Tag Archives: 2

My life as a mummy of two!

My life as a mummy of two!

So settling into being a mummy of two has been challenging. Loving it, but challenging.

Experiencing the love all over again, smelling and absorbing my new born and still being everything I can be for my 2 year old.

My 2 year old has been a little jealous and understandably. He has had his mummy all to himself for the past 2.5years, now all of a sudden he has to share his mummy and it hasn’t been an easy adjustment for him.

Throughout my pregnancy I was trying to help him adjust, I bought books about becoming a big brother, books about expecting a baby and we would chat about how he is getting a little sister and that it’s very special for both him and her.

I thought he would be a little jealous but I guess I wasn’t prepared for the huge change in him.

Firstly my little man used to be a fairly good sleeper. After night nurses and reward charts I had managed to get him to go down approx 6pm in his own bed, we would read 3 books then it was lights off. My little man would then sleep through in his own big boy bed until approx 6am the next morning.

Since I was in hospital for over a week my husband and mother were looking after my little man. His routine wasn’t really followed and for a few weeks he didn’t like to go to bed and wasn’t sleeping through, waking multiple times per night and insisting on sleeping with me and leaving his bedside lamp on.

The first few nights I was really strict and walked him back to his room, comforted him and helped him to go back to sleep but after 5 nights of the same behaviour I began to feel bad and allowed him to come into my bed and sleep with me.

Mainly because it’s a huge adjustment and in between feeding my little girl every 2.5 hours I have been pretty tired. Also secretly I love snuggling with him and he is my little man, my first born and always will be.

This phase only lasted approx 3 weeks though and now he is happy to go to his own bed, he isn’t sleeping through every night, however most nights he does, and if he doesn’t he is only waking once or twice and I carry him back to his room and he goes back to sleep.

He is really sweet with his sister and is quite protective and loving towards her. If he hears her cry he will come straight to me and tell me she is upset and he also runs to her room and says in the sweetest little voice ‘you ok Mila?’

He also loves to help me change her nappy and I allow him to choose her outfits. I want him to feel involved and part of her life. Although he is only 2.5years old I think that by allowing him to be a big part in the decisions around her will help him to adjust and accept her more easily and not have him be as jealous or feel left out or pushed aside.

My little girl though is a different story, she sleeps very well and I actually wake her to feed. During the day I’m feeding every 3 hours however of a night I let her sleep and she wakes me. She is only 3 weeks old though and I anticipate that this may change.

The dynamic in the house has also changed, it feels complete now. I feel like I’m whole. My little man and my little princess have completed me, of course with my husband. 🙂 I was once told that to have one child of each sex is a ‘gentleman’s family’ or a ‘pigeon pair’ which is apparently quite well looked upon in the eyes of some. I feel blessed that I have been able to create this little family with my husband and also be able to give him a child of each sex.

Being a parent is a constant lesson, I’m always learning more about myself but also about my children. I’m feeling very blessed at this stage in my life.

I’m sure with each step and change in growth patterns with my 2 children things within our home will change also with dynamics and learning. I look forward to sharing these moments with you.

Swapping designer bags for nappy bags!

When we swap designer handbags for nappy bags.

I’m not sure about you but I don’t use a ‘nappy bag’ I simply throw all my toddler needs into my oversized handbag.

I know it’s possibly not practical and ideal – but it works for me. At this sat age, however I am expecting number 2 in 16 weeks so perhaps I will change my mind?

I didn’t have so many things in my handbag that I meant I needed the oversize nappy bag, plus I didn’t really want to use a nappy bag and let’s face it, how many nappy bags out there are ‘sexy/nice/attractive’ to look at?

I get that they were made for a purpose and have many different compartments for all your baby or toddler needs, but I find them so bulky and big and generally unattractive.

Yes I know – they are not always designed for fashion but it would be nice to have something that doesn’t feel like an overnight bag or swag right? Oh and don’t forget the hefty cost as most mothers feel they ‘need’ to use a nappy bag just because they have children. They have their target market!

I’m yet to find one that I like that suits my needs and is user friendly, not with multiple compartments so that you forget which pocket had the wipes and which one has your keys! I’m also not into rummaging around trying to find different things.

I don’t do the overkill with my bag either, it’s usually a daily throw into my handbag for when we are out and about. My handbag has a few pockets where I can slip my keys for easy access and also a mobile phone pocket so I know where everything is at any stage.

My handbag now consists of:

My belongings.
– Wallet
– Mobile phone
– Keys
– sunglasses
– Small pencil case with band aids, lip balm, panadol, pen, nail file,

My toddlers belongings.
– 2 x nappies in a medium sized pencil case for hygiene reasons
– small packet of nappy wipes
– small roll on sunscreen SPF 50
– hat
– drink bottle of water
– a small car or toy of some sort
– 2 x nappy disposal bags
– small lunch box of toddler snacks

So why carry the extra large nappy bag? All this stuff fits in my handbag and isn’t too heavy. It also means I’m not carrying a big full bag and feel like I’m almost going on a road trip!

What are your experiences?

Do you use a nappy bag?

Have you found one that you love?

Do you find them useful or do you simply make do with your handbag like me?

Email me – noordinarymummy@gmail.com

2014

Reflecting 2014.

What a year!

An exciting yet busy year it was for me.

Where to start?

Hubby and I bought a house and did some minor renovations prior to moving in, I left my amazing corporate role to become a full time mummy, my mother had 2 heart attacks, we fell pregnant (planned) with bub number 2, my little guy turned 2 and let’s not forget I started this blog in February.

I met some amazing new friends, friends that I know will be life long. They are such wonderful women whom i admire and respect and although I’ve only known them since May – since our move, I know I can trust them with anything and rely on them for forever more.

Our children are of similar age and play well together and these people are wholesome and full of happiness and love.

Ive rekindled some lovely friendships that Id made back in either high school or my early 20’s – again with people I know are genuine and I can trust.

I think that as we get older we are more particular with whom we will and won’t share our lives with, this may be a maturity thing or it could be that we are more cautious. Either way, I know the people in my life now are my true friends with no ‘crap’ involved. Excuse the language. I’m grateful that they have re entered my life and our friendships are growing again.

Again these special people are wholesome and the type of people whom I know I can trust and rely on in whatever situation.

So in 2015 Im sure there will be many more exciting things happen which I’m looking forward to sharing with you including the birth of my 2nd bub due in May.

Stay tuned and I hope to hear your stories in 2015 also!

Inexpensive games for babies & toddlers!

Fun inexpensive games for babies and toddlers.

Baby Games Idea #1: Peekaboo

Peekaboo is an easy and inexpensive game that will provide hours of fun for your baby. With younger babies, try hiding your face behind your hands, that way they she still knows you’re there. You can use fabrics and materials to cover your face too. In time, your baby will learn to pull back the fabric to find you. As they get older and begin to understand object permanence, you’ll be able to leave the room and jump back in shouting “Peekaboo!”. Funny faces and voices add extra layers of enjoyment to this game. My little guy loves this and plays it around corners in our home and out in the garden hiding behind plants etc. it’s a great game for all ages.
Baby Games Idea #2: Where Has Toy Gone?

This game can be played with any toy, it doesn’t have to be big nor small, perhaps your little ones favorite toy. Take the toy and display it for your baby, then take some material and cover up the toy. Then try and find it again. This game teaches your baby about object permanence. As your baby grows older, they will begin to understand that objects still exist, even if she can’t see them. When they have worked this out, they will start to pull back the material to find the missing toy. They may even hide the toy for you to find too.

Baby Games Idea #3: Sensory Time

This game can be altered and repeated as many times as you like. All you need is a muffin baking tray, and a handful of objects to put in it. Be careful not to choose anything small that could be a choking hazard. You don’t need to buy any fancy objects for this game, just everyday items from around your house will do. Empty toilet rolls, dried pasta, frozen peas, large beads, leaves from the garden, washing up sponges, ping pong balls and plastic spoons would all make great items for this game. Simply divide your chosen items amongst the muffin tray, and let your baby explore. Your baby will enjoy mouthing, touching and moving the items about.

This is all about taste, sight, touch and smell. They will also learn about putting things inside other things and size difference etc.

Baby Games Idea #4: Splash Time

This game is suitable once your baby can sit up unaided, or you can play it earlier with the assistance of a bath seat. Firstly you need to set up a splash pool. I have one of those half shell pools from bunnings. Make sure the water is the correct temperature for your baby. You don’t want it too cold not too hot. This Gould also be a great game for a warm day. Provide a selection of pouring containers and water toys. You may have some bath toys already, or you could use empty plastic containers and bottles. Teach your baby how to fill and empty the containers, how to splash and how to enjoy the water. Make sure the water stays warm so that your baby doesn’t end up miserable because the water has turned cold. If using a paddling pool, make sure your little one is adequately protected from the sun (preferably by being shaded).

Baby Games Idea #5: Feel This

This game is great for younger babies, and can be adapted for older babies who might like to hold the objects themselves. Babies love exploring new things, and this game focuses on their sense of touch. You’ll need a selection of different textures for them to feel. Feathers, silk scarves, sponge and bubble wrap are all suitable suggestions. For younger babies, gently drag the fabrics across her body and talk to her about what you’re doing. Explain that things feel soft or squishy, so she can start to understand the meaning of different words. For an older baby, explore the objects yourself and let your little one copy. We started this at gymbaroo and although my little guy is almost 2 he still loves exploring new feelings.

Jamie Oliver inspired fried rice.

Jamie Oliver inspired fried rice.

So I was watching a Jamie Oliver cooking show last night on how he try’s to minimise his food waste, and how thousands of dollars worth of food is water each year due to it simply going off prior to being eaten or used.

One of the recipes he made was a fried rice. It looked super easy and super delicious!

We all now how I like eating healthy, clean, easy, yummy food so I decided to make my twist on his recipe.

Ingredients
1 x family size packet uncle bens brown rice – cool in microwave for 90 seconds
1 x teaspoon garlic paste
1 x tablespoon chilli paste
1/4 x cup hot chilli sauce
2 x eggs
1 x small tin corn kernels
1 x bunch rocket – Finely sliced
1 x 100gm hot salami sliced
1 x 100gm roast pork

I used sandwich sliced roast pork and salami, pre packed from the supermarket. I always have sandwich meat in the fridge. You can always use ham, beef, chicken whatever you prefer. Jamie Oliver used left over roast beef.

In a large non stick fry pan heat the garlic, chilli and rice storing until all combined.

Add the corn followed by the meats.

Once all combined add the hot chilli sauce, then 1 egg making sure the raw egg is evening dispersed and cooked.

Add the rocket combine and press down firm so that the rice will crisp against the fry pan bottom and edges. Again Jamie used cabbage rather than rocket. I had no cabbage so used rocket instead.

With a spoon make a small well in the centre of the fried rice and crack the 2nd egg into the well.

Put the lid on and turn the heat off and let sit for at minimal 30 minutes.

These flavours enhance overtime and by leaving it sit with a lid on, the 2nd egg will cool from the existing heat.

This will last up to a week in an airtight container in the fridge.

I serve with grilled haloumi…! Yumo!

Remember as with most of my recipes, you can add as little or as much spice and flavour as you like! I like a lot of bite in my chilli – this recipe is only mild, I generally add 1/2 cup of extra hot chilli sauce.

Parenting whilst distracted.

Parenting whilst distracted.

I’ve previously written an article on a similar subject but I feel very strongly about it and recently read a very informative article by an extremely reputable paediatric specialist. This was also on SBS recently so I felt I needed to share this information from someone who does know what they are talking about.

Their words are easy to understand and this makes absolute sense to me.

I’m not saying there is no place for technology, we live in a very technologically advanced world, however what I am saying, is that there is a time and place for it.

Our children are only young once. Enjoy the time.

Have a read and let me know your thoughts.

Parenting while distracted.
I’ve been a pediatrician for 20 years, and I thought I’d seen it all. But not long ago, when a father brought his 2-year-old into my clinic, something happened that has me deeply concerned.
Written By Jane Scott
Source The Washington Post
11 AUG 2014 –

I’ve been a pediatrician for 20 years, and I thought I’d seen it all. But not long ago, when a father brought his 2-year-old into my clinic, something happened that has me deeply concerned.

Upon entering my examining room, I found father and son sitting together, eyes downcast, each silently scrolling and tapping on smartphones. During my initial exam, the father directed most of my questions to his frowning toddler, who indicated that his ears hurt, and I quickly discovered that both eardrums were red and inflamed.

“Guess what?” I said to my small patient. “Your ears hurt because you have an ear infection. But we can give you medicine and make you better.” I smiled at the little boy and his father. Immediately, the child picked up his phone and pushed a button. “Siri,” he asked carefully. “What ear ‘fection?”

At age 2, a few minutes on a smartphone isn’t a big deal; screen time is a part of growing up today, and most parents try to set appropriate limits. But when a child so young turned to a machine for information instead of to his father, it made me wonder: Just how limited was his parents’ screen time? What I saw was modeled behavior — a child who has learned that when he has a question, Siri, and not Dad, is most readily available with an answer.

It’s hard to say for sure based on this one moment, but there can be no doubt about the larger trend: Parents today are probably the most informed and involved generation in history. And, yet, in the company of their children, they often act as though they’d rather be someplace else. That’s what they’re saying when they break eye contact to glance at their push notifications or check Facebook when they think their child’s distracted. The parents are present, their attention is not.

In my practice, I see evidence every day of how such inattention affects kids. It’s expressed in temper tantrums and separation anxiety, and older children who resist discipline. Most parents are taught that this is all normal, that children are biologically wired this way. Not exactly. Yes, all of this is normal attention-getting behavior, but it often is preventable.

Consider the results of a March study by researchers from Boston Medical Center who carefully observed caregivers and children at fast-food restaurants. Out of 55 caregivers, 40 used their mobile devices, and their absorption was such that their “primary engagement was with the device, rather than the child.” In many cases, the caregivers expressed irritation when the children tried to get their attention. One observer watched a woman push a small boy away as he took her face in his hands in an attempt to get her to look up from her tablet.

It’s possible all those adults were following an urgent work email thread. More likely, they were on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest. A 2011 Nielsen poll found that people with children use social media more than those without. Maybe these adults were reading an article shared by another parent. Maybe they were making plans with friends and family. But they were definitely communicating to their children that they were less important than whatever was on those devices.

This might seem absurd to today’s parents, who feel like they give themselves to their children in ways previous generations never imagined. But the undivided attention that children need from us is in jeopardy. Most people just don’t realize how much time they’re spending online; what feels like a few minutes is often a half hour or more. When we are with our children, we need to be with our children — not with them except for the part of us that’s reading emails, tweeting and checking Facebook.

Another reason for parents to put down their phones: Though Facebook may provide community, it can also promote competition and unreachable standards of perfection. Through Facebook, we read an endless litany of our friends’ boasts about their children. It’s enough to make a person wonder what she’s doing wrong because her child prefers plain pasta over the curry special or “Old MacDonald” to Chopin. Though most parents would say they’re not competitive in this way, many worry privately that they might be short-changing their kids.

Social media has a place and a purpose, but too many parents are creating unnecessary stress by trying to be in two places at once, while modeling to their children that online relationships take precedence over real ones. In an era of constant distraction, we must decide what’s more important: heeding the constant ping of our devices or telling our children, in word and deed, “I am listening. I am here. And there’s nowhere else I’d rather be.”

Heart attack, it’s a big deal.

Heart attack, it’s a big deal.

So 2 weeks ago my mum had not 1 but 2 heart attacks. My mum is a nurse and works very hard in a hospital over an hours drive from the small town where she lives. She had arrived at work early on the Friday morning complaining if chest pains and shortness of breath, one if her colleagues insisted on taking her pulse – which was racing. Her colleague also insisted on an ECG straight away only to find out my mother had suffered a minor heart attack.

She has been suffering sharp chest pains for a few months but thought nothing of them, passing them off as indigestion. Turns out she was wrong.

I found out that my mother had a heart attack at approx 4pm that afternoon after she had it at 7am. The hospital had informed her husband who failed to contact anyone else to raise the awareness. Needless to say I was fuming. This is my mother, this is her health and this is very important.

The way I found out is not ideal, I was on a play date with a friend and our two boys and received a calm from my older sister asking if I had heard from mum. My reply was no as I hadn’t. I asked her why? He response that she received a weird text from her but had tried calling mums mobile only to have it ring out or go to voice mail. She was taking her 3 children to the dentist and asked me to keep trying.

I decided to call the hospital where our mother works. To my shock I was transferred to the emergency department where a nurse informed me that she had was unable to talk as she had a heart attack and they were running tests to work out why.

I called my sister to inform her and she rushed to the hospital which is 1.5hrs away ASAP.

The hospital staff were concerned after running tests so sent her via patient transport to a larger hospital the next day. I of course travelled to that hospital on the Sunday morning with my toddler for a visit. I received a call from my sister earlier that morning saying she had another heart attack earlier that morning.

My mum is young 54 to be exact, how can this happen to her? Why has this happened to her?

After many tests, cardiac ablation )which required nodes to be removed from her heart) and an angiogram it turns out the heart attacks were caused by a condition called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Which basically means the sufferer has emotional stress. It’s also called ‘octopus heart’ or ‘broken heart syndrome’.

Now before the shock set in I was thinking, mode removed? Why? Doesn’t she need those?

Nodes in the heart are what basically pumps the heart, nodes create the electrical conduction for the heart to pump. Normal electrical conduction in the heart allows impulses that are generated by the sinoatrial node (SA node) of the heart to be propagated (stimulate) the cardiac muscle (myocardium). The myocardium contracts after it’s stimulated. It is the stimulation of the myocardium that allows contraction of the heart, allowing blood to be pumped throughout the rat of our body’s.

My mum herself is a highly trained nurse and has been for many years, yes she has a stressful life but to hear this diagnosis is a little shocking.

I won’t go into her personal life details but there are many confirmed reasons as to why she is suffering ‘Broken Heart Syndrome’. Now it’s up to her and our family to try and eliminate these stresses to ensure that she is around with us for many years to come.

After much research into this I’ve found the descriptions below from a Harvard Health publication.

It’s named after an octopus trap — and that’s not all that’s unusual about this reversible heart condition. It occurs almost exclusively in women.

Years of gender-based research have shown that in matters of the heart, sex differences abound. One striking example is the temporary heart condition known as takotsubo cardiomyopathy, first described in 1990 in Japan. More than 90% of reported cases are in women ages 58 to 75. Research suggests that at least 6% of women evaluated for a heart attack actually have this disorder, which has only recently been reported in the United States and may go largely unrecognized. Fortunately, most people recover rapidly with no long-term heart damage.
Features of takotsubo cardiomyopathy

Chest pain and shortness of breath after severe stress (emotional or physical)

Electrocardiogram abnormalities that mimic those of a heart attack

No evidence of coronary artery obstruction

Movement abnormalities in the left ventricle

Ballooning of the left ventricle

Recovery within a month
What is it?

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a weakening of the left ventricle, the heart’s main pumping chamber, usually as the result of severe emotional or physical stress, such as a sudden illness, the loss of a loved one, a serious accident, or a natural disaster such as an earthquake. (For additional examples, see “Stressors associated with takotsubo cardiomyopathy.”) That’s why the condition is also called stress-induced cardiomyopathy, or broken-heart syndrome. The main symptoms are chest pain and shortness of breath.
Stressors associated with takotsubo cardiomyopathy*

Sudden drop in blood pressure

Serious illness, surgery, or medical procedure (e.g., cardiac stress test)

Severe pain

Domestic violence

Asthma attack

Receiving bad news (such as a diagnosis of cancer)

Car or other accident

Unexpected loss, illness, or injury of a close relative, friend, or pet

Fierce argument

Financial loss

Intense fear

Public speaking

A surprise party or other sudden surprise

The precise cause isn’t known, but experts think that surging stress hormones (for example, adrenaline) essentially “stun” the heart, triggering changes in heart muscle cells or coronary blood vessels (or both) that prevent the left ventricle from contracting effectively. Researchers suspect that older women are more vulnerable because of reduced levels of estrogen after menopause. In studies with rats whose ovaries had been removed, the ones given estrogen while under stress had less left-ventricle dysfunction and higher levels of certain heart-protective substances.

Takotsubo symptoms are indistinguishable from those of a heart attack. And an electrocardiogram (ECG) may show abnormalities also found in some heart attacks — in particular, changes known as ST-segment elevation. Consequently, imaging studies and other measures are needed to rule out a heart attack. To get a definitive diagnosis, clinicians look for the following:

No evidence on an angiogram of blockages in the coronary arteries — the most common cause of heart attacks. (The coronary arteries are also not blocked in microvessel disease, a more common cause of heart attack symptoms in older women. Microvessel disease results from abnormal dilation of the blood vessels feeding the heart.)

A rapid but small rise in cardiac biomarkers (substances released into the blood when the heart is damaged). In a heart attack, cardiac biomarkers take longer to rise but peak higher.

Evidence from an x-ray, echocardiogram (ultrasound image), or other imaging technique that there are abnormal movements in the walls of the left ventricle. The most common abnormality in takotsubo cardiomyopathy — the one that gives the disorder its name — is ballooning of the lower part of the left ventricle (apex). During contraction (systole), this bulging ventricle resembles a tako-tsubo, a pot used by Japanese fishermen to trap octopuses. Another term for the disorder is apical ballooning syndrome. (See “Apical ballooning and the tako-tsubo.”)

Heart attacks can be caused by many factors of our lives and can occur at any age or any fitness level.

If you are suffering any type of stress or tightness in your chest, please see your doctor. No life is worth losing.

Mia Freedman

26 beauty truths only mothers understand. (Or aunts)

I just read the best article from an extremely funny journalist. Mia Freedman. Mia is the brains and braun behind ‘MamaMia’ blog, website and much more.

I only have a toddler who happens to be a boy however  my sister has 3 beautiful children whom I am extremely close with so these ring true from them. My sisters kids are now 13, 11 and 8 with the 2 eldest being girls. ‘Tweens’ and ‘teenagers’ are always experimenting finding their own style and comfort zone with both clothes and make up.

I myself only wear make up on special occasions which is basically only ever mascara, eye liner and lippy and perhaps 3 time per year but this story made me smirk with happiness and automatically filled me with find memories.

 

Please read Mia’s story below.

Once the baby’s out, your beauty routine will never go back to the way it was.

Don’t like sharing your lipstick? Too late.

Your body is not the only thing that changes after you have a baby. Your beauty routine does too, because you’re never alone in your bathroom and you have no time.

Remember the days of luxuriating in the bath or cranking up the music while you spend a satisfying 25 minutes trying to perfect a make-up trick you saw in a magazine?

BAHAHAHAHAHHAAA.

How times change. Here are the beauty truths only mothers can understand.

1. Your bikini line is now something for public commentary. “My mummy has a hairy front bum” is something every child will announce, usually in a supermarket queue.

2. Having to answer these and 100 other questions while putting on makeup or doing your hair: “What actually happens when you die? What rocks are made of? Where do farts go when you can’t smell them anymore?”

3. Eye makeup remover is the best way to remove lipstick from all over your child’s face. Also from the carpet and the dog.

4. Red lipstick and black eyeliner are the best way to create realistic looking scars and wounds. Particularly useful at Halloween.

5. You no longer associate the word ‘bath’ with relaxation or peace. Instead, you associate it with 37 bath toys and an inevitable tantrum when it’s time to wash hair.

6. Doing your makeup takes twice as long because your children want to play with all the brushes / EVERYTHING YOU OWN.

7. Eyeshadow is a bitch to get out of tiles when someone drops it on the floor and it smashes into a thousand powdery pieces.

8. You will be judged when you take your 2-year-old to the nail salon, even though you just really needed to get a pedicure and that’s what iPads were invented for.

9. You will always have chipped nail polish and chipped nails. Always.

10. You embrace ‘natural’ makeup because you actually have no time for the routine you once had and who actually cares what you look like today?

11. You will be asked “what’s that on your face, mummy?” as curious fingers are pointed at your pimples, moles and freckles.

12. Your GHD is covered in inches of dust, and you can’t remember the last time you switched it on.

13. Cleansing your face with anything other than a facial wipe? Not going to happen.

14. You have to keep your makeup hidden at all times, because lipsticks, even really, really expensive ones, are crayons.

15. You become an expert at putting makeup on without a mirror in two minutes flat because LITTLE CHILDREN. (This explains a lot about how I look before my first office bathroom visit of the day).

16. You can’t blow-dry your hair properly because either a) your child hates the sound of the hairdryer and will wail the whole time it’s running or b) loves the sound of the hairdryer and just keeps insisting you turn it on them in a HILARIOUS game.

17. “Grooming” now means shaving your legs once a month. In winter, it’s once every three months.

18. Shapewear. Shapewear. Shapewear.

19. “Doing your hair” now means just spraying it with dry shampoo.

20. Conversations like this when you’re putting on makeup:

“But Mama WHY are you painting your face?”

“Because it makes me feel good.

“Why does it make you feel good?”

“Er… because it makes me feel nicer.”

“But why? it looks sticky. Can I put it on?”

“No, little boys don’t really wear makeup…”

“But why? I want to look like a vampire too.”

(oh.)

21. Finding your makeup brushes being used as paint brushes. And the paint is… (oh no) your eye shadow. And the canvas is (oh no)… the wall.

22. Explaining to your three year old that she is too pretty for makeup… and then putting in on yourself.

23. Answering the urgent question every single day: “No, your hair isn’t as long as Elsa’s yet… No, your hair isn’t as long as Elsa’s yet. No, your hair isn’t a long as Elsa’s yet…”

24. Acting nonchalant when your daughter tells you that she has put “nappies” on her “babies” – the nappies being an entire packet of pads!

25. When your daughter becomes a teenager, you must start hiding every beauty product you own because she nicks them. All. The. Time.

26. On the flipside, you get to start nicking hers when she starts buying cool stuff.

You can read Mia’s other stories at:

http://www.mamamia.com.au/author/mia/

http://www.mamamia.com.au

http://www.theglow.com.au/beauty/beauty-for-mothers-truths/?mm

Step children.

On my recent holiday to Fiji I met some lovely people. All different and from various countries but no the less similar.

It seems almost 1 in 3 family’s have step children. Given that the divorce rates here in Australia alone are high, statistics show that approx 48% of marriage ends in divorce.

This one woman I met was quite opinionated on her step child.

On day 4 of our holiday my toddler and I were swimming in one of the family friendly pools when she came with her 2 year old daughter to play with us. My little one had a dump truck, spade and rake in the pool which seemed to be a hit with other children.

So the usual conversation started, she asked me then I asked her the same questions,’how long have you been here, how long are you staying, is this your first Fiji trip, who are you with? Etc

Her response was she was with her husband, their two daughters and her husbands son.

Her husbands son I thought? She then elaborated that She and her husband had been together 13 years and they had 2 daughters together, a 5 year old and a 2 year old. The ‘husbands son’ was 19 and from his previous relationship. I didn’t divulge any deeper but she was more than happy to tell me all about the situation.

The husbands son seems to be the ‘favourite’ child, let’s face it when it comes to break ups, there is always pity on the ‘poor child’ who’s parents are no longer together.

She went on to tell me that she didn’t have much to do with him as he is bad mannered, disrespectful towards her, arrogant and expecting. He apparently ‘wants for nothing and receive’s all he asks for, she mentioned that they are certainly not wealthy but the father buys and does whatever the son asks. She also proceeded to tell me that he demands his fathers attention and because her husband doesn’t see the son too often as he lives with his mother he feels feels obliged to give him his undivided attention when he does see him. I asked how often does her husband see his son and she replied with ‘every second weekend’.

She said that she has no doubt that her hubby loves their two daughters but wishes he put as much effort into them as he does his 19 year old son. She said that when the son is around the daughters are often not included with the father and sons activities.

Quite sad really. I think that as the girls grow up they will see this behaviour and perhaps resent both the father and his son?

I asked her how it affects her marriage and she replied with ‘it’s great when the son isn’t around’. I guess I wasn’t surprised as there are many similar situations like this.

Which makes me wonder, do you have to like your step children?

This woman certainly gave me the impression that she doesn’t like her step son at all. She said a few other things which shocked me and I think that if I was in her position I wouldn’t like the husbands son either.

She says she tolerates her husbands son for his sake but cringes each time the son is over, as it generally means that she and her husband argue over his parenting style with the son and the lack of involvement he has with their daughters. She feels that her husband favours the son and has a sense of guilt which is why he allows the son to behave in such a disrespectful and arrogant manner.

I felt sorry for her, what a difficult situation.

I guess that her story is not the only one like this out there, there are so many split families around, however I guess it’s how you treat the situation as to how your next relationship / family will unfold.

She said it’s always been the same for the 13 years that they have been together but has gotten worse since they had their girls and she sometimes questions why she puts up with it.

I didn’t ask her but I am wondering ‘Do you think the father feels guilty that he has moved on and is happy with someone other than the sons mother which is why he feels obliged to put the son first and almost neglects his new family of wife and 2 girls when the son is around?’.

Savoury tasty pastry twists!

Savoury Pastry Twists!

These recipes are easily altered to suit your taste buds.

Simple yet yummy is what my kitchen is all about 🙂

Ingredients
1 x packet puff pastry
1 x jar vegemite
1 x 250gm bag grated cheese – can be low fat if you prefer
1 x jar pesto – whatever flavour you prefer
1 x 200gm packet diced bacon – or you can cut up your own flavour sandwich meat
2 x eggs

Method

Preheat your oven to 180 degrees.

Lay out your large squares of puff pastry on a clean bench using 2 sheets per thickness.

On one square lightly spread vegemite then sprinkle with the grated cheese.

On another square sprinkle the meat then cheese

On another spread the pesto and sprinkle with cheese

this will give you 3 different flavours however you can be as creative as you like.

I generally stick to these as they are simple, we usually have all ingredients in the pantry or fridge and both hubby and toddler enjoy them.

Once you have your large square laid out with filling on top, cut them into 2.

They can be cut diagonally to give triangular shapes or you can cut top to bottom to give you long rectangular shapes – whatever you prefer.

Starting with the triangle pastry’s, take a corner from the longest side and slowly and gently roll the pastry until it resembles a rod like shape.

Once you have the rod like shape you can either leave like this and simply place on a greased baking tray or you can then roll the pastry into a snail like shape.

With the rectangular length, again roll either length ways to give you a longer rod or across ways for a shorter thicker rod like shape.

You could always cut the rectangular into squares and keep them small – more toddler like.

Once you have all your desired shapes – again you can be as creative as you like, place them onto your baking tray making sure that they are not touching each other to stop them sticking then using a fork lightly beat the eggs to create a wash.

Once you have lightly painted on the egg wash you can either sprinkle more grated cheese or leave as is and put in your preheated oven for approx 15-20minutes.

Once they are cooked, let them cool and enjoy!

This is a quick and yummy snack for everyone.

You could always use jam and make pin wheels or experiment and be creative.

Another favourite in my home is using diced olives, tomato paste and grated cheese! Delicious.