromedial cortices begin to forge mutual synaptic connections with the lower subcortical centers, including the arousal systems in the midbrain and brain stem and the HPA axis, thereby allowing for more complex strategies of affect regulation, especially during moments of interpersonal stress. That said, as I noted in 1994, the right orbitofrontal cortex, the attachment control system, functionally matures according to different timetables in females and males, and thus, differentiation and growth stabilizes earlier in females than in males (A.N. Schore, 1994). In either case, optimal attachment scenarios allow for the development of a right-lateralized system of efficient activation and feedback inhibition of the HPA axis and autonomic arousal, essential components for optimal coping abilities.” (p. 13)

NOTE: Here is a recent article explaining attachment.

Practical implications for parents, professionals and policy makers:

1. Realize that boys need more, not less, care than girls.

2. Review all hospital birth practices. The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative is a start but not enough. According to a recent review of the research, there is lot of epigenetic and other effects going on at birth.

Separation of mom and baby at birth is harmful for all babies but Schore points out how much more harm it does to boys:

“Exposing newborn male . . . to separation stress causes an acute strong increase of cortisol and can therefore be regarded as a severe stressor” (Kunzler, Braun, & Bock, 2015, p. 862). Repeated separation results in hyperactive behavior, and “changes . . . prefrontal-limbic pathways, i.e. regions that are dysfunctional in a variety of mental disorders” (p. 862).

3. Provide responsive care. Mothers, fathers and other caregivers should avoid any extensive distress in the child—“enduring negative affect.” Instead of the normalized harsh treatment of males (“to make them men”) by letting them cry as babies and then telling them not to cry as boys, by withholding affection and other practices to “toughen them up,” young boys should be treated in the opposite way: with tenderness and respect for their needs for cuddling and kindness.

Note that preterm boys are less able to spontaneously interact with caregivers and so need particularly sensitive care as their neurobiological development proceeds.

4. Provide paid parental leave. For parents to provide responsive care, they need the time, focus and energy. This means a move to paid maternal and paternal leave for at least a year, the time when babies are most vulnerable. Sweden has other family-friendly policies that make it easier for parents to be responsive.

5. One other thing I did not address that Schore does is the effects of environmental toxins. Young boys are more negatively affected by environmental toxins that also disrupt the brain’s right hemisphere development (e.g., plastics like BpA, bis-phenol-A). Schore agrees with Lamphear’s (2015) proposal that the ongoing “rise in developmental disabilities is associated with environmental toxins on the developing brain.” This suggests we should be much more cautious about putting toxic chemicals into our air, soil and water. That is a topic for another blog post.

Conclusion

Of course, we should not just worry about boys but take action for all babies. We need to provide nurturing care for all children. All children expect and need, for proper development, the evolved nest, a baseline for early care which provides the nurturing, stress-reducing care that fosters optimal brain development. My lab studies the Evolved Nest and finds it related to all the positive child outcomes we have studied.

The Field Trip.

I’m not one to promote anything that I don’t believe in.

Let me start by saying I’m not affiliated with The Field Trip in anyway, nor is this a paid post.

I was approached by The Field Trip a while ago now as the CEO’s wife follows my blog. I offered to write about it back then as after looking at the website I thought it was an awesome organisation. Something that I think is well purposed and that there should be more organisations such as The Field Trip. I however got side tracked when trying to workout how to get all that they do in a single post.

So many good things to say about this organisation however I didn’t want to write an essay. Instead I’ve decided to let you make up your own mind.

The Field Trip is a metaphoric journey, empowering young people to find their passion, peers and path.

The Field Trip’s model for measuring impact and success is inspired by the work of Jane Gleeson-White, and her book: Six Capitals, which highlights a recent revolution in attempting to measure humanity’s impact on the world.

This program helps to enable today’s youth purpose, and the ability to achieve things that many adults perhaps thought they could not achieve.

It offers youth the encouragement and foresight to push themselves in a safe environment.

The Field Trip is a youth leadership program with a difference – a metaphoric journey, opening young people’s eyes to possibilities and opportunities which help them achieve their unique potential and create a positive legacy for the local and global community.

Please, do yourself a favour and have a look at the attached web link.

http://www.thefieldtrip.co/purpose

Is technology ruining our children?

I’ve said a few times that I think technology makes children anti social and causes many other issues.

Here is yet another great read on negative affects that technology has on our children.

This is possibly the third article on this subject that has came into my feed within about a month.

I’m a big believer in everything in moderation. I grew up playing outside, using my imagination and enjoying the outdoors – yes I know, I grew up in a small country town and my childhood was approx 3 decades ago, however I would not change it for the world.

I limit my children’s screen time.

I’ve seen the affects technology can have on children. What negative behaviour it can create. I’m not saying to can it totally, I just think we should all perhaps think prior to passing our little ones our smart phones to ‘keep them quiet or occupied’. Why not read a book with them, play eye spy, kick a ball outside, start drawing, explore in your garden or in a park, collect leaves, make an indoor cubby? So many other options and ways to create fun with our children that does not require technology.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/mental-wealth/201508/screentime-is-making-kids-moody-crazy-and-lazy

Smart Watches and Students.

Smart watches and school students .

It was recently bought to my attention the about of technology that school aged children have and or want.

My 2 are still quite young do have not got caught up in wanting iPads, iPhones or other digital stuff. Although my 4yo boy will sometimes ask for my iPad, it’s not an every day occurrence nor does he have his own. My little girl is only 18mo so is still to young to even realise what they are, thank goodness.

Anyway, I was in my local shopping centre and saw a group of boys probably about 12years old all with apple iwatch’s I was quite shocked. So young with such advanced technology- oh and expensive technology.

So it had me thinking many things-
1, wow that’s a lot of money on a young child.
2, do they need this type of ‘smart’ technology? 3, do they also have a ‘regular’ phone?
4, what is society coming to when such young children have such advanced technology?

Don’t get me wrong, I’d love an iPhone watch / Apple Watch, whatever they are called, but I already have a watch and an iPhone, so would it replace both? Or would I still need my iPhone? How smart is this Apple Watch?

It also had me think of the watches capabilities and how a young person would use it, and the first thing that came to my mind was fear.

They can access all types of things through search engines so is this technology taking away innocence?

Or is it creating other things, like enabling cheating in school exams?

I may be overreacting here or thinking ‘worst cade’ but as a mother with two little ones my mind does leave me pondering what may be the future for them.

I know that recently a very affluent Sydney boys school put a ban on lap tops for students as they found that the students were not always using third brain, instead quick to google answers and also their hand writing became quite poor.

It’s also been proven that children who do type notes, rather than hand write them, don’t take in as much knowledge as they don’t have to use their brain for things such as spelling and grammar as laptops and computers have spelling and grammar auto corrections.

So with this in mind, will they ban the smart watch also?

Can children cheat by googling and swears or sending a text message or email of the question to another person and have answers sent back?

Or even taking a photo and sending the questions to someone for answers. And there goes my mind into overdrive.

Are these technologies being used correctly, are they safe to use and how can they be monitored for our society?

What are your thoughts?

I would love to hear from you.

Noordinarymummy@gmail.com

The lonely parent.

I know most think that being a parent, has you doing many play dates and mummy coffee catch ups.

Not always, I sometime find myself feeling very lonely.

Sure both my little ones have full schedules of learning and fun daily activities, however I sometimes feel lost within myself and have found that a lot of my friends are too busy also. Doing their own things.

I have an amazing best friend though who is not yet a mummy herself and she is always keen to catch up or make plans.

It’s almost like, once you have children and you become unimportant or not ‘cool enough’ anymore.

I struggle as I put my children first, always and no matter what.

Perhaps I should make more time for myself. To do things without my little ones, but then I feel guilty. It really is a catch 22. For me anyway.

I know they are only little for a short period of time. I want to be there for everything. I want to see their faces as the explore and grow, I want to watch them experience all these firsts.

It’s ok to feel lonely. Your life has changed, mine has for the better as I have two children who I adore. I know someday they will think I’m ‘uncool’ and they will want to be with their friends. But until that time comes, I’m relishing in them, even if it means I sometimes feel disconnected and lonely.

9 Empowering Actions for Lonely Parents

The 3rd child?

So on the weekend my husband bought up the ‘3rd’ child question….

We currently have a 3yo boy and a 17mo girl. I feel complete, and extremely blessed. One of each is perfect for me. I have enough time with each and was questioning how would I manage another? We are in a great routine, they play so well together, they both sleep through the night, they adore each other, why ‘rock the boat’ so to speak.

Well firstly I was extremely shocked that my hubby bought this subject up, as he was the one that never wanted children. I basically gave him the ultimatum. He knew that when he proposed he was definitely having babies with me. He still proposed so he must not have worried too much about this.

Once we had our little man he then again said, no more babies I want my wife back and one is plenty, well again we had a chat and yes, we now also have a daughter. We have 2 amazing, gorgeous, smart, fun, happy and healthy little people. I feel completely besotted by them and am happy with the 2 children so you can imagine the shock when hubby bought up a third.

He was away last week for business and clearly missed us. His conversation Saturday went something like this.
‘Babe, do you ever get a pang for another baby?’

Well I nearly fell off my chair and replied, ‘yes I do, but I thought we agreed that the 2 that we have are perfect?’.

Hubby’s response, ‘after being away the past week I really missed you, little man and princess, I was thinking about having a third with you, would you consider it? Would you put your body through it again?’ (FYI, I get really bad morning/ all day sickness, with complicated pregnancy and difficult to actually fall pregnant)

My response, ‘I would put my body through it, absolutely, but we have 2 amazing little ones, do we really want a third?’

Hubby, ‘Hmmm I know, I just think how great a mum you are, how much our kids adore you and how beautiful our kids are, gives me pangs’.

Me, ‘Hmmm’.

So this was never a position I thought I’d be in. I’m pretty sure I’m completely happy with 2, I am one of 3 and remember that one of my siblings was always left out. I feel like 2 always play together and 1 is on the outer? Not sure. I think I’d want 4 rather than 2.

I know I have enough love.

We will see…..

http://www.scarymommy.com/the-day-i-fell-in-love-with-having-two/?utm_source=FB

And what century do we live in?

Please remind me, what year / century are we living in?

– “It’s so fascinating to learn about how people used to live — especially when we discover that not much has really changed.
However, sometimes you come across some old traditions that you simply can’t believe people ever followed — like these odd dating rituals throughout history.

But what women in the 1950s were expected to do for their husbands? Well, those traditions have certainly flown right out the window!
In May of 1955, Housekeeping Monthly published an article entitled, “The Good Wife’s Guide,” detailing all the ways that a wife should act and how best she can be a partner to her husband and a mother to her children.

It may feel a little strange to accept these rules today, but it remains so interesting to see how society once behaved.”

Click the link to read more…..

http://www.littlethings.com/1950s-good-housewife-guide/?utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=postplanner&utm_source=facebook.com

ThermoMix heaven….

Easy, healthy cooking.

About a year ago something happened that literally turned things around for me in the kitchen. I met Caroline, my Thermomix consultant. She’s also a mummy with two young children so we clicked straight away over shared experiences.

Together she showed me how this one piece of equipment could help me in so many ways – not just making it possible to make healthy and tasty options but to do so quickly and easily, which of course meant I didn’t resort to store-bought yuckies. And having more free time was a bonus I didn’t anticipate but certainly appreciate.

Now I’m not big on selling things but seriously, this ‘thing’ she showed me, was about to turn my kitchen experience around.

Even better, I could get those nutrients into my littlies, especially my fussy young man, without resorting to a battle. Of course, trying new tastes often results in the reflex spit-out but a bit like the sleeping patterns persistence can pay off and it took less time than I imagined.

Yes, a Thermomix is a considerable investment, but for me it’s also been a Godsend and possibly one of my best purchases as a parent. They also have many options to almost ‘lay buy’ or ‘pay off’ this piece of kitchen equipment. I use mine almost every day and for everything from a smoothie, making porridge, chopping vegetables, cooking a whole meal at once, including steaming vegetable in the varoma, whilst making a pasta sauce in the jug!

This 1 item has eliminated so many from my kitchen. It chops, blends, steams, boils, stirs, cooks, poaches, purées and all on a timer. So no boiling over, burning pans or constant stiring. Best of all it comes with a recipe chip, which is amazing! It has hundreds of easy to make recipes, that takes no time at all to prepare and cook. Well actually this machine pretty much does everything. The LCD screen works a bit like an iPad. It prompts you all the way so you basically cannot stuff up! Easy!

Not only is Caroline always just a phone call away to help with cooking and recipe tips, but as well as a Thermomix consultant I’ve also gained a friend.

Your interested to know more, please feel free to contact Caroline direct. I’ve popped her details at the bottom of this post.

Or jump onto the ThermoMix website and check it out for yourself!

Here’s one of our favourite sneaky veg recipes:

Carrot and Zucchini Choc Muffins

Ingredients:
1 medium zucchini
1 medium carrot
30g raw sugar
130g chickpea flour
30g raw cacao
½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp ground cinnamon
Pinch nutmeg
Pinch salt
30g almonds
30g macadamia nuts
70g grapeseed oil
2 eggs

Method
Preheat oven to 180 degrees and line a muffin tray
Grate zucchini and carrot speed 7 for 2 seconds, transfer to a bowl
Add all ingredients from raw sugar to macadamia nuts and mix speed 5 for 6 seconds
Add oil and eggs and mix speed 5 for 20 seconds
Add back zucchini and carrot and mix speed 2 for 5 seconds on reverse
Transfer mixture to prepared muffin tray and bake for 20-25 minutes
Transfer to wire tray to cool for 10 minutes

I like to serve these with vanilla coconut custard…( one of Caroline’s recipes).

These can even be frozen so you always have a supply on hand!

If you would like to contact Caroline to arrange a cooking demonstration or purchase you own Thermomix you can contact her on 0402 483 803 or carolinesomma@hotmail.com