Debate or Discussion?

Debate, discussion, communication and opinions.

I’m all for a robust discussion. A disagreement. A difference if opinion. Bring it on.

But so often what I’m seeing from my inside my computer, as a busy mum and blogger is that the average person is hitting the keyboard and secretly saying things online they would never dream of saying in real life.

Words, that they are humiliated and ashamed to say or even own when they are either confronted or are outed.

It’s enough. People are very much I feel happy to write the abusive email, quick text of anger and or a message of nastiness not even thinking of the implications. By hitting send in any communication form or hanging up the phone after that mean message, there will always be implications.

We all have opinion’s and we are all very much entitled to this, please remember though, your message, text, call, email may just be the final tip that really hurts someone, hurts their feelings, emotions and is unrepairable. If you send this to someone who is possible suffering depression or who may be suicidal or in a terrible frame of mind it could be the worst decision ever.

Think before your send. I’ve said this before but every action has a reaction.

You don’t necessarily know how the receiver is feeling of what they are going through. Be kind.

We’re better than this. All of us.

Burpee’s – The exercise.

Burpee’s….? (The exercise)

I’ve been doing some research on different exercises and how they can benefit and it hinder our bodies. Let’s face it, some exercises can be quite ‘jolting’ or ‘harsh’ or ‘demanding’ on our different body parts which can cause injury. Now before you stop reading or decide – ‘yep, exercise causes injury, there’s no reason for me to hurt myself’ each exercise when preformed correctly can actually benefit and do your body justice.

I’ve just read an article on Burpee’s. Yep the age old Burpee!

Now knowing my background as a personal trainer, I don’t remember having my client do many if these. I think although they have been used and performed for centuries, I personally believe that the new ‘Cross Fit’ training has inspired trainer all over the world, to bring back the Burpee!

It makes sense to me and whilst I’m sitting in the couch waiting for my toddler to wake from his midday sleep writing this blog, my hubby asked ‘why are you writing about something you don’t actually do?’ Hmmmm well hubby just because I don’t do them right now, doesn’t mean others don’t.  In fact now I’m feeling a little inspired to do some, perhaps tomorrow 🙂
Burpees 101: What They Are & Benefits!

This six-count bodyweight movement is used across the country in workouts by coaches, fitness fans, and trainers alike as an all-around conditioning exercise that gets the heart rate up. A burpee is a squat that moves into a quickly into a plank position, then back up to standing in one quick movement.

“A burpee is somewhat equal to a push up, good morning, air squat, and a vertical jump all in one”.

If done correctly, the exercise will train the pushing muscles of the upper body, all the muscles of the lower body, and the core muscles. Giving you – a complete all over body workout.

Breaking It Down

1. Start by standing up straight. Bend over at the hips, pushing the hips slightly back and reaching down to touch the floor with your hands while keeping both your feet on the floor (your can bend your knees slightly, but you want to make sure you’re using your hamstrings for the strength).

2. From there, quickly jump back with your feet into a push-up / plank position.

3. Your chest should only then slightly touch the floor. You don’t necessarily need to do a true push-up but don’t slump onto the floor, using your core and stomach muscles to stabilise your body weight.

4. Return into the plank position by pushing up with your hands (again keeping your core tight).

5. Push back up by using the power from your hips and bottom to bring your feet in toward your hands. Try to land on the whole foot as to stop any rolling of the ankle.

6. Explosively again jump upward, most people add a clap or throw their hands up into the air for the extra ‘oomph’.

To practice getting the hips fired up for a Burpee, it’s best to practice the burpee with your feet together and then play around with your foot position. Just keep in mind that if your feet go further out than your shoulders, it will be harder to use your hips and bottom muscles when jumping back up.

Burpee Benefits

There are a lot of benefits that come from doing burpees, the most obvious of which is being able to get up quickly after a fall.

A Burpee is a movement that develops strength, endurance, explosiveness, and coordination because there’s so much going on.

Most fitness professionals or athlete’s say that you can reap many benefits from doing burpees no matter your form, it’s also reiterated that there are no specific rules on how to get from standing to the floor and back up again, however there are ways to make the whole process a whole lot more efficient.

By doing your burpees properly you will not fatigue as fast and will be able to keep going performing these exercises longer.

In a high rep burpee workout—think more about good form. When you’re working for speed, think less is more, move faster. A Burpee is great for cardiovascular workout also!

Try doing 3 sets of 10 Burpee’s 3 times a week and build from there!

Love them? Or hate them? Tell me what you think of burpees or have you got a favourite exercise?

Easy, healthy meatloaf muffins!

Toddler meatloaf!

My toddler has all of a sudden became very fussy with food. Unless it’s cheese sticks, ham or chicken in a biscuit.

I’m finding it tough to feed him nutritious food that will fill him up.

I stumbled across this old recipe in one of my books but altered it to fit muffin trays, perfect singular serves for toddlers.

My little guy doesn’t love them but he also doesn’t refuse them! Good sign 🙂

This recipe is super quick, very easy and has nutrients from the vegetables and meat where you can either add extra vege if you like.

Ingredients
750g beef mince
1/2 onion, finely chopped (optional)
1 x 170gm no added salt tomato paste
3 x carrots grated
1 small zucchini grated
1/4 cup breadcrumbs
2 x egg, lightly beaten
6 cherry tomatoes, halved

Method
Preheat oven to 180°C.
Spray six 3/4-cup capacity muffin tin with cooking oil spray and set aside.

Place the mince in a large bowl along with the tomato paste, carrot, zucchini, breadcrumbs and egg. Mix until fully combined.

Press mince mixture into prepared muffin holes and press in half a cherry tomato into the top of each.

Transfer to oven and cook for 25 minutes, or until cooked through.

Allow to stand for a couple of minutes, drain excess liquid before serving delicious with steamed vegetables or salad.

Endometriosis

Endometriosis.

This is a female disorder that is believed can affect fertility.

Don’t get me wrong, this is a serious medical condition, Severe endometriosis with extensive scarring and organ damage may affect fertility. It is considered one of the three major causes of female infertility; about 30 percent to 40 percent of women with endometriosis are infertile. However it is also very treatable.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endometriosis

http://www.idph.state.il.us/about/womenshealth/factsheets/endo.htm

I had a girlfriend telling me about this woman she knows who claimed to have this terrible medical condition in order to convince her then partner that she needed to have a baby sooner rather than later. She was also getting older so possibly had the ‘time is a ticking’ mentality also.

She led her then partner to believe that by having a baby it can ‘cure’ her endometriosis. Medical studies have actually proven this is incorrect.

This had many effects on the relationship because at that stage of their relationship they were not ‘solid’ or in a good place. My friend believes she trapped him into staying with her by feeling sorry for her. She also believes that she ‘used’ the baby as a bargaining tool.

I personally don’t think that having a baby when your relationship isn’t strong is a wise idea as children need a family structure around them and love and support. They don’t ask to be bought into the world so why should they be used as a ‘band aid’ so to speak to try and ‘keep’ the partner or ‘fix’ the relationship?

This is not fair to the partner but most of all the innocent child.

This is sad in so many ways.

They have since broke up and did so when the child was only a baby. 🙁 she is still struggling to move on with her life and find a new partner, perhaps they sense her deceptiveness? And the worst part is, according to my friend she does not make her child a priority?

Why do women do this?

I don’t understand.

Children are not ‘bargaining tools’ they are not something you have to try and fix a relationship. If you think that a child will ‘fix’ your relationship your wrong!

Having children is the most wonderful and rewarding thing I have ever done and yes it can be stressful when they don’t sleep, or are sick and will defiantly strain your patience and possibly put strain and pressure on your relationship but I think they are absolutely worth it and if your relationship isn’t strong enough to get you through these sleepless nights and learning phases of being a new parent, it will break you. Hence why I believe you need to be in a solid relationship prior to having a baby.

Unless you are wanting to be a single parent and know you have the strength and ability to raise your precious innocent child alone. If this is your choice I applaud your strength.

All I ask is that you think before you have a child. Many people struggle to fall and others use medical conditions as excuses to fall pregnant.

In my point of view, this woman is clearly deceitful and vicious. She lied to get what she wanted and doesn’t deserve to have the child that she has never made her priority.

Children should be put first. Loved and adored. Not used to ‘fix’ your relationship so please don’t lie about serious conditions to try and fix your relationship.

Baking soda beauty fix’s!

Baking soda beauty products?

Baking soda has been a kitchen staple for generations, but now more than ever it’s also a major player in the beauty world. Secrets of hairdressers, beauticians and make up artists alike, this very inexpensive every day product that most of us already have in our pantry works great for many DIY hair and beauty needs.

Deodorant
Mix baking soda with a little bit of water, so it turns into a moist paste, then apply under the arms as a deodorant. It’s great for preventing sweat stains and body odor.

Shampoo
Every now and then, our hair gains product buildup. Add a small amount of kitchen wonder baking soda into your shampoo and use as normal. It will clean all that buildup from your hair and give you great shine!

Teeth whitening
This is an old faithful – many people already do this trusty tip.
“Mix 1 tablespoon baking soda, 5 drops hydrogen peroxide, and a few drops of water. To make a teeth whitening solution, mix the baking soda and hydrogen peroxide in a small container until a consistent paste. Only add water if necessary,” Apply the solution to your teeth evenly with a toothbrush, and allow it to stay on the teeth for approx five minutes. Brush off with normal toothpaste and rinse thoroughly with water. For consistent results, repeat this process once a week. “If you’re not satisfied with the results, leave the mixture on for approx 10 minutes, no longer though, as you may get an uneven application and your teeth can become sensitive,”

Cuticles
Again create a paste from baking soda and warm water then rub gently on your cuticles. If you like, make a little extra and treat your hands with the same mixture.

Body Exfoliant
Baking soda makes a fabulous, all-natural exfoliant. Just mix a little with some water in your palm and scrub it all over your face. Instant dead skin cell remover.

Blackheads
A teaspoon of baking soda mixed with a cup of distilled water makes an excellent solution for blackheads. “This is what many professional estheticians use (or they buy a pre-made solution which is basically the same) either with steam or with galvanic current prior to extractions. It helps draw out the blackheads and imperfections and also makes extractions come out more easily.

Stress Relief Bath
Baking soda also makes a great bath. Mix it with equal parts sea salt and add your favorite essential oil if you would like a scent (lavender or jasmine are proven for calming.)

Dry Shampoo
If you are out of dry shampoo or are on the run, baking soda can be a great substitute. Simply sprinkle approx half a teaspoon (or less, depending on how oily your hair is) onto your hair. You can always add more, but you don’t want to use too much. Then, just comb, fluff, and enjoy.

Being a mummy.

I love being a mum!

I read many blogs and quite often find myself drawn to 2 in particular, yes MamaMia by Mia Freedman and Mouths of Mums.

As you know I recently gave up my career, actually let’s rephrase it ‘I’ve put my career on hold to have a family’. I’m sure I will go back to work at some stage but for now I’m a mummy.

I am also the first to admit that I struggled with this. Along with the complete financial reliance on my hubby I felt I was also giving up some of my independence. I’m not sure if other parents have felt the same when they made this decision however I certainly did.

It’s now been approx 4 months since I gave up my employment and I must say I love being a mummy. I have many friends and acquaintances who may not agree with me, they may feel like they struggle. I however am relishing in it and absolutely adore being a mummy. I absolutely adore my son too! 🙂

I have no deadlines, I have no immediate commitments, work to my own schedule and can sit around in my pyjamas all day if I feel like it. Not that this actually happens as our days are filled with reading group, gymbaroo, swimming lessons, play dates and general house hold chores including grocery shopping, washing, dishes, preparing meals and much more! But I still love it and feel grateful that my husband and I are in a position where I can be a stay at home mummy. I know some family’s simply can not afford to have one parent stay at home, I feel very fortunate and lucky.

I truly believe that being a stay at home parent is not for everyone and some people need a career or something more. I did love my job but after long consideration do not regret giving it up for my little man. Each day he inspires me and makes me laugh. I often find myself just looking at him and wondering what I did prior to having him? Each day he teaches me something new both about life and about myself. The love I have for him is indescribable and grows more and more with every passing day.

Again not everyone wants to be a stay at home parent, not everyone can be a stay at home parent for what ever their reasoning. It may be financial, it may be that they are more career focussed, perhaps they are a better parent when they are also working. Whatever their reasons, it’s an individual choice and no one should judge another for their choices.

So this now brings me to another article I read on my favourite MamaMia blog. It has made me feel even better about my decision to be a stay at home mummy. I enjoy being a mummy and cherish the fact that I can actually have all this time with my little man, seeing him grow and explore and make his own adventures.

I’ve pasted the article below to share with others who may be feeling in a conundrum about their choices.

By ALISSA WARREN

I like being a mum.

There, I said it.

In fact, I’ll go one step further. I love being a mum.
For years, I’ve been a bit sheepish about admitting it. I’d go as far as to say I felt a bit embarrassed.

Admitting you enjoy motherhood is met with the same looks you might get if you mentioned that you wear a Batman mask for fun. Or you wash your bed linen twice a day.

Like, what?

Somehow, this innocent, OBVIOUS statement has become almost socially unacceptable to say out loud.

Those five little words.

I love being a mum.

I’ve thought about this a lot lately. About why there is a stigma to saying you love motherhood. And I think there are three reasons we’re reluctant to say it.

The first is that up until relatively recently, saying “I love it!” was the only possible answer to the question “Are you enjoying motherhood?” There were no other acceptable options. As soon as they had children, women had to hide their unhappiness, their frustration, their guilt, their anxiety and their boredom for fear of being labelled a bad mother or an ungrateful one. Being negative or honest was frowned upon so women self-censored. Post natal depression didn’t even have a name let alone any community or medical understanding.

Being able to speak openly about the hard parts of motherhood has been undoubtedly a positive thing. It’s a less isolating experience now. There’s a better, wider understanding of the challenges involved in parenthood. There’s no longer pressure to be a Carol Brady Stepford Wife who’s hap-hap-happy all the time!

The result of this though, is that the pendulum has swung too far. There’s a sense among some women that by being positive about motherhood, you’re somehow letting the side down. Which confused me for a long time. Because when I say I love motherhood, I’m not suggesting everyone should. Not all the time, anyway. I’m not undermining anything any other woman wants to say about the experience. I’m not implicitly criticising any other mother for being less positive than me.

But surely my voice and my experience counts too? Surely there’s room for a range of different expressions about the experience of motherhood? Why does one sentiment have to cancel out another? It doesn’t.

The conversations about motherhood are so often about the struggles, the tantrums, the balance, the homework and the no-sleep. Sure, there’s that.

But recently, it’s become ONLY that. Because sometimes it feels like mothers aren’t really allowed to say we love motherhood. With good intentions, the good stuff has taken a backseat for fear of offending people who didn’t/couldn’t have children and for fear of upsetting the mothers who were struggling.

Peversely, singing the praises of motherhood has pretty much become taboo.

Have we been shit-canning motherhood for so long and in such depth, that we can’t even remember – and savour – the main game?

I’m reclaiming the land. That doesn’t mean I don’t feel for women who can’t have children or that I think childless women are living incomplete lives. Nor do I want to be insensitive to mothers who can’t be parents, who want to be – a sadness I can’t begin to imagine.

But I’d like to put an end to the collective shaming of ‘enjoying life with children’.

Because I love it. And I’m not ashamed to say, these are the bits I love the most.

1. It’s full.
My life is packed. Full of cuddles, arguments, questions like, ‘does God have eyes?’ and squeaky little voices. Their words fill the air. Always. Their little lives fill my heart. And literally, too. I have so many Nurofen syringes that I don’t have anywhere to put my kitchen scissors. I have so many colourful drink bottles busting from our Tupperware drawer that I had to throw out my extra tea towels. My days are long, my weeks are fast. They’re full. And fulfilling.

2. My kids have given me the greatest gift: patience.
Children don’t rush to put their shoes on, do a wee, get into the car, sit in their carseat or put their seatbelt on. This process once took me about 7.5 seconds. It takes my children a minimum of 17 minutes. This busy life has the slowest of moments and while it’s taken me a long time to stop nagging and embrace it. (However, I believe others may not be so keen to embrace how LATE we are).

3. It’s fun.
Oh, the horror. I just said motherhood was F-U-N! I can hear the sharpening of pitchforks. But it’s true. It’s funny and it’s fun. My kids’ little faces when I tell them they can have Weet Bix for dinner. Or the way they stare at themselves in the reflection of the mirror to see their little teeth. Or when they blame a fart on someone else. Or when they talk to birds. It’s humour at it’s purest and most original.

4. There’s no bullshit.
There’s no room for sensitive souls on the home front. Everyone gets a dressing down. There’s little space for a mum to have a ‘bad day’ and wallow around feeling sorry for herself. There’s no better pick-me-up than a forced one.

5. It’s the best thing I’ve ever done.
Enough said.

But that’s the thing, there’s not enough being said.

The ingredients that make up motherhood should be celebrated for their simplicity and loveliness. Let’s reignite the love.

 

Parenting whilst distracted.

Parenting whilst distracted.

I’ve previously written an article on a similar subject but I feel very strongly about it and recently read a very informative article by an extremely reputable paediatric specialist. This was also on SBS recently so I felt I needed to share this information from someone who does know what they are talking about.

Their words are easy to understand and this makes absolute sense to me.

I’m not saying there is no place for technology, we live in a very technologically advanced world, however what I am saying, is that there is a time and place for it.

Our children are only young once. Enjoy the time.

Have a read and let me know your thoughts.

Parenting while distracted.
I’ve been a pediatrician for 20 years, and I thought I’d seen it all. But not long ago, when a father brought his 2-year-old into my clinic, something happened that has me deeply concerned.
Written By Jane Scott
Source The Washington Post
11 AUG 2014 –

I’ve been a pediatrician for 20 years, and I thought I’d seen it all. But not long ago, when a father brought his 2-year-old into my clinic, something happened that has me deeply concerned.

Upon entering my examining room, I found father and son sitting together, eyes downcast, each silently scrolling and tapping on smartphones. During my initial exam, the father directed most of my questions to his frowning toddler, who indicated that his ears hurt, and I quickly discovered that both eardrums were red and inflamed.

“Guess what?” I said to my small patient. “Your ears hurt because you have an ear infection. But we can give you medicine and make you better.” I smiled at the little boy and his father. Immediately, the child picked up his phone and pushed a button. “Siri,” he asked carefully. “What ear ‘fection?”

At age 2, a few minutes on a smartphone isn’t a big deal; screen time is a part of growing up today, and most parents try to set appropriate limits. But when a child so young turned to a machine for information instead of to his father, it made me wonder: Just how limited was his parents’ screen time? What I saw was modeled behavior — a child who has learned that when he has a question, Siri, and not Dad, is most readily available with an answer.

It’s hard to say for sure based on this one moment, but there can be no doubt about the larger trend: Parents today are probably the most informed and involved generation in history. And, yet, in the company of their children, they often act as though they’d rather be someplace else. That’s what they’re saying when they break eye contact to glance at their push notifications or check Facebook when they think their child’s distracted. The parents are present, their attention is not.

In my practice, I see evidence every day of how such inattention affects kids. It’s expressed in temper tantrums and separation anxiety, and older children who resist discipline. Most parents are taught that this is all normal, that children are biologically wired this way. Not exactly. Yes, all of this is normal attention-getting behavior, but it often is preventable.

Consider the results of a March study by researchers from Boston Medical Center who carefully observed caregivers and children at fast-food restaurants. Out of 55 caregivers, 40 used their mobile devices, and their absorption was such that their “primary engagement was with the device, rather than the child.” In many cases, the caregivers expressed irritation when the children tried to get their attention. One observer watched a woman push a small boy away as he took her face in his hands in an attempt to get her to look up from her tablet.

It’s possible all those adults were following an urgent work email thread. More likely, they were on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest. A 2011 Nielsen poll found that people with children use social media more than those without. Maybe these adults were reading an article shared by another parent. Maybe they were making plans with friends and family. But they were definitely communicating to their children that they were less important than whatever was on those devices.

This might seem absurd to today’s parents, who feel like they give themselves to their children in ways previous generations never imagined. But the undivided attention that children need from us is in jeopardy. Most people just don’t realize how much time they’re spending online; what feels like a few minutes is often a half hour or more. When we are with our children, we need to be with our children — not with them except for the part of us that’s reading emails, tweeting and checking Facebook.

Another reason for parents to put down their phones: Though Facebook may provide community, it can also promote competition and unreachable standards of perfection. Through Facebook, we read an endless litany of our friends’ boasts about their children. It’s enough to make a person wonder what she’s doing wrong because her child prefers plain pasta over the curry special or “Old MacDonald” to Chopin. Though most parents would say they’re not competitive in this way, many worry privately that they might be short-changing their kids.

Social media has a place and a purpose, but too many parents are creating unnecessary stress by trying to be in two places at once, while modeling to their children that online relationships take precedence over real ones. In an era of constant distraction, we must decide what’s more important: heeding the constant ping of our devices or telling our children, in word and deed, “I am listening. I am here. And there’s nowhere else I’d rather be.”