Mexican chicken bowl.

Mexican chicken bowl.

I love easy recipes that the whole family will eat. It’s even better when it’s a 1 pot or 1 pan kinda meal. Less cleaning and less mess!

Here is one that a good friend of mine makes and I’ve changed a few ingredients to suit my taste buds.

Another good swap is by using browned mince instead of chicken and you can also add green capsicum and half salsa half BBQ sauce.

Be creative, think about the flavours that you like and adapt this recipe to suit your taste buds.

Ingredients

6 tortilla wraps – I use wholemeal the medium sized ones from the supermarket bread aisle.
3 cups cooked chopped chicken – I used a BBQ chicken and simply pull it apart.
1 x tablespoon olive oil
1 x cup red capsicum, chopped
1 x can red kidney beans, black beans or chilli beans
1 x can corn kernels
1 x teaspoon chilli powder – I use fresh chilli approx 1 small red chilli
3 x cups salsa – I use medium heat – store bought jars – approx 2 jars
1 1/2 x cups sour cream
1 1/2 x cups grated cheddar cheese
1 1/2 x cups grated mozzarella cheese
Method

Preheat oven to 200 degrees.

Spray a casserole dish large enough to fit tortillas.

Heat olive oil in pan and cook capsicum for 5 minutes, or until softened.

Mix in chilli and remove from heat, stir in beans and corn.

In a medium bowl, mix salsa and sour cream.

Layer tortilla, salsa mixture, chicken, tortilla, vegetables, cheeses.

Repeat 4 times, or until you reach the top of the casserole dish. Top with cheese.

Cover and bake for 25 minutes. Uncover and bake for another 10-15 minutes or until the cheese is bubbling and browning.

Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.

2nd wife?

The second wife.

So as with most mums whilst my little one is playing and running around at the park I generally chat to other mummies whilst watching him.

I had this very interesting conversation with the other day with another mummy who like mine, her husband was married before her. She called herself the 2nd wife, which I found an interesting label.

So after swapping stories that my hubby was previously married and that we have 1 child together with another on the way, she also had 1 child with her hubby and they were trying for another we got talking about the strangest label of being ‘the 2nd wife’.

When I asked her why she called herself the 2nd wife her answer was simple and true, because she is the second wife.

Her hubby was married previously. She continued to tell me that it’s not a bad thing and that in fact she see’s it as a positive. She said that lots of men have baggage these days and instead of seeing all the negatives, she focuses on the positives.

So after sharing a few laughs and chatting for about an hour I asked ‘so tell me some of these positives, of being the second wife?’.

Her list began –

He made his mistake with the first one and now knows not to do it again.

He now appreciates it takes 2 to make a marriage work and effort on both sides is required.

He now knows what he wants from a marriage and is willing to work for it.

He know’s what he will and won’t put up with from his wife, yet also understand what is acceptable. No frequent big boozy nights and she isn’t the live in help.

So I thought I’d do some further research.

Now this is no disrespect to those on their first marriage, it may be the only marriage that you have. I myself am in my first marriage. However with divorce rates so high, almost 50% of all marriages end in divorce if both parties are on their first marriage. If one or both are on a second marriage, it drops by almost half. Hmmm interesting statistics, so I needed to look into this further for myself. This is what I found in an article written in the UK Daily Mail.

Couples in second marriages are ‘less likely to get divorced’ because they benefit from the experience of the first.

This study found those on their second union benefit from age and experience, and are more ready to commit. Rather than sliding into a marriage without much thought they will have carefully weighed the pros and cons.

Couples on their second marriage are more likely to stay together as they benefit from the experiences and lessons of the past.

‘One possibility is that higher age is a proxy for higher income. Higher income acts as a buffer against some of the everyday difficulties faced by most couples.

‘Another possibility is that higher age means there are fewer young children from prior relationships. ‘And fewer second marriages for men are subject to the social and family pressures that lead into some first marriages. Hence men tend to do better second time round.’

Relationship expert Dr Pam Spurr said that while previous statistics have shown that second marriages break down more quickly, maturity may well aid to save a second marriage.

She added the second marriages can be particularly problematic when there are children from both previous marriages.

And Relate counsellor Paula Hall pointed out that money can be tighter in a second marriage due to divorce settlements and child support payments etc so their is more strain on finances within the second marriage however knowing the respect for each other and working together maturely, issues like these can be resolved. It’s been days that second marriages are less expectant on materialistic things and focus more on inner love and happiness.

But she added: ‘People in second marriages seem to have more insight and self-awareness. Having gone through divorce and separation, there can be more motivation to work through problems and save the marriage.’

Are you on your second marriage?

Do you have any insight on marriage?

I’d love to hear your stories.

Noordinarymummy@gmail.com

Pregnancy snacks – healthy options.

Healthy pregnancy snacks!

Firstly let me start by saying, these are not just snacks for pregnant women. However when your pregnant there are many restrictions that you perhaps should and shouldn’t have within your diet, so finding healthy options to curb your craving and stop the nausea can sometimes be difficult.

Below are my trusty snacks that are a healthy option – so that I’m not packing on too many extra kilo’s but also eating the right foods for both bub and me.

I understand cravings can override health and you just want to reach for a burger and fry’s, well I’m not saying don’t, what I’m saying is choose better choices. I sometimes find that if I’m craving hot chips / fry’s and I make my own oven baked rather than deep fried, they succumb the craving and I don’t generally eat the serving that I made for myself anyway.

Green apples – I love crunchy food during pregnancy, not sure why but I do.

Vita wheats – just plain, nothing on them, again crunchy but filled with many vitamins, seeds, whole grains and good stuff.

Cheddar / tasty cheese – yes unfort they say to stay away from soft or light coloured cheeses due to homogenised mill etc but a sharp tasty is just as delicious either alone or on crackers.

Yogurt – extra dairy which is great calcium, just watch the sugar content. Sometimes it best to have natural Greek yogurt and add your own fresh fruit for the sweetness.

Toss Salad – easy and healthy and crunchy packed with vitamins and minerals. A simple tomato, half an avocado and some chopped cucumber, cold, fresh, crunchy and delicious. I sometimes squeeze fresh lemon juice in for extra kick. This will satisfy both sweet or sour cravings.you could also add cheese.

Carrots – Yep trusty old crunchy carrot sticks! Cold and full of fibre and good vitamins.

Potato chips / wedges – Yep you can indulge – make your own. Cut your potatoes in either wedges or strips/chips and put on a non stick oven tray and bake for approx 25 minutes or until golden. You can use white or sweet potato. Add some salt and munch away!

Cold sausages – yes I said it. I know some women can’t stand the smell of cooked meat so have someone else BBQ these for you and store them cold. It’s important to keep up unite proteins and iron levels during pregnancy so try not to cut out red meats. Eating them cold generally helps subside the aromas.

Orange – I like mine cold, I also find it hard to keep my fluids up as I suffer terrible morning sickness. By eating an orange I’m getting lots of vitamins especially vitamin c and it’s also helping with my hydration.

Boiled Eggs – Packed full of lots of good things, boiled eggs are great to have in the fridge. I do a batch and just leave them. Again once cold the aroma isn’t too bad and these little babies are full of goodness. One large egg contains (1):
Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin): 9% of the RDA.
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): 15% of the RDA.
Vitamin A: 6% of the RDA.
Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid): 7% of the RDA.
Selenium: 22% of the RDA.
Eggs also contain small amounts of almost every vitamin and mineral required by the human body… including calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, manganese, Vitamin E, Folate and many more.
A large egg contains 77 calories, with 6 grams of quality protein, 5 grams of fat and trace amounts of carbohydrates.

Sunflower or pumpkin seeds – full of magnesium these are a good nibble.

Pork – an excellent source of thiamine. Have the occasional good-quality grilled sausage or slice of lean ham. Even on toast this is also helping with protein.

Beans (baked beans) – high in fibre these will help stop the dreaded constipation that most women experience during pregnancy.

Pikelets – I personally love the golden ones from the super market and I eat them dry. I find that they are light, fluffy, not dense and with minimal flavour eaten dry they seem to calm my nausea.

Chemicals in Toothpaste.

I found this article very interesting.

Im not ‘herbal’ or only into natural things however I am concience of what I do put into my body and into my family.

This has been an interesting read and I will be sure to check the toothpaste bottom colour prior to my next purchase.

http://www.yourfoodcorner.com/2014/10/hidden-secret-behind-toothpaste-bottom-color/

Occupying your toddler – for at least 10 minutes!

So today is a bit of a weird weather say, poured rain this morning, then the sun was shining beautifully now it’s turned windy and overcast. I was googling things to do with my toddler. Hubby is studying for exams so we are pretty much solo, what to do?

I found this pretty cool link that is using things that most of us would have around our homes.

Its a little crafty and defiantly will have your toddler concentrating and using their motor skills.

Pretty inventive and low cost with minimal mess! Fun!

Click this link for ideas on how to occupy your toddler – for at least 10 minutes anyway.

http://lemonlimeadventures.com/simple-2-minute-toddler-activities/#_a5y_p=2590730

Sweet and sticky rissoles.

Sweet n sticky lamb rissoles.

So this is a recipe that I surprised myself with during the week.

I bought lamb mince and wasn’t sure what I was going to use it for so decided I’d try out some trusty old rissoles / meatballs.

To my surprise they were sooooo good!

So here is what I did.

Ingredients
500gm lean lamb mince
1 x egg
1 x teaspoon minced garlic or 1 clove crushed garlic
1/4 x cup BBQ sauce – you could use rob sauce also
1 x tablespoon worstershire sauce
1/2 x cup wholemeal breadcrumbs

Method
Put the mince and sauces into a bowl preferable glass or tin as will help infuse the flavours. Knead well then co dr with cling wrap and refrigerate for at minimal 1hour.

Once the mince and sauces have sat add the egg combining well but not too much as you dont want to break down the protein of either the egg or mince.

Slowly add the breadcrumbs combining well ensuring and even texture.

Divide mixture into balls about the size of your palm.

Roll into balls then slightly flatten so that they are approx 2cm thick and 8-10cm in diameter – these are how I cooked them but choose your own size. This size made 8 rissoles.

Cook in a medium heated non stick fry pan until browned each side, remembering the sauce will ooze out and caramelise causing a slight burnt look. This is really yummy and doesn’t taste burnt.

Allow to stand as will be super hot straight from the pan.

I had mine with a side of mash potato, these were so good you could make them into hamburgers, have with salad or even veg. Whatever you choose!

I had a few left over and my hubby ate them cold and said how good they were also cold.

Should keep in the fridge in an air tight container for approx 4 days, providing the hate not demolished! Yumo!

Morning sickness!

Morning sickness!

For anyone that has suffered, I feel for you. With my first pregnancy I thought I had it bad. Vomiting, headaches, constantly tired, achy limbs, swollen ankles and that’s just what I remember.

This time around it’s worse! How could it possibly be worse you ask? Well it is. I’m vomiting all day, mostly bile and being graphic it also helps itself out my nose! Still all the body aches and headaches and super tired but hey, I’m growing a baby inside!

So yes, there is my announcement, we are pregnant and although I’m feeling absolutely rotten, I’m blessed and exited and extremely happy that I am having another child. Extending my family and giving my little guy a sibling.

So throughout all my morning sickness I’ve tried multiple remedies and let me say, not much has worked for me.

I’ve tried the dry crackers beside the bed first thing of a morning.

I’ve tried sipping sparkling water.

I’ve tried ginger tablets.

I’ve tried sea sick and travel sick tablets.

I’ve tried sucking ginger.

I’ve tried taking the morning sickness tables.

I’ve even tried maxalon!

Over tried dry toast.

I’ve tried black tea.

Nothing as worked for me.

So what causes morning sickness?

Below is an article by Victorian health that explains why we experience morning sickness and how we can try combat it!

I found it an interesting read, as most of you already know and understand, Morning sickness is caused by the hormones in your body adjusting and growing another little person inside you and with all the change it causes havoc in some women.

I’d love to hear your remedies or morning sickness stories.

Email me – noordinarymummy@gmail.com
Search:
For most women, morning sickness begins around the fourth week of pregnancy and generally goes away around the 12th to 14th week. However, bear in mind one in five pregnant women will suffer morning sickness into their second trimester, and an unfortunate few will also experience nausea and vomiting for the entire duration of their 9 month pregnancy.

In most cases, morning sickness doesn’t harm the woman or the unborn child. However, severe morning sickness that includes weight loss and dehydration needs prompt medical attention. This may also require a drip or even hospitalisation.
Some Symptoms of morning sickness can include:
Nausea
Loss of appetite
Vomiting
Psychological effects, such as depression and anxiety.

The myth of hysteria and morning sickness

Unrelenting morning sickness can have a profound effect on your quality of life, preventing you from working, socialising and looking after your other children.

Pregnant women enduring morning sickness report higher levels of psychological stress, including anxiety and depression. This prompted the false belief that morning sickness is purely psychosomatic, which means that the woman’s fears and anxieties trigger her physical discomfort. However, there is no research to support these claims.

Possible causes of morning sickness

The cause of morning sickness remains a mystery, but it is thought a combination of physical and metabolic factors play a significant role, including:
High levels of hormones, including oestrogen
Fluctuations in blood pressure, particularly lowered blood pressure
Altered metabolism of carbohydrates
The enormous physical and chemical changes that pregnancy triggers.

Morning sickness and your baby

Some women are concerned that the action of vomiting may threaten their unborn baby. Vomiting and retching may strain the abdominal muscles and cause localised aching and soreness, but the physical mechanics of vomiting won’t harm the baby. The fetus is perfectly cushioned inside its sac of amniotic fluid.

Numerous studies have discovered that moderate morning sickness is associated with a reduced risk of miscarriage. However, prolonged vomiting (that leads to dehydration and weight loss) can deprive your child of proper nutrition and increase the risk of your baby being underweight at birth.

If you have nausea and vomiting that will not stop, contact your doctor or midwife.

Severe morning sickness (hyperemesis gravidarum)

Severe morning sickness is known as hyperemesis gravidarum (HG), and can affect around one in 1,000 pregnant women. The symptoms of HG include repeated vomiting, weight loss and dehydration. Treatment usually involves hospitalisation, and the administering of intravenous liquids and nutrition.

The possible complications of untreated hyperemesis gravidarum include:
Electrolyte imbalances
Extreme depression and anxiety
Malnourishment of the fetus
Excessive strain on vital organs, including the liver, heart, kidneys and brain.

Managing morning sickness

Suggestions for coping with morning sickness include:
Don’t take drugs of any kind, unless your doctor knows you are pregnant and has prescribed specific medications.
Eat a few dry crackers or plain sweet biscuits before getting out of bed in the morning.
Don’t eat anything that you suspect will make you nauseous. In general high-carbohydrate meals are well tolerated.
Eat small meals regularly, as an empty stomach tends to trigger nausea.
It may help to avoid cooking or preparing foods.
Drink as much as you can manage. Sometimes sips of flat lemonade, diluted fruit juice, cordial, weak tea, ginger tea, clear soup or beef extract drinks are helpful. If none of these are bearable, try sucking on ice cubes.
Vitamin B6 supplements can be useful, but doses above 200 mg per day can actually be harmful. Follow your doctor’s advice.
Consider acupressure or acupuncture on the wrist.
Wear loose clothes that don’t constrict your abdomen.
Moving around may aggravate morning sickness. Rest whenever possible.

Seeing your doctor about morning sickness

Always seek medical advice if your morning sickness is severe, if you have lost a lot of weight quickly, or if you feel depressed or anxious. Treatment options can include drugs that won’t harm your developing baby.

Where to get help
Your doctor
Maternal and child health nurse

Things to remember
Around half to two-thirds of all pregnant women will experience morning sickness.
Possible causes include high levels of hormones, blood pressure fluctuations and changes in carbohydrate metabolism.
Severe morning sickness, called hyperemesis gravidarum, may require hospitalisation.
Symptoms of morning sickness may be relieved by eating a few dry crackers before you get up in the morning, avoiding foods and smells that make you nauseous, drinking plenty of fluids and choosing high-carbohydrate and high-protein foods.
Better Health Channel

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