Tag Archives: baby

Parental advice?

Ha ha ha!

Now I’m no one to be handing out parental advice, however I have had 2 different situations with my 2 very different children.

I received, and still do revive plenty of ‘advice’ from others. I listen yes, however I choose what I want to take on board and stuff I choose to pass on. We all have our own ideas on what is right or best for us, what we are willing to accept and what we are willing to try.

My first born, my now 3 year old boy. Well I de everything the ‘wrong’ way.
Perhaps because I was only learning myself? Perhaps because I couldn’t bare to hear him whimper, let alone cry?
Perhaps because he was my first born and I wanted to be awake all night? 😉😆😏 (not)

I’m not quite sure? However I would rock him to sleep every night, whilst I would pace up our hallway. I did this until he was 2 years old. I’d then carefully put him in his cot, if he would stir I’d then have my hand resting on his chest for ‘reassurance’. I’d then sit in the floor with my hand in between the cot slats (almost like a jail cell door) and slowly and gently pat him until he would go back to sleep. This could take hours (no I’m not joking)

He would also wake 5 or 6 times per night, sometimes more and then the whole ‘routine’ would start again. The picking up, holding, rocking, shushing, pacing the hallway, the resting hand, gentle pats whilst sitting on the floor and hand dropped through the side of the cot….. Over and over until he was fast asleep.

When I was almost due to have my second child I couldn’t bare the thought of doing this with 2 little ones. I thought I’d go crazy and not manage so we got an amazing sleep nanny in who helped with our little guy and after 4 nights of her advice. Guess what? He slept through and to this day, he still does. He goes to bed at 6:15pm, is asleep by 6:30pm and sleeps through until about 6:30am. With no pacing, no patting, no shushing , nothing. We brush his teeth, read a book, then it’s lights out with him alone in his bed calming himself to sleep. No pitter patter coming out, nothing. What a game changer!

Sure I miss the extra cuddles and laying with him, however I know it’s good for him to self settle and good for me to not be over tired. Amazing how much more energy I have and less snappy I am with getting a good nights sleep and rest. For the both of us. Because he also needs his sleep in order to grow, learn and be attentive and energy to play.

Our sleep nanny is a wonderful woman Jenny. I have attached her website below for those in Sydney NSW Australia, interested in her services.

Rest assured when number 2 came along, I didn’t do any of that. And you know what? She survived. I survived and we are both still alive and well.

She may just be a ‘better’ sleeper. She is a different person yes. From 4 weeks old she slept through the night. 6pm until 6:30am every night. Now I’m not telling you this to brag. I’m telling you this as all children are different.

When my little girl had her 4 month growth spurt or as some would call it a ‘sleep regression’ it was hard. She did wake for 2 weeks straight every 2-3 hours every night and I was beside myself as I was used to getting a good nights rest and a full 8 hours sleep. So I called in Jenny again. And, within 3 nights our little girl was sleeping through again.

She had her first birthday over the weekend just passed and has slept through every night since she was 5 months old. Thanks to Jenny!

Jenny didn’t punish her, didn’t have her scream the house down, none of that. She basically monitored her over night (let me sleep through) and then left me with her tips / ideas on what may work to get our little girl to sleep through, and yep, they worked.

Now this may not be for everyone. However I was feeling overwhelmed, I needed a full nights sleep for my sanity and also to re connect with my husband.

We would be sitting watching TV or eating a lovely meal, or just spending time together and each night, without fail, the pitter patter of little feet.

I can totally relate to this ‘Scary Mommy’ post. Gosh I think most of us can. It’s worth the read for the little giggle at least. 😉😊

http://www.scarymommy.com/earlier-bedtimes-healthy-children/
http://www.solvebabies.com.au

She is here!

For all my loyal readers I want to apologies for my lack of posts lately.

I’ve been a little pre occupied of and I hope that you understand why, my little princess arrived 3 weeks early!

It has been a whirlwind of emotion and I am yet again besotted.

I thought I knew what love was when approx 2.5years ago I welcomed my gorgeous lil man into this world.

Today I feel absolutely besotted, proud, fulfilled and over joyed with love and happiness all over again.

My lil family is now complete.
Two precious little cherubs to love, adore, enjoy, watch grow and protect for forever more.

Let me take you through my journey.

I had been on weekly ultrasounds and checkups with my midwife as my little miss was measuring small. On the lower 10th percentile on the growth chart which had our midwife and obstetric is slightly concerned.

Now hubby not myself are big units however our amazing little man was born 3.53kg and 53cm long. Our lil miss was measuring approx 2.3kg. Quite a big difference.

After my ECG – where they turned my little princess successfully she engaged straight away, I was displayed though however at that time, I could have dilated easily as my cervix was apparently ‘ripe’ and ‘soft’.

Going back to those past 2 weeks, I had my regular weekly ultrasound on the Tuesday followed by my midwife appointment on the Thursday. After the appointment I had a CTG which is a monitor that listens to the baby’s heart. My little miss had a strong healthy and regular heart beat which was reassuring.

She was still measuring small so I then went onto daily check ups. So with my little man, packed up for a few hours we were in the hospital room. Mummy hooked up to these monitoring machines to check little miss and my little man – who was so well behaved, watching a DVD and snacking.

After being monitored for 6 days straight we were advised that our little miss hadn’t grown within 2 weeks, not gained any weight nor had her head or stomach circumference had changed and that the best and safest option would be an induction.

The induction was set for 3pm on Wednesday. I had my bag packed my little miss’s bag packed and my mother had came to stay with my little man.

I was filled with various emotion as id never left my little man before for any longer than 10 hours. So leaving him over night I was heart broken. I was however exited that the time has come to meet my little girl.

After getting the brief on how I was going to be induced I was feeling very nervous.

The obstetrician decided that cervadil was going to be the better option as its a slow release. Releasing 2mg of the induction drug every 6 hours over a 12 hour period. A long process but as my lil miss was small they didn’t want complications and wanted it to be as stress free as possible. Well that didn’t really happen….

After the cervadil was inserted approx 2 hours later my contractions started.

They were quite intense and were lasting a few minutes each time and approx 15 minutes apart. With this I got cramps down my right leg and in my right bottox cheek – very painful. The contractions were coming on closer and closer then at 10pm after 5 hours of fast intense contractions my little miss was distressed and her heart was beating irregular.

They had to stop the labor and calm her. They took the cervadil out and I was put on a drip and given morphine to stop the contractions as I was also still not dilating. I was told to rest over night and they would try again in the morning.

I was quite exhausted and tried my best to sleep but was being constantly monitored and slept with the CTG machine on me which also limited my comfort level but that was nothing as I wanted what was best for my little girl.

The next morning the midwife and obstetrician decided that perhaps the best thing to do would be to break my waters and see how my body reacts and if I dilate that way.

Well at 9:25am my waters were broken and within 15 minutes I was in full on contractions again.

The contractions were lasting over 3 minutes and were only 2 minutes apart. Very fast and very intense. They became faster and longer and closer together. The whole labor only lasted 2 hours as my little miss was born at 11:25am.

As the contractions were so intense I had no time for pain relief. I had gas only. Which helped a little but as the contractions were so intense I struggled to breath and catch my breath so was also ‘blacking out’ due to the pain. Within the 2hours that I was in labour, my husband recalls me blanking out 4 times.

I also hemoraghed and lost a great amount of blood that required me to have 6 bags of fluid administered via a drip followed by a iron infusion that took over 6 hours via a drip. They considered a blood transfusion but we’re hoping that the fluids would work, which they did.

My little miss was born at 1.88kg and 44.5cm long. Teeny tiny but healthy! Yay!

I was exhausted and felt completely out of it, my little miss was also exhausted as she was so small she was tube fed for the first 3 days. I expressed my breast milk and it was syringed into a tube that went down her nose.

I felt relived that she was ok and born strong and healthy however also was upset that she was tube fed. It was for the best though and did only last 3 days.

After 5 nights in the hospital we were discharged and allowed home. Back with my little man and husband. Back into my comfort zone and able to settle into my family of 4.

I feel so complete and in love. I have these 2 amazing children whom I love more than imaginable. No words to describe the happiness or fulfilment that I have for these 2 little people.

Since being home my baby girl has had continual weight gain and is now 2.14kg her 00000 clothing is too big but she is going to grow into them.

Stay tuned and I promise to write again soon.

Dilation

So I have approx 19 days until my little princess arrives. Well her due date is 19 days away 🙂

As I get closer to my due date I’m getting lots of questions, are you dilated? Are you having contractions? Are you experiencing labour symptoms? etc

With my first child (little boy) the labour was only 5 hours and apart from being posterior then needing vacuum and forceps, it was pretty straight forward. I actually didn’t know that I was in labour.

So this time around, I’m really not too sure what to expect so of course, I’ve been doing lots and lots of reading!

An interesting read that I came across is the article below on ‘dilation’ not sure I’d check myself however if your expecting and as curious as I am, have a read.
*************************************************
Dilation – How To Check Without Checking

Recently I have noticed a few blogs writing about dilation and it’s benefits, as well as how to do it in other ways besides simple vaginal exams. This is my take on the subject, modified from the hand out that I have available for my clients.

Why Check?
One of the biggest repeat questions a doula/caregiver can hear during labor and birth is ‘how far along am I’. Some women would prefer not to know, some women could care less, and some women desire this knowledge almost habitually.

As with any intervention in labor and birth, cervical checks carry risk. The risks include: increased risk of infection, PROM, false readings (i.e. human error), and regret/disappointment at any ‘lack’ of dilation.

Regardless of women’s reasons for wanting to know their dilation, it is helpful for a doula/care provider to have more than one trick/way of knowing where mom may be, beyond timing contractions.

Some methods that can help a caregiver or doula know how dilated a woman is during her labor include:
Teach self exams
Sounds she makes
Smell of the room/mom
Show
Emotions
The bottom line
Physical Make-Up
Fundal height
Symphysis Crease
Mexican Hot Legs
Pressure
Methods

All of these methods are generalities. It is important to remember that women are not textbooks, they are organic, living, evolving organisms that there are many exceptions to every rule. Each of these cannot be applied to all women.

Self Exams
I have found that the best explanation of self exams can be found from Gloria Lemay. It is a practically applicable explanation that gets good results.
“The best way to do it when hugely pregnant is to sit on the toilet with one foot on the floor and one up on the seat of the toilet. Put two fingers in and go back towards your bum. The cervix in a pregnant woman feels like your lips puckered up into a kiss. On a non-pregnant woman it feels like the end of your nose. When it is dilating, one finger slips into the middle of the cervix easily (just like you could slide a finger into your mouth
while puckering for a kiss). As the dilation progresses, the inside of that hole becomes more like a taut elastic band and by 5 cm dilated (5 finger widths) it is a perfect rubbery circle like one of those Mason jar rings that you use for canning, and about that thick.” – Gloria Lemay

Sounds of Birth
A non-vaginal indicator that can help to detect progress is notable sounds that a woman makes in labor.

Usually, early labor (0-4cm) means little to no ‘birth’ noise; mom can talk with little to some effort through a contraction.

Around 4-5cm dilation (for a primip) talk with be rather difficult to near impossible, noises may still be quiet, but consistently open voweled or a resonating hum.

5-7cm will typically be presented with louder noises, near to completely impossible to talk through a contraction, and sounds may become repetitive or staccato.

If a woman is a silent laborer, a good way to get a handle on her vocal indicators is to explain what you are about to do… then wait until a contraction starts, and ask a question that necessitates a sentence-long answer. The way in which she is able or unable to answer you during a contraction should be rather reliable.

Smell
Many birth professionals have spoken about the smell of birth.

Birth smells come about around 6-8cm dilation and are a very good indicator of good active labor. When a mom says that she wants to transfer to her place of birth around 6-8cm, I typically will go by smell and mom’s emotions.

The active labor smell is not so much the earthy/wet smell of amniotic fluid, and is not the sweet smell on a woman’s breath during labor (ever notice a laboring mom’s breath always smells sweet?)..

Instead, this smell is deep, dusky (not musky), heavy, familiar… the smell of deep and ancient work. It is something that is hard to explain, but something to definitely be on the look (smell) out for until you have familiarized yourself with it and can use this as a good indicating factor of active labor.

Show
A woman may or may not ‘show’ any bloody or mucousy discharge at the onset of labor, but blood and mucous often come in copious amounts, usually during contractions, when a woman is around 6-8cm. If a woman’s water broke earlier in the labor, you may see a second gush around 6cm.

Emotions
Early labor (1-4cm, oftentimes) often means mom is in the “this is it” stage – happy, excitable, a good sense of humor, perhaps even denial that she is really in labor.

Moving into active labor (4-6cm, oftentimes) often means that mom is still smiley and may even laugh at little things being said between contractions. Moving in and out of conversation as her contractions go and come.

Active labor (5-7cm, oftentimes) generally means she is more irritated at commonplace conversation or people trying to distract her with quips. It may take her quite awhile after a contraction leaves to become ‘re-acclimated’ to the room, or she may choose to simply remain in her birthing space and not interact with the room. (an aside, the room should be acclimating to her, although it is not always the case, unfortunately).

Around transition (usually, 7cmish) even between contractions, a woman can become doubtful, unable to make concrete decisions (“I don’t know” in response to questions), or irrational, a good indicator that mom is on the homestretch.

This method can be tricky, though, as this ‘emotional mapping’ can be skewed from a babies position or a woman’s labor make-up.

If it is from baby settling in a ‘malpresentation’, a mom might experience both an early transition (anywhere from 2cm to 4cm dilation, depending on if she is a primip or multip) and a later transition.

Depending on her labor make-up, some women can have an ‘early transition’ (4-5cm), especially for long-latent early labor patterns with discomfort disproportionate to her cervical dilation, but it will often still mean rapid dilation to complete.

Bottom/Purple Line
A study conducted and published in the Lancet hypothesized that the purple line that ‘grows’ up the natal cleft can be a great indicator of cervical dilatation. The line begins at the anal margin at the start of labour and rises like a “mercury thermometer”.

When it reaches the top, the woman is fully dilated. The authors propose that an “increase in intrapelvic pressure causes congestion in the … veins around the sacrum, which, in conjunction with the lack of subcutaneous tissue over the sacrum, results in this line of red purple discoloration”.
The best way to describe this is, looking at the anus, a purple line will appear and, throughout labor, move up the natal cleft (butt crack for us laypeople)
The picture shown at right is a fully dilated woman and her purple line.

Physical Make-Up
Many women will find that, as they get very close to the pushing stage, they may exhibit signs similar to the flu. If a mom suddenly feels the urge to vomit or complains of nausea, has a flushed face and feels warm, and/or begins trembling uncontrollably, mom may be at the cusp of second stage. Vomiting alone can be emotions, hormones, or fatigue alone. Flushed face is a good sign of 6-7cm, when noticed alone. And trembling uncontrollably, alone, might mean fatigue or fever. These indicators are most reliable when 2 or all 3 are noticed together.

Other physical indicators of 6cm and beyond:
involuntary curling of toes during contractions, even when the rest of her body is loose and relaxed (6-8cm)
if standing, instead of curling her toes, mom may stand on her toes while leaning over something (6-8cm)
goose bumps on her bottom (buttocks) and upper thighs (9-10cm)

Fundal Height
Anne Frye’s Volume II of Holistic Midwifery speaks of the fundal height of being a very reliable indicator of mom’s cervical dilation.

When the uterus contracts, it swells upwards and pulls the cervix upward with it, causing more dilation. Around 40 weeks, you can get around 5 finger-breadths of measurement between the fundus and the xyphoid.

As mom dilates, the distance from the xyphoid to the fundus decreases at a rate of about 2cm per fingerbreadths. This way of measuring is not as reliable in primips, but much more reliable in multips. When there is about 1 finger-width or less of space between the fundus and xiphoid, mom is near to at 10 cm dilation.

To do this, have mom (or partner) ‘mark’ her measurement at the first thought of labor. Taking into consideration her starting point (from prior VEs (Vaginal Exams)), use this as a start point.

Unfortunately, this assessment during labor must be done at the height of a contraction and mom must be on her back. Using the chart below, determine fingerbreadths (fb) between the fundus and xiphoid:
5 fb = no dilation
4 fb = 2 cm
3 fb = 4 cm
2 fb = 6 cm
1 fb = 8 cm
0 fm = complete

Symphysis Crease
Late dilation can be measured by watching the symphysis crease. It’s visible mostly in mom’s who have lower BMI prepregnancy. As labor progresses and babies shoulder’s descend along with dilation, a line/crease will become visible directly above (parallel to) the symphysis. It will become wider latitudinally as labor progresses.

Around transition, it will be about 3/4 of the way across. If the line is nearly all the way across, mom is most likely pretty close to, or already fully, dilated and will probably start pushing soon.

To do this, check right above mom’s symphysis (pubic bone). If there is a line at all, mom is probably at least 5cm. If you are working with a woman who is intent on laboring at home as long as possible, the crease may be a good indicator for her labor, a drawback is that it can also mean ‘too late’.

Another drawback to this is if baby is riding high throughout the early and active labor stage (aka a ‘late descender’).

Mexican Hot Legs
As the birthing woman’s body works harder, blood is withdrawn from the extremities to be utilized by the womb. Thus, the woman’s legs get progressively colder from the ankle to the knee as labor progresses. At the start of birth, the whole leg will be warm. At around 5cm, the leg will be coldre from the ankle to around mid-calf than it is above the calf. Once the whole leg feels coldre up to the knee, then the urge to push should shortly follow.

This technique is less reliable if the woman is having an epidural, as the drugs will also affect the temperature of the hands and legs. If a woman is birthing in water then she’d need to be on dry land for around 20 minutes to allow the temperature in her legs to be measured accurately. – Kath Harbisher

Pressure
As baby descends, pressure will be felt at different levels on her back. This will not necessarily give dilation information, but will help in determining position/station of baby within the pelvic outlet. This pressure will move from the rim of the pelvis all the way down onto the coccyx (tailbone).

As doulas can tell you, as mom continues to dilate, and baby continues to move down the pelvis, the pressure she feels will go lower. This is why back massages turn into butt massages turn into tailbone massages. 🙂

By the time that mom is 8-10cm and 0 to +1 station, the small rectangular spot of mom’s buttocks (tailbone area) will bow outward as her pelvis makes room for babies decent. This usually means that, if you are at home and mom was planning a hospital or birth center birth, you very well may have waited too long.

Another indicator is that, if mom is feeling pressure between her legs, vomits, and her water breaks simultaneously, she is probably 7-8cm or more.

A final indicator is, regardless of dilation, if a mom is passing stool involuntarily with her contractions, whether she has the urge to push or not, she is either holding a posterior baby, fully dilated and about to start pushing, or baby is at a low station (more common without full dilation in multips).

In Conclusion
Dilation of the cervix can tell us how far open you are, but not how close you are to the destination of birthing your baby. Listening to your body and the cues it gives can help us know where you are at in your journey though. Some women’s journeys take them through jogs and shortcuts, while others are mountainous day-hikes.

More than anything else, these tools can help women to plan their next steps on their birthing journeys; when to move to their expected place of birth, when to enter the birthing pool, what their labor pattern might indicate, what is true labor vs what is practice.

Breech babies

Breech babies.

What is a breech baby?

Breech means that your baby is in a bottom-down position. If this is your first baby, the baby will probably settle into a head-down position in your pelvis around the eighth month of pregnancy. This settling position is called a vertex or cephalic position. When labour begins, nearly all (actually 96 per cent) of babies are lying head down in the uterus, but a few (about 3-4 per cent), will settle into a bottom-first, or breech, position.

I’m currently 36 weeks pregnant and had an ultrasound earlier last week only to find that my little miss has turned breech!

As soon as I saw this on the screen I cried. I’ve heard many horror stories about breech babies and how you can only deliver via c section and unfortunately for me, the select few people that I know who have had c sections – have unfortunately had terrible experiences. Not the most positive stories to be reassured by.

My first reaction – apart from crying was to do research on how I can turn my baby naturally or at least get her to turn herself back into the head first position.

I then started to research as to why some babies turn breech. My initial reaction was, pending your circumstances of course, and I’m not too spiritualistic but do have a tendency to prefer ‘natural’ techniques, remedies and options. So my initial thought was – gosh what has made my bubba want to be so close to my heart?

Apparently I am partially right – pending what you believe. I was in a circumstance a few days ago where I felt very uncomfortable with my surroundings. There was a certain person at the same venue as I was who made me feel very uneasy and as soon as I saw this person, my body covered itself in goose bumps and I felt a hot flush and got a horrible rush come over me. Approx 30 minutes after I felt my little miss become unsettled in my tummy and I knew something wasn’t right. Yes she has turned herself around into breech position! Again breech is where the baby’s head is up under the mothers chest / heart.

An old wives tale is that if the mother is under stress, heartache, or feeling anxious about anything the baby will turn breech to listen to the mothers heart beat and therefore feel more settled.

After my experience I believe that this could definitely be a factor as to why my little girl has decided to flip.

So back to the research!

I’ve read many ways to try and have her turn herself back into the vaginal birthing position some I’ve listed below.

Please note though – I am no medical expert, if you are pregnant – always, always seek medical advice and if your baby is also breech, please take the advice of your doctor.

An option that I’m having is an ECV this can be performed at 36 weeks, by your doctor or midwife.

This is where you have the chance to have your baby turned manually into a head-down position. This process is called external cephalon version (ECV).

ECV is more likely to work if you’ve given birth vaginally before. Sometimes, a baby refuses to budge or rotates back into a breech position so it is not a 100% going to work for all baby’s – or it may work but these little people do have a mind of their own and may very well turn back into breech position.

An ECV may be not recommended if you have bleeding during your pregnancy, if your baby has a short umbilical cord, if you have oligohydramnios (less amniotic fluid), if you have a scar on your uterus, if you are carrying more than one baby or that you are likely to need a caesarean section for other reasons.

In Australia, 87.1 per cent of babies who were in a breech position at full term (37 weeks or more of pregnancy) were born by caesarean section. This figure includes single babies as well as twins and more, where often there is one baby in a breech position. More than 95 per cent of singleton babies (where there is only one baby) who are breech at full term are born by caesarean section.

In most cases the caesarean is planned and the mother does not go into labour, though for 20 per cent of singleton breech babies the mother does go into labour before the baby is born by caesarean. In this situation the caesarean is usually more urgent.

A review of the research on breech birth in 2004 suggested that it was safer for breech babies to be born by Caesarean section compared to a vaginal birth.

Some midwives and doctors challenge this research. They feel that a normal birth is just as safe, provided that the midwife or doctor has the special skills needed to help a woman give birth to a breech baby vaginally.

Further studies have also supported the view that where there are experienced doctors available and strict guidelines applied, vaginal birth can be as safe as caesarean birth.

There is also no evidence that the way a term breech baby is born has any effect on his long term health.

A few other methods that I’ve read about to try are :

Bring your knee’s-to-chest position by kneeling on your bed or on the floor with your bottom in the air and your hips flexed at slightly more than 90 degrees (don’t let your thighs press against your bump).

Try to keep your head, shoulders, and upper chest flat on your mattress. Maintain this position for 15 minutes every two waking hours for five consecutive days. In one study of 71 breech babies, 65 turned when their mother adopted the knee to cheat position.

OR

Try laying on your back with your hips slightly elevated and again your hips and knees flexed. Gently roll from side to side for 10 minutes and repeat this manoeuvre three times a day. If you have had any back pain, pelvic pain or hip pain during your pregnancy, do talk to your midwife or physiotherapist before you try this.

At the end of the day it might be that your baby prefers to lie in the breech position; about 5 per cent even turn back to breech position after a successful ECV. If this is the case, a c section will probably be recommended but, depending on your baby’s exact position, a vaginal birth may still be possible.

I personally am hoping that my baby turns as I really am scared of a c section.

Have you had any experiences such as a c section or breech baby? If so please contact me, I’d love to hear your experience.

Another great website that a friend of mine also recommended – she is a midwife 🙂 is below; good luck!

http://spinningbabies.com

Battle of the names!

Battle of the names!

So as my due date approaches hubby and I are trying to come up with names that we both like and can of course agree on to babe our little girl – Yep we are having a little princess.

My family is now complete, a little man and a little girl.

I only ever wanted 2 children and thought it would be ideal to have one of each – however I would have been extremely happy with 2 boys but am blessed to have been given the gift of one of each. I feel like my little family is perfect.

Now the tough part – coming up with a suitable name that suits both hubby’s name, my name and her big brothers name.

Hubby’s name is 3 syllables but we shorten it to single syllable, my name is also 3 syllables again we shorten it to single and my little mans name is single syllable so of course I’d like another single syllable name.

Problem is that we agree on something then hubby tells someone and they of course have negative comments which then puts him off that name.

Why is people feel the need to pass comment on things that don’t directly include them?

I mean I find it rude when people comment on chosen names and what bugs me most, is that it’s not even their child that is being named so why do they feel they have the right to pass comment on such things?

My little guy wants to call her twinkle but of course that’s out of the question but then there are others who are making suggestions also and putting down our choices. It has nothing to do with them right? Am I alone with my thoughts on this matter?

Naming a child is quite personal and there are many factors to consider including if it goes with the surname – our of which is quite peculiar so that’s a major consideration. Then there is the middle name factor, I’m quite traditional in the sense that I like the middle babe to be a family name possibly derived from a grandparents name or close relation. So coming up with a first name can be tricky!

What are some of your favourite girls names that are single syllable?

My list is as follows;

We had however agreed on a first and middle name for our little princess, though after a few various inputs today when hubby’s disclosed what we liked to some people and they passed negative comments, he now doesn’t like what we had chosen.

Back to square one!

Ava
Eve
Bo
Mila
Milly
Lou
Ella
Belle

Then a few others that Id consider;

Arabella
Eadie
Avery
Chloe
Codi
Phoebe
Halle
Leni
Lola
Lila
Layla
Lexi

Tell me your favourites. I’d love to hear from you.

Please also tell me your thoughts on people having their say on your choice of baby name.

I know everyone has an opinion but should it really be their choice on that you call your child?

Email me at – noordinarymummy@gmail.com

Light exercise?

So yes, I’m pregnant, gaining weight, eating lots to satisfy cravings and because I’m feeling so nauseous, I’m not really feeling like exercising. Sad but true.

I am however 15 weeks through and although I am still quite lethargic and vomiting most days I know that being mobile and exercising during my pregnancy is both good for me and my bub.

I didn’t exercise during my first pregnancy but I was working full time and my job allowed me to get out if the office and see clients which allowed me to do lots of walking. I also walked to and from the bus stop to get to work and always got off a few stops shorter than needed and walked. Simply because it felt good and I enjoyed it. I still gained 17kg with my first pregnancy however I ate reasonably well and found that the weight fell off and I was back to pre baby weight within 7 weeks from giving birth to my little man. I think perhaps this was because I was running in adrenalin as my bub who is now 2 didn’t sleep, suffered reflux and I was simply a thousand miles per hour!

Exercise is good for you in pregnancy, and is perfectly safe. However, it’s thought that as many as three quarters of women with a healthy pregnancy don’t do enough exercise.

Taking daily exercise won’t harm you or your baby, and can also help to prevent pregnancy and birth complications, such as pre-eclampsia. It may also help you to have a shorter labour and increase your chances of giving birth vaginally. Let’s face it, labour can be very intense and it felt like I had ran 10 marathons by the time by 5hour labour had delivered my gorgeous little man. I’m not sure how some women survive long labours. I certainly praise them!

Being active and exercising regularly before and during pregnancy will help with –

Keep pregnancy niggles, such as backache and pelvic girdle pain, constipation and fatigue, at bay.

Feel better about the changes that are happening to your pregnant body.

Maintain a healthy weight, although fluid can attribute to weight gain so perhaps don’t weigh yourself too much, go off how your feeling and looking.

Get a better night’s sleep.

Help to reduce or prevent depression again both during and after birth and also can improve your self-esteem.

Prepare your body and mind for the demands of labour and birth, as mentioned I felt like I’d ran a marathon!

Get back into shape after your baby is born. It’s amazing how the muscles remember what it’s like to feel good and by doing simple exercise during pregnancy you will recover at a quicker pace.

If you develop diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes), exercise can also help you to manage your blood sugar levels.

So now I hear you asking, what exercise do I recommend? Well I find that the best exercise isn’t strenuous but will get your heart pumping without being breathless, doesn’t cause soreness the next day, won’t have you feeling exhausted but helps with preparing your body for labour and what’s next.

I recommend exercises such as Low impact walking, swimming, aqua natal / aqua aerobics classes and cycling on a stationary exercise bike, are all good and safe forms of exercise, as long as you don’t push yourself. Never leave yourself breathless or struggling.

Pregnancy yoga and Pilates are good for strengthening and toning, though you should find a registered, qualified teacher who is experienced in teaching pregnant women.

Also try to vary the type of exercise you do. Mix it up with aerobic exercise, such as swimming or walking, and strength and conditioning exercise, such as yoga or Pilates, is ideal. Aim for a total of at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity, most, if not all, days of the week. Doing three, 10-minute sessions in a day is just as good as one 30-minute session, if that fits into your lifestyle better.

Remember that exercise doesn’t have to be formal to have an effect. Any activity that you can fit into your everyday life, such as walking to the shops, taking the stairs instead if the lift / elevator and doing housework also counts.

Just remember, pregnancy is tough on your body so don’t push yourself and if you feel fatigued or short of breath please seek medical advice.

Inexpensive games for babies & toddlers!

Fun inexpensive games for babies and toddlers.

Baby Games Idea #1: Peekaboo

Peekaboo is an easy and inexpensive game that will provide hours of fun for your baby. With younger babies, try hiding your face behind your hands, that way they she still knows you’re there. You can use fabrics and materials to cover your face too. In time, your baby will learn to pull back the fabric to find you. As they get older and begin to understand object permanence, you’ll be able to leave the room and jump back in shouting “Peekaboo!”. Funny faces and voices add extra layers of enjoyment to this game. My little guy loves this and plays it around corners in our home and out in the garden hiding behind plants etc. it’s a great game for all ages.
Baby Games Idea #2: Where Has Toy Gone?

This game can be played with any toy, it doesn’t have to be big nor small, perhaps your little ones favorite toy. Take the toy and display it for your baby, then take some material and cover up the toy. Then try and find it again. This game teaches your baby about object permanence. As your baby grows older, they will begin to understand that objects still exist, even if she can’t see them. When they have worked this out, they will start to pull back the material to find the missing toy. They may even hide the toy for you to find too.

Baby Games Idea #3: Sensory Time

This game can be altered and repeated as many times as you like. All you need is a muffin baking tray, and a handful of objects to put in it. Be careful not to choose anything small that could be a choking hazard. You don’t need to buy any fancy objects for this game, just everyday items from around your house will do. Empty toilet rolls, dried pasta, frozen peas, large beads, leaves from the garden, washing up sponges, ping pong balls and plastic spoons would all make great items for this game. Simply divide your chosen items amongst the muffin tray, and let your baby explore. Your baby will enjoy mouthing, touching and moving the items about.

This is all about taste, sight, touch and smell. They will also learn about putting things inside other things and size difference etc.

Baby Games Idea #4: Splash Time

This game is suitable once your baby can sit up unaided, or you can play it earlier with the assistance of a bath seat. Firstly you need to set up a splash pool. I have one of those half shell pools from bunnings. Make sure the water is the correct temperature for your baby. You don’t want it too cold not too hot. This Gould also be a great game for a warm day. Provide a selection of pouring containers and water toys. You may have some bath toys already, or you could use empty plastic containers and bottles. Teach your baby how to fill and empty the containers, how to splash and how to enjoy the water. Make sure the water stays warm so that your baby doesn’t end up miserable because the water has turned cold. If using a paddling pool, make sure your little one is adequately protected from the sun (preferably by being shaded).

Baby Games Idea #5: Feel This

This game is great for younger babies, and can be adapted for older babies who might like to hold the objects themselves. Babies love exploring new things, and this game focuses on their sense of touch. You’ll need a selection of different textures for them to feel. Feathers, silk scarves, sponge and bubble wrap are all suitable suggestions. For younger babies, gently drag the fabrics across her body and talk to her about what you’re doing. Explain that things feel soft or squishy, so she can start to understand the meaning of different words. For an older baby, explore the objects yourself and let your little one copy. We started this at gymbaroo and although my little guy is almost 2 he still loves exploring new feelings.

Ovarian cysts!

Ovarian cysts

My husband and I have been trying for a new baby. Very exciting news. I’ve always wanted 2 children and having a gorgeous little boy who is my world and whom I totally adore has been the best gift ever to me.

As most know, I had various issues with falling pregnant with my little guy and since trying for another I’m experiencing similar issues.

A few weeks ago I went in clomid to assist with ovulating. No luck 🙁 I went to have a blood test to just make sure things are ok.

Unfortunately they are not. I have high levels of testosterone and am not ovulating. I was then sent for an ultrasound. This came back with more horrible news. I have am ovarian cyst the size of an egg on my right ovary. Along with the continual blows, I inly have 14 follicles on my left Fallopian tube and 7 on my right. Most women have hundreds.

So here we go again with fertility issues.

Since finding out all this information I’ve been doing research on both ovarian cysts and follicles. Below is what I’ve found.
Ovarian Cysts and Tumors

The ovaries are two small organs located on either side of the uterus in a woman’s body. They make hormones, including estrogen, which trigger menstruation. Every month, the ovaries release a tiny egg. The egg makes its way down the fallopian tube to potentially be fertilized. This cycle of egg release is called ovulation.

What causes ovarian cysts?
Cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can form in the ovaries. They are very common. They are particularly common during the childbearing years.

There are several different types of ovarian cysts. The most common is a functional cyst. It forms during ovulation. That formation happens when either the egg is not released or the sac — follicle — in which the egg forms does not dissolve after the egg is released.

Nearly 60 Percent of Uterine Cancer Cases Preventable: Report
Other types of cysts include:

Polycystic ovaries. In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the follicles in which the eggs normally mature fail to open and cysts form.

Endometriomas. In women with endometriosis, tissue from the lining of the uterus grows in other areas of the body. This includes the ovaries. It can be very painful and can affect fertility.
Cystadenomas. These cysts form out of cells on the surface of the ovary. They are often fluid-filled.

Dermoid cysts. This type of cyst contains tissue similar to that in other parts of the body. That includes skin, hair, and teeth.

What causes ovarian tumors?
Tumors can form in the ovaries, just as they form in other parts of the body. If tumors are non-cancerous, they are said to be benign. If they are cancerous, they are called malignant. The three types of ovarian tumors are:

Epithelial cell tumors start from the cells on the surface of the ovaries. These are the most common type of ovarian tumors.

Germ cell tumors start in the cells that produce the eggs. They can either be benign or cancerous. Most are benign.
Stromal tumors originate in the cells that produce female hormones.
Doctors aren’t sure what causes ovarian cancer. They have identified, though, several risk factors, including:

Age — specifically women who have gone through menopause
Smoking
Obesity
Not having children or not breastfeeding (however, using birth control pills seems to lower the risk)
Taking fertility drugs (such as Clomid)
Hormone replacement therapy
Family or personal history of ovarian, breast, or colorectal cancer (having the BRCA gene can increase the risk)

What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts and tumors?

Often, ovarian cysts don’t cause any symptoms. You may not realize you have one until you visit your health care provider for a routine pelvic exam. Ovarian cysts can, however, cause problems if they twist, bleed, or rupture.

If you have any of the symptoms below, it’s important to have them checked out. That’s because they can also be symptoms of ovarian tumors. Ovarian cancer often spreads before it is detected.

Symptoms of ovarian cysts and tumors include:

Pain or bloating in the abdomen
Difficulty urinating, or frequent need to urinate
Dull ache in the lower back
Pain during sexual intercourse
Painful menstruation and abnormal bleeding
Weight gain
Nausea or vomiting
Loss of appetite, feeling full quickly
How do doctors diagnose ovarian cysts and tumors?

The obstetrician/gynecologist or your regular doctor may feel a lump while doing a routine pelvic exam. Most ovarian growths are benign. But a small number can be cancerous. That’s why it’s important to have any growths checked. Postmenopausal women in particular should get examined. That’s because they face a higher risk of ovarian cancer.

How do doctors diagnose ovarian cysts and tumors? continued…
Tests that look for ovarian cysts or tumors include:

Ultrasound. This test uses sound waves to create an image of the ovaries. The image helps the doctor determine the size and location of the cyst or tumor.

Other imaging tests. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) are highly detailed imaging scans. The doctor can use them to find ovarian tumors and see whether and how far they have spread.

Hormone levels. The doctor may take a blood test to check levels of several hormones. These include luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol, and testosterone.

Laparoscopy. This is a surgical procedure used to treat ovarian cysts. It uses a thin, light-tipped device inserted into your abdomen. During this surgery, the surgeon can find cysts or tumors and may remove a small piece of tissue (biopsy) to test for cancer.
CA-125. If the doctor thinks the growth may be cancerous, he might take a blood test to look for a protein called CA-125. Levels of this protein tend to be higher in some — but not all — women with ovarian cancer. This test is mainly used in women over age 35, who are at slightly higher risk for ovarian cancer.

If the diagnosis is ovarian cancer, the doctor will use the diagnostic test results to determine whether the cancer has spread outside of the ovaries. If it has, the doctor will also use the results to determine how far it has spread. This diagnostic procedure is called staging. This helps the doctor plan your treatment.

How are ovarian cysts and tumors treated?

Most ovarian cysts will go away on their own. If you don’t have any bothersome symptoms, especially if you haven’t yet gone through menopause, your doctor may advocate ”watchful waiting.” The doctor won’t treat you. But the doctor will check you every one to three months to see if there has been any change in the cyst.

Birth control pills may relieve the pain from ovarian cysts. They prevent ovulation, which reduces the odds that new cysts will form.

Surgery is an option if the cyst doesn’t go away, grows, or causes you pain. There are two types of surgery:

Laparoscopy uses a very small incision and a tiny, lighted telescope-like instrument. The instrument is inserted into the abdomen to remove the cyst. This technique works for smaller cysts.

Laparotomy involves a bigger incision in the stomach. Doctors prefer this technique for larger cysts and ovarian tumors. If the growth is cancerous, the surgeon will remove as much of the tumor as possible. This is called debulking. Depending on how far the cancer has spread, the surgeon may also remove the ovaries, uterus, fallopian tubes, omentum — fatty tissue covering the intestines — and nearby lymph nodes.

Other treatments for cancerous ovarian tumors include:

Chemotherapy — drugs given through a vein (IV), by mouth, or directly into the abdomen to kill cancer cells. Because they kill normal cells as well as cancerous ones, chemotherapy medications can have side effects, including nausea and vomiting, hair loss, kidney damage, and increased risk of infection. These side effects should go away after the treatment is done.

Radiation — high-energy X-rays that kill or shrink cancer cells. Radiation is either delivered from outside the body, or placed inside the body near the site of the tumor. This treatment also can cause side effects, including red skin, nausea, diarrhea, and fatigue. Radiation is not often used for ovarian cancer.

Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation may be given individually or together. It is possible for cancerous ovarian tumors to return. If that happens, you will need to have more surgery, sometimes combined with chemotherapy or radiation.

The ovaries contain eggs (which formed in the ovary during childhood) and these are matured by the ovary (usually one at a time) in follicles which then come to the surface of the ovary and burst to release the egg into the top of the fallopian tube.

Thus if multiple follicles have been detected in an ovary, that ovary is developing more than one egg at a time – this can result non identical twins.

Usually only one follicle is developed to maturity at a time but it is possible to stimulate the ovary to produce more (using hormones) as part of interventions relating to infertility treatments.

Antral follicles are small follicles (about 2-8 mm in diameter) that we can see – and measure and count – with ultrasound. Antral follicles are also referred to as resting follicles. Vaginal ultrasound is the best way to accurately assess and count these small structures.

Many fertility specialists believe that the antral follicle counts (in conjunction with female age) are the best tool that we currently have for estimating a woman’s remaining fertility potential (or ovarian reserve). Ovarian volume measurements (also done by ultrasound), and day 3 FSH and AMH levels (blood tests) are additional studies that can help.

Presumably, the number of antral follicles visible on ultrasound is indicative of the relative number of microscopic (and sound asleep) primordial follicles remaining in the ovary. Each primordial follicle contains an immature egg that can potentially develop in the future.

In other words, when there are only a few antral follicles visible, there are far less eggs remaining as compared to when there are many more antral follicles visible. As women age, they have less eggs (primordial follicles) remaining – and they have less antral follicles visible on ultrasound. Therefor lower chances of falling pregnant.

 

Dealing with a fussy toddler.

So my 17 month old little man has just decided that everything I put in front of him is ‘yuk’ – his words not mine. I’ve tried many recipes that I think he would like but unless he is feeding himself, and let’s face it, messy and takes double the time. It’s all a little bit frustrating. For us both.

I’ve signed up for many newsletters that help with such toddler issues.

A great one that I recently receivEd was from Baby Bliss.

This website has sooo much helpful information on EVERYTHING to do with being a mummy.

The most recent article that I have read from Baby Bliss I’ve pasted below. I hope it’s as informative for you as it has been for me.

Toddlers: Eating, sleeping and Dealing with the NOs

by  on April 15, 2014 in Parenting SeminarsSiblingsToddlers
By nature toddlers are inquisitive, active and designed to push back. They are exploring their world and this can be exciting and frightening to them. We need to support and guide them through this time with effective methods of setting boundaries and discipline while allowing them to develop a sense of themselves.Sleeping

Toddlers can become tricky at bedtime as they can have some increased separation anxiety. They may ask for you to stay with them when falling asleep and then when they wake overnight. Things you can do to change this (if you want to!):

  • Ensure you have a ritual around bedtime
  • Toddlers need lots of good deep sleep so they need to be asleep by 7/7.30pm at the latest.
  • Rather than sit with them till they are asleep go in and out reassuring them that you will be back.
  • Use a night light.
  • Give your toddler a comforter and include that in the bedtime ritual.
  • Use a clock for those toddlers who rise early.
  • Use a reward chart (for 3 year olds and above) to change behaviour but you must be consistent with it.

Eating

Meal times can become a battle ground with toddlers as they start to decide what they do and don’t like. Try not to fight or turn it into a huge production. Remember toddlers are on the go, go, go all the time and so they can eat on the run. They also can eat non-stop one day and then nothing the next. That is normal. Trust that they will know what they need.

  • Keep mealtimes to 30 minutes
  • Don’t offer too much choice as your child will be confused.
  • Ensure they know that this is all there is once the meal is served.
  • Don’t make dessert a reward; it should just be part of the meal.
  • Vegetables should be on the plate every day.
  • Ask that they taste new foods, just once.
  • Try and make mealtimes before your child gets too tired.

Managing Toddler Behaviour

Toddlers can be tricky. It can be the age of tantrums and telling you, “NO!” Try not to take this behaviour personally – you child is discovering themselves as little individuals and testing out ways of being independent from you.

A few little tips can help you navigate through this phase but remember it is okay to say NO to them and it is okay for them to not like you, for that moment!

  • Always use positive language when you’re asking them not to do something this puts the focus on what you DO want them to do and takes the focus off the thing that you don’t want them to do.
  • ‘No’ is an overused word that doesn’t give the child much information. It’s better to tell them what you do want to do, or if there is immediate danger, a better word is “stop” because it gives them information about what you want them to do.
  • Always speak calmly to your child when correcting them or asking them to do something. This shows them you are in-charge and confidant.
  • Try not to lecture – you child will switch-off after the first minute. Be matter-of-fact: “I won’t let you do that. If you throw that again I will take it away”
  • Natural consequences: A toddler learns discipline best when he experiences natural consequences for his behaviour, rather than a disconnected punishment like time-out. If a child throws food, mealtime is over. If a child refuses to get dressed, we don’t go to the park today. These parental responses appeal to your child’s sense of fairness.
  • Personally, I think that smacking is counterproductive because it teaches children that hitting is ok, particularly if you’re angry, and that if you’re bigger and stronger, then you can use force to solve a problem. At the end of the day, we want our kids to use alternative strategies when they have a problem and so we need to model this for them.

 Your children will become who you are, so be who you want them to be.

for other articles like this head to www.babybliss.com.au

Super for women = super woman

Super for women = super women!

So we all know that when a woman stops working for an employer they no longer have paid superannuation right? So when we retire – which we never actually do as we are always still working around the house or looking after children and our loved ones it’s still working, however not paid with money. What do we use as our nest egg?

So many articles of late have bought up this very topic and so I thought I’d share a few tips that I have been doing to help me upon retirement.

1. Put a little away each week into your super account. I don’t earn a lot so can’t really afford to put much away however even though my employer puts my superannuation into my account quarterly, each week I have $20 of my own money go into the same super account. It isn’t much but when I retire it will all add up, every little bit helps!

2. Commissions – again when I make commissions (I work in a sales role) I transfer these into my superannuation account.

3. Gifts – if you are given money – sometimes my family give me birthday money and although it’s rally toying to go buy that dress that you love and think you need – perhaps use the money towards your superannuation. Or if you can’t bear to not spoilt yourself a little – let’s face if we all love gifts and new things 🙂 maybe put $20 in the super and use the rest to get yourself a little something.

4. Sell your unwanted items – perhaps you have a wardrobe of clothes that you just can’t fit into or they are no longer your style? Or maybe you have baby things that are no longer of use? Sell them! I know the thought of selling your belongings can seem overwhelming, but I promise you it’s not hard.

There are so many different selling options out there. Garage sale, eBay, gumtree, local markets and boot sales. All these unwanted items – turn them into cash. Then bank it! Put it in your superannuation.

We all know superannuation accounts are different. Mine is a good one with small annual fees and quite safe – how I like it. I like the thought of paying minimal but still making a return. It may not be a huge fast return but hey – I’m only 33 and not ready to retire yet!

Find the right super find that suits your needs and remember, adding a little extra now will only benefit you in the long term! Happy retirement!